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DavidV

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Reply with quote  #121 
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-3667054/Still-sneering-Britain-boozy-bully-sums-s-rotten-EU.html#ixzz4D3U9ihLl

I feel sorry for Luxembourg. A very likeable little country with a lovely Grand Ducal Family, is destined to be associated with this odious man whose arrogance not only drove Britain to rebel against the EU, but also may yet seal its demise.


Peter

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Reply with quote  #122 
The most shocking revelation here about Juncker? The man keeps malt whisky in the fridge!!! Barbarian. At least it wasn't explicitly stated that he puts ice in it, but no further perversity could surprise me after that abomination was revealed. I believe Monaco and Liechtenstein both have higher GDP per capita than Luxembourg, and while you could argue that due to their tiny populations they should not be included in any comparisons, it would be both easy and reasonable to say the same about Luxembourg, which has just 0.11% of the (current) EU population. Going on from this, the tax avoidance schemes centered in Luxembourg (or Liechtenstein) don't bother me so long as they are at least technically legal, I've never felt that either individuals or companies have any duty to organise their affairs for the taxman's benefit. In all, the article was a thoroughly enjoyable piece of spleen-venting, but not all that serious a contribution to the debate. I did enjoy it, though, so thanks.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #123 
Don't get me wrong. We on here love small states like Luxembourg, Monaco, Liechtenstein and San Marino. They are remnants of a bygone era which, if anything, ought to underline exactly why a bloated superstate is a bad idea.

You cannot have lasting prosperity without liberty and security. The EU and the elites are making this impossible. And while the EU right now is not threatening monarchies, or trying to force the social and cultural liberal agenda onto all its member states (and is or will likely encounter stiff resistance especially from Eastern Europe), there is no guarantee that it won't in the future. If a democratically-elected government legislated to restrict or outlaw abortion (some European countries, like Poland, have done this), the EU might one day hypothetically overturn it even if it contradicts the wishes of national governments and the people. Or may even enforce "hate speech" laws throughout the EU. Or other things usually in the name of "human rights" (a term increasingly perverted by Cultural Marxism), "equality" or "diversity". THIS is the inherent danger of the EU superstate and this is why it must collapse.

Even if there isn't much chance of that happening now, it's simply not worth the risk, end of story.
Peter

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Reply with quote  #124 
Today as it happens is the 17th anniversary of the beginning of devolved government in Scotland, as the Queen opened the first session of the Scottish Parliament and powers were transferred to the Scottish Executive. Blair and Brown (both Scots, as is often forgotten due to Blair's chameleon-like adoption of an English accent) thought they were creating a Labour fiefdom with plenty of jobs for the boys. That worked out well, didn't it. It might be wondered how Scottish voters came to approve the creation of several additional layers of bureaucracy and a whole raft of politicians with inflated titles and pumped-up egos, all to be maintained at public expense. When you reflect that it was the English public's expense the choice becomes more understandable.

Devolution was of course only one aspect of the shambles made of the Constitution by this disgraceful dyarchy. Yet a friend to whom I remarked on this years ago had a point: 'They had every right to do it. It said right in the Labour manifesto that if you elect us, we'll make a shambles of the Constitution.' It did, too. Ah, the invincible wisdom of electorates.
Peter

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Reply with quote  #125 
When Ireland was admitted to the European Communities, as the EU then was, abortion was illegal there. it is still illegal there, and the law has if anything been strengthened in the interim. I am as you know generally in favour of hate speech laws and human rights legislation, though like anything these can go too far and specific cases may be ill-advised. I don't see anything wrong with an organisation imposing minimum, commonly-agreed standards of behaviour on its members, though revision of these standards should be under members' control and those who cannot accept a particular change should be free to quit. It is all a matter of nuance and balance, like most things in life.

I like small states too, particularly if they are monarchies. Though the only such state I have spent any significant time in happens to be San Marino, a delightful place if tough on the legs, appearing to possess not one square inch of level ground. I have no more than passed through Luxembourg and never set foot in the other three. Though now I think of it I do know Malta very well and love it to bits; for some reason it is never included in this category even though it is actually smaller than Luxembourg both area- and population-wise. In fact, it is smaller by area than Andorra! Shame it didn't stay a Commonwealth realm, though, particularly with the personal ties between the islands and the Queen. But I'm rambling, I appear to be in a funny mood this morning (what else is new, some might say). Better quit before I dig myself in too deep.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #126 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter
Today as it happens is the 17th anniversary of the beginning of devolved government in Scotland, as the Queen opened the first session of the Scottish Parliament and powers were transferred to the Scottish Executive. Blair and Brown (both Scots, as is often forgotten due to Blair's chameleon-like adoption of an English accent) thought they were creating a Labour fiefdom with plenty of jobs for the boys. That worked out well, didn't it. It might be wondered how Scottish voters came to approve the creation of several additional layers of bureaucracy and a whole raft of politicians with inflated titles and pumped-up egos, all to be maintained at public expense. When you reflect that it was the English public's expense the choice becomes more understandable.

Devolution was of course only one aspect of the shambles made of the Constitution by this disgraceful dyarchy. Yet a friend to whom I remarked on this years ago had a point: 'They had every right to do it. It said right in the Labour manifesto that if you elect us, we'll make a shambles of the Constitution.' It did, too. Ah, the invincible wisdom of electorates.


In theory there's nothing wrong with devolution and decentralisation. However the problem lies in the fact that Labour in Scotland and more recently the SNP have long built power bases by exploiting the fact that Scottish society (especially in the West of Scotland) is tribal and sectarian in character, given its close links to Northern Ireland. As a follower of and expert on football who has written extensively on the sport, I am familiar with the sectarianism that plagues Scotland. More dangerously, the SNP appears increasingly enmeshed with Irish Republican sympathies as a result.

This creates a dangerous situation that is likely to mean that any possible break-up of the Union, as I've said a billion times, is not going to be peaceful. It could potentially trigger a revival of sectarian violence, which is also why the Republic of Ireland will not welcome it either.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #127 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter
When Ireland was admitted to the European Communities, as the EU then was, abortion was illegal there. it is still illegal there, and the law has if anything been strengthened in the interim. I am as you know generally in favour of hate speech laws and human rights legislation, though like anything these can go too far and specific cases may be ill-advised. I don't see anything wrong with an organisation imposing minimum, commonly-agreed standards of behaviour on its members, though revision of these standards should be under members' control and those who cannot accept a particular change should be free to quit. It is all a matter of nuance and balance, like most things in life.

I like small states too, particularly if they are monarchies. Though the only such state I have spent any significant time in happens to be San Marino, a delightful place if tough on the legs, appearing to possess not one square inch of level ground. I have no more than passed through Luxembourg and never set foot in the other three. Though now I think of it I do know Malta very well and love it to bits; for some reason it is never included in this category even though it is actually smaller than Luxembourg both area- and population-wise. In fact, it is smaller by area than Andorra! Shame it didn't stay a Commonwealth realm, though, particularly with the personal ties between the islands and the Queen. But I'm rambling, I appear to be in a funny mood this morning (what else is new, some might say). Better quit before I dig myself in too deep.


Malta has no dynasty of its own but was a sovereign state as the SMOM (Knights of St John or Knights of Malta), which still exists and has diplomatic relations with a number of countries including Malta itself.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #128 
Meanwhile, a photo of three of the heroes of Brexit, Jacob Rees-Mogg, Kate Hoey and Nigel Farage:

http://h7.alamy.com/comp/G2X5Y5/left-right-conservative-mp-jacob-rees-mogg-labour-mp-kate-hoey-and-G2X5Y5.jpg

Poland warns the EU:
http://www.express.co.uk/news/politics/685671/EU-referendum-Poland-Angela-Merkel-punishing-Britain-destroy-Brussels-Jaroslaw-Kaczynski

Remainers (or Remainiacs) still indignant:
http://www.breitbart.com/london/2016/07/02/london-eu-protest/

In somewhat related news (seeing that Brexit is a win for us over anti-British enemies), an SNP MP makes a vile statement about the Somme commemorations:
http://www.deadlinenews.co.uk/2016/07/01/mcgarry-branded-disgusting-somme-cannon-fodder-comment/

And Corbyn was PAID to appear on the Iranian regime's propaganda arm Press TV:
http://www.businessinsider.com.au/jeremy-corbyn-paid-iran-press-tv-tortured-journalist-2016-6?r=UK&IR=T
DutchMonarchist

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Reply with quote  #129 
Nigel Farage has resigned as leader of UKIP.

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/jul/04/nigel-farage-resigns-as-ukip-leader

He had announced plans to resign before, so this isn't that much of a surprise. However, critics are wondering if he shouldn't stay until Britain is really out of the UK and doing well on its own. I also find it strange that leaders of the Brexit campaign seem to be leaving the political stage so soon.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #130 
Angela Merkel, who to her credit seems to accept reality, blasts Juncker:
http://www.express.co.uk/news/politics/685809/EU-referendum-Angela-Merkel-sack-Brussels-chief-Jean-Claude-Juncker-Brexit-gloating
Wessexman

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Reply with quote  #131 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DutchMonarchist
Nigel Farage has resigned as leader of UKIP.

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/jul/04/nigel-farage-resigns-as-ukip-leader

He had announced plans to resign before, so this isn't that much of a surprise. However, critics are wondering if he shouldn't stay until Britain is really out of the UK and doing well on its own. I also find it strange that leaders of the Brexit campaign seem to be leaving the political stage so soon.


These critics are idiots or, as likely, remain ideologues trying to score political points with the support of their media cronies. They don't seem to realise, or admit, the referendum was not a general election. The leave campaign is not going to form government. The Tories are still the largest party in the Commons. Farage was UKIP leader. UKIP has one MP. He isn't in a position to guide Britain through Brexit. I'm not enthusiastic about UKIP or Farage, but it would be better to have them in government than the Tories, but it isn't going to happen right now.

It is Cameron and Osborne who should have actually done some preparation. They don't seem to have considered that they might have lost and what to do if they did.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #132 
Remember people, that Brexit does not belong to one leader, party or group. It is a grassroots mass movement that encompasses all across the spectrum.
Wessexman

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Reply with quote  #133 
Very good commentary by Peter Hitchens:

http://hitchensblog.mailonsunday.co.uk/2016/07/why-blairites-would-rather-be-led-by-theresa-may-than-by-jeremy-corbyn.html#comments

Here are the frank dissections of the campaign by remainers that he quotes.

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/jul/05/how-remain-failed-inside-story-doomed-campaign
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jul/04/post-referendum-politics-eu-vote

DavidV

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Reply with quote  #134 


The list of Americans who welcome Brexit includes Donald Trump, Newt Gingrich, Mike Huckabee, John Bolton, Jim DeMint and Rudy Giuliani. Much more impressive than the list of those pushing for Remain like Barrack Obama, John Kerry, Hillary Clinton, John McCain and Bernie Sanders!
VivatReginaScottorum

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Reply with quote  #135 
I'm not sure I'd agree that the list of Yankee Brexiteers is especially impressive. Frankly their approval depresses me.
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That which concerns the mystery of the King's power is not lawful to be disputed; for that is to wade into the weakness of Princes, and to take away the mystical reverence that belongs unto them that sit in the throne of God. - James VI and I of England, Scotland and Ireland
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