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azadi

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Reply with quote  #16 
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Originally Posted by Ethiomonarchist


The Constitution of the Kingdom of Cambodia makes the lack of children by the reigning monarch a non-issue.  The succession is determined by the Crown Council which, upon the death of the King, meets and selects a member of either the Norodom or Sisowath royal families to sit on the throne.  There is no shortage of Princes of either family.  Oman is a bit of a problem yes...




Very good point.  Requiring the reigning monarch be a member of every ethnic group or every religion in a country is ethnicism and not really compatible with the concept of monarchy.  That would rule out many existing monarchies.  Just a bad idea all around.  Importing a completely foreign royal makes even less sense and the instances where it has happened have not generally been very successful at all.

As a Kurd, the well-being of the Kurdish people is far more important to me than monarchism. The Hashemite kings of Iraq oppressed the Kurds. I want Jordan to remain a Hashemite kingdom, because the Hashemites have been decent kings of Jordan. But the Hashemites must never be allowed to rule Kurdistan and East Jerusalem again. The Hashemite kings of Iraq oppressed the Kurds, and the Hashemite kings of Jordan expelled the ancient Jewish community of Jerusalem from the Old City of Jerusalem. In addition, the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan is sheltering the family of Saddam. Saddam committed genocide against the Kurdish people.
I support Kurdish independence from Iraq, but I want the President of Iraq to remain a Kurd, as long as Kurdistan remains part of Iraq. The President of Iraq being a Kurd symbolizes the Kurdish people no longer being oppressed by the Arab Iraqis. I want independent Kurdistan to be a republic, unless a foreign prince marries a Kurdish woman and learns the Kurdish language.
Windemere

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Saddam Hussein was a brutal ruler, and he did commit genocide against the Kurdish people, by using poison gas when they rebelled against his regime. He also brutally suppressed the Shiites in southern Iraq.  Nor did he hesitate to use brutality against his own Sunnis if they opposed him.  He also had some family members ( his sons-in-law) liquidated, after he'd lured them back into Iraq. As for Saddam himself, those who live by the sword often die by the sword.  But I don't see anything wrong with  Jordan sheltering what remains of his family, which I think consists of his daughters and some grandchildren, as long as they refrain from supporting terrorism.
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azadi

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Originally Posted by Windemere
Saddam Hussein was a brutal ruler, and he did commit genocide against the Kurdish people, by using poison gas when they rebelled against his regime. He also brutally suppressed the Shiites in southern Iraq.  Nor did he hesitate to use brutality against his own Sunnis if they opposed him.  He also had some family members ( his sons-in-law) liquidated, after he'd lured them back into Iraq. As for Saddam himself, those who live by the sword often die by the sword.  But I don't see anything wrong with  Jordan sheltering what remains of his family, which I think consists of his daughters and some grandchildren. 

The Hashemite king of Jordan sheltering the family of Saddam is proof of the Hashemites not being friends of the Kurds. Raghad Hussein, the daughter of Saddam, who is sheltered by the Hashemite king of Jordan, is on the most wanted list of the government of Iraq. I don't support the abolition of the Hashemite monarchy of Jordan, because the Hashemites have been decent kings of Jordan, but the Hashemites don't deserve to rule Kurdistan. 
The majority of the Kurds are Sunni Muslims, but many Kurds are Zoroastrians, Yazidis or Kaka'is, and a few Kurds are Christians. Christian Kurds are traditionally Nestorians. I'm a Nestorian Christian Kurd. Nestorius, the founder of the Nestorian Church, was a Kurd from Kirkuk.
azadi

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According to some members of this forum, USA prevented the restoration of the Iraqi monarchy after the overthrow of Saddam. That's wrong. Monarchism was insignificant in Iraq during the Iraq War, and the vast majority of the Iraqis supported the establishment of a democratic republic after the fall of Saddam. The members of the forum, who claim, that USA prevented the restoration of the Iraqi monarchy, are likely conflating Iraq with Afghanistan. USA indeed prevented the restoration of the Afghan monarchy. The majority of the members of the Loya Jirga (the constituent assembly of Afghanistan) wanted to restore the Afghan monarchy in 2002, but USA made it clear, that it was unacceptable to USA. The Afghan monarchy not being restored was a disaster, because the Taliban would likely never have been revived, if the Afghan monarchy had been restored. Afghanistan is a lost cause today. Monarchism has been insignificant in Afghanistan since the death of Zahir Shah in 2007, and the republican government of Afghanistan is weak and unstable. The Taliban regaining power in Afghanistan is inevitable, if USA withdraws from Afghanistan. 
Wessexman

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Reply with quote  #20 
Nestorius was from KahramanmaraƟ, Turkey:

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Nestorius



To be honest, I think, given the long Kurdish self-rule in Iraqi Kurdistan, the oppression and ineptitude of multiple Iraqi governments, and the reasonably well-run nature of Iraqi Kurdistan, it probably would be a good idea for it to separate from the rest of Iraq. It has earned its right to independence. The Hashemites are still the rightful rulers of the rest of Iraq.
azadi

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Originally Posted by Wessexman
Nestorius was from KahramanmaraƟ, Turkey:

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Nestorius


It's true, but his ancestors were Kurds from Kirkuk according to an ancient tradition of the Nestorian Church. The Britannica article claims, that the parents of Nestorius were Persians, but the Kurds didn't exist as a distinct nation then. Kurdistan was part of the Sassanid Persian empire, when Nestorius was born, and while the inhabitants of Kurdistan spoke Northwestern Iranic languages (Kurdish is a Northwestern Iranic language, while Farsi (Persian) is a Southwestern Iranic language) during the Sassanid era, the inhabitants of Kurdistan identified as Persians during the Sassanid era.
Kurdish nationhood was formed during the Ottoman era, because the Kurds were the only Iranic people living in the Ottoman Empire. While the Kurds were loyal to the Ottoman Sultans, they were aware of being different from the Turks and the Arabs. The Iranian Kurds still identify as Iranians and while they want autonomy, they don't want to secede from Iran.



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