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DavidV

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We'll go through it this way, examining the prospects of current monarchist movements through Europe, and what of the prospects for restoration in the not -too-distant future. It's thus easy to separate it geographically given the different possibilities and priorities.

Balkans (and Georgia)

Still the most realistic prospect for restoration lies in Serbia, Montenegro, Albania, Bulgaria and Romania, as well as Georgia. In each of these there is a recognise claimant (in the case of Alexander II of Serbia particular, openly and unashamedly declaring in favour of restoration), significant public sentiment, and dreadful recent histories to be repudiated. So monarchists need to focus on these ones first. Greece is the exception given monarchist sentiment is weakest there and unlikely to change, even though people's view of Constantine II and his family is likely more positive now in light of Greece's current woes.

Portugal
In Western Europe, Portugal appears to be the best prospect in the not-too-distant future, not least because Portuguese monarchists have numerous favourable circumstances. First of these is a recognised claimant who actually wants restoration, a well-organised, visible and active monarchist movement able to utilise modern technology and innovative tactics, and a current national crisis that's discredited the existing political class.

Germany and Austria
Despite what their constitutions state, the cause is not entirely lost. In fact, I think there is potential in the longer term for a variety reasons. Firstly, German monarchists appear to have found better co-ordination and improved web presence resulting. Firstly, in Bavaria and Baden-W├╝rttemberg, monarchist sentiment has always been strongest and crypto-monarchist sentiments have been periodically expressed by politicians. But the potential in Germany lies in the younger generation, who aren't all hostile to idea. I think this may be explained by a certain countercultural aspect of monarchism- there are signs that Germans are tiring of the stifling PC and "defensive democracy" that's existed in the past six decades. In Austria, I suspect the same but what of the other former Habsburg lands?

Poland
Polish monarchism is quirky owing to the fact that there is no claimant, so monarchist groups function more like think-tanks than anything, despite the presence of monarchists in political life since the fall of Communism.

France
Same as usual- three currents, et al. How will monarchists vote in 2012, well...

Italy
Italian monarchism is even more complex given the different strains of monarchism dating back to 19th century struggles are still existing today- unionist, federalist and legitimist. More recently has been the chance to join the broad anti-Berlusconi movement.

Russia
Russian monarchism is varied. Before 1917 many currents of monarchism existed, from (relatively) liberal constitutionalists to ultra-conservative supporters of autocracy. And all those currents have been revived since 1991. A not insubstantial web presence I can see, varied activism which includes participating and supporting anti-Putin protests (the imperial flag has featured in some protests).
TheKaiserWilhelmII

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Reply with quote  #2 
The status in France... The Monarchy will be restored, overall it was very sucessful and lead France's Golden age throughout the early 18th century.

Vive le Roi,
William


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Aurelia

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Reply with quote  #3 
Well I'm Hungarian..

People are looking back on the dual monarchy with much nostalgia. But it's still a lost cause. Most people here don't have a problem with the idea of a monarchy. It's the dynasty.
The Habsburgs are not popular/loved here at all. They are mostly seen as "foreigners". Especially the ones before the Compromise.
Sometimes I talk to people about monarchism and they are like "Ok being a monarchy wouldn't be so bad.. but who would be the king? We don't have a royal house." And when I say we actually have - the Habsburgs, they look at me like I was insane. 

The Doctrine of the Holy Crown is a popular topic in (right wing) politics though.
Sujit

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Then you can tell them that most of the reigning royal houses are from German origin, but that don't stop us from saying that they are our monarch.
Peter

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Reply with quote  #5 
I'm aware of that attitude, but always felt it at least a little unjust. The Habsburgs did not just marry the Hungarian heiress and commence to reign. Most of Hungary at the time was in Turkish hands and had to be reconquered over generations, with much German/Austrian blood and treasure expended in the effort. I feel that the Habsburgs earned the right to the Hungarian crown. Though, sad to say, like you I doubt they will ever wear it again.
octava

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I wonder how the Hungarian people would feel about a princely family they do have in their history, the Esterhazy family.  They reined as princes for many generations.  

clark

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I think many of the central european states feel the same as Hungary. I have heard that Czech monarchists have some organization, but that the Habsburg family is reviled there...

In some circles of Galicians ( Ukrainian Galicia), there seems to be some nostalgia for the old Habsburg days. There is a blog ran by the Basilian priests that often posts positive things about the old Empire and the Ukrainian Catholic Church. That said, most Western Ukrainains are ukrainophiles and probably wouldn't want to be part of Austria- Hungary again, even if their national identity was preserved, promoted, and protected by the Habsburgs. A stark contrast to the soviet and polish rule of western Ukraine.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by clark
I think many of the central european states feel the same as Hungary. I have heard that Czech monarchists have some organization, but that the Habsburg family is reviled there...


Not so much in Moravia: http://moravane.eu/prohlaseni-strany-moravane-k%C2%A0vyroci-umrti-sveho-markrabete-karla-i/

Quote:
In some circles of Galicians ( Ukrainian Galicia), there seems to be some nostalgia for the old Habsburg days. There is a blog ran by the Basilian priests that often posts positive things about the old Empire and the Ukrainian Catholic Church. That said, most Western Ukrainains are ukrainophiles and probably wouldn't want to be part of Austria- Hungary again, even if their national identity was preserved, promoted, and protected by the Habsburgs. A stark contrast to the soviet and polish rule of western Ukraine.


Modern Ukrainian politics, religion and attitudes generally are shaped by pre-1918 borders to a degree. Western Ukraine has a larger Catholic population and tends to be the bastion of Ukrainian nationalism and, let's face it, Russophobia which is shared with Poland and the Baltic states. Hence it's also the centre of resistance to the Yanukovych dictatorship. It's not even a Catholic v Orthodox thing either, as there's two schismatic Orthodox churches!
gianni

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Reply with quote  #9 

Dear DavidV,

 

I refer to your interesting analysis dated  03/09/12.

 

I red to day that on the France weekly magazine  "Point de vue"   there is  an interview  to the Crown Prince  Leka II  of Albania.

I red it  in italian translation  on the  website of italian monarchist   
http://www.monarchia.it/news.html#lekaelia
 

 

It seems  that in Albania  there is  good possibility of a restoration of the Kingdom.

 

What do you think ?

 

Best regards.

Gianni

DavidV

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Reply with quote  #10 
Well, Albania has come closest in that it's the only post-Communist state where restoration was put to a referendum. It failed, unfortunately, but this was due in no small part to the fact the country was in turmoil and the referendum could not have been conducted honestly. The current conservative PM Sali Berisha (whose coalition does include monarchist groups) has said that it's not a closed issue because of that, thus keeping hopes alive and well.
gianni

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Reply with quote  #11 

Yes, DavidV,  you are right.

But not only ; they told me that in first time Monarchy did win the referendum ;  only in the following night something strange happened and republic resulted winner ;   something  very similar to what happened in Italy in 1946. . . . . . .    People was for Monarchy,  but the political parties,  well organized,  were for republic.   

Gianni

DavidV

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Reply with quote  #12 
Showing the youthful appeal of monarchy:
http://causamonarquica.com/2012/04/11/monarquia-o-ideal-ainda-reina-no-coracao-de-alguns-jovens/
https://www.facebook.com/notes/vigo-branner/a-toi-qui-vote/315217405215812
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