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DavidV

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I call attention to the motion passed by the Canadian Senate earlier this month, calling for the release of Iranian lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh:
http://www.facebook.com/FreeIranWave/posts/125762350915920

Nasrin Sotoudeh is a female lawyer who has defended dissidents, currently in jail and recently ended a 49-day hunger strike.

Furthermore, sanctions being imposed include freezing any assets of regime thugs such as the Basij and Revolutionary Guards:
http://shiro-khorshid-forever.blogspot.ca/2012/12/canada-targets-revolutionary-guards-and.html

The Iranian people do not need direct outside intervention for regime change. What the Iranian people need is global solidarity, they need the moral, spiritual and intellectual support, collectively, as had been the case in Eastern Europe. The impending downfall of the Assad regime in Syria will be a great blow to the Islamic Republic of Iran, as its only Arab ally and key channel between it and terrorist scum like Hezbollah. It should give impetus for Iranians to begin their own uprising to overthrow this wicked regime.

http://www.facebook.com/pahlavireza/events

Furthermore, this weekend will see candlelight vigils for Iranian political prisoners. I urge you to pray for prisoners and the many victims of this regime. Good must overcome evil with all our support.

As the first FB link showed, someone praises Canada as the "new leader of the free world". Could it be that the Canadian government has shown some moral courage on this, compared to most Western governments?
NeasOlc

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10 years ago this kind of backbone would have been unimaginable in Canada.

jovan66102

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NeasOlc
10 years ago this kind of backbone would have been unimaginable in Canada.



How true! God bless Canada!

__________________
'Monarchy can easily be ‘debunked;' but watch the faces, mark the accents of the debunkers. These are the men whose tap-root in Eden has been cut: whom no rumour of the polyphony, the dance, can reach - men to whom pebbles laid in a row are more beautiful than an arch. Yet even if they desire equality, they cannot reach it. Where men are forbidden to honour a king they honour millionaires, athletes or film-stars instead: even famous prostitutes or gangsters. For spiritual nature, like bodily nature, will be served; deny it food and it will gobble poison.' C.S. Lewis God save Her Majesty Elizabeth the Second, by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom, Canada and Her other Realms and Territories Queen, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith, etc.! Vive le Très haut, très puissant et très excellent Prince, Louis XX, Par la grâce de Dieu, Roi de France et de Navarre, Roi Très-chrétien!
CaesarII

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Yes, with Assad gone Iran will lose it's more moderate Shi-ite ally and gain a unstable, fanatical Wahabi-Sunni neighbour (who will probably be in the pay of the Saudis). How wonderful.

DavidV

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And the crimes of Assad and his allies in Lebanon do not matter?
The Zahle massacre and the Mountain War?
The murder of Bachir Gemayel?
The murder of Hassan Khaled?
The murder of Rene Moawad?
The murder of Dany Chamoun?
The murder of Rafic al-Hariri?
The three-decade plus long occupation of Lebanon?
The resistance of Lebanese Forces to occupation?
The fact that nearly all assassinated Lebanese public figures have been Christian or Sunni, and opponents of Syrian control of Lebanon?
Hezbollah, a vile terrorist scum militia possibly involved in many of the recent murders?

The Islamic Republic of Iran is the enemy of all we stand for, including monarchy. Just look at its vile propaganda. It has to be brought down from within, and invariably whatever replaces it will be a definite improvement for its own people and the world.
CaesarII

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Whatever Assad has done is nothing that the Wahabis are not capable of, and more besides. Assad's crimes were for political gain, not religious fanaticism. The latter is far more dangerous. 

Do you really expect that with Assad deposed will come democracy, freedom, puppies, Wal-Mart and the American Dream? That's what happened in Egypt and Libya, right? Whatever the western masses who get their information from CNN might think, revolutions to overthrow (relatively) moderate despots are not followed by peace and security.

Iran is a vile state, but that does not justify replacing its more moderate allies with extremists of a different colour. And that's exactly what will happen- the Free Syrian Army is a predominately Sunni Islamic organization, fighting for Islamic ideals against a secular government (and yes, Assad is about as secular is an Arab despot can get). This will be a victory against the Shi'ites who tyrannize over Iran, yes, but in favour of an equally-vile state, Saudi Arabia, which bankrolls Wahabism.

The thing that will break the rule of the Ayatollahs is internal instability, not an external ideological foe. 

CaesarII

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Actually, I detest the Saudis more than even the Ayatollahs.

And Israel ought to get stung for being the proverbial kid who pokes the beehive with a stick. One day the Israelis may wake to find that the beast they are now feeding Syria to will, given time and some more Saudi funding, be grinning at them from across the Jordan.

head_statue

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NATO has said it wanted to preserve the infrastructure of the syrian state and army, and to try to force Assad to resign. The state department had aldo designated jahbat al nusra as a terrorist group.

There are people spreading ridiculous conspiracy theories on how nato is backing al qaeda in syria or that america is handing out heavy weapons to everyone who calls themselves a rebel. I think NATO has been quite controlled, and i have criticized israel but i don't believe they are doing anything in syria or supporting the opposition at all except their continued occupation of the golan heights.

Some people are also uploading videos of jahbat al nusra to youtube and falsely labeling them as "free syrian army". Jahbat al nusra do not have any women or girls at their demonstrations and only use a black flag which says jahbat al nusra right on it, not any other flags or banners.
DavidV

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Quote:
Originally Posted by head_statue
NATO has said it wanted to preserve the infrastructure of the syrian state and army, and to try to force Assad to resign. The state department had aldo designated jahbat al nusra as a terrorist group.

There are people spreading ridiculous conspiracy theories on how nato is backing al qaeda in syria or that america is handing out heavy weapons to everyone who calls themselves a rebel. I think NATO has been quite controlled, and i have criticized israel but i don't believe they are doing anything in syria or supporting the opposition at all except their continued occupation of the golan heights.

Some people are also uploading videos of jahbat al nusra to youtube and falsely labeling them as "free syrian army". Jahbat al nusra do not have any women or girls at their demonstrations and only use a black flag which says jahbat al nusra right on it, not any other flags or banners.


All true. What we are talking about are essentially sectarian, tribal or feudal societies with a complex network of alliances that cut across national borders and sectarian lines (see Lebanon), some dating back even before present-day national borders were drawn up. And we've seen plenty of activity of Kurds, Assyrians and Syriac organisations in the opposition movement. It's also why pro-Assad groups and their Lebanese allies, though weakened, will survive politically as they can reorganise within the tribal structure. Of course, it never hurts to point out that such societies are far better managed by monarchies than either a "democratic" republic or dictatorships.

Likewise, I've offered criticisms of both Israel and Saudi Arabia, for varying reasons, but this isn't what it's about here.

What's more this had originally been about Iran, and yes I agree that it will not take any external intervention (which I am explicitly against) but a combination of internal weaknesses and internal resistance. The key is to establish a unity of purpose among the resistance movements. Just as it was in Eastern Europe, see the example of Poland.
head_statue

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Hizb ut tahrir is also still banned in Saudi Arabia, because they want to overthrow every single government in the world and turn it into a caliphate and that especially includes saudi arabia, where mecca and medina is located. Some of them had stated it would be a mockery if they established a caliphate without conquering saudi arabia, because the "caliph" would need permission from the saudi king to enter mecca for pilgramage.

Hizb ut tahrir also opposes assad and they probably have people on the ground there too. Jahbat al nusra is openly calling for a caliphate, the last time the ottoman "caliphate", was around, saudi arabia fought against it.

Saudi arabia patronizes people whom it can control. Just because they agree that people's hands should be chopped off for theft, that people should be beheaded etc. does not mean that they support every islamist. It would suffer massive blowblack too, the saudi monarchy is very concerned about its own future and staying in power.

Omar Bakri, Abu Hamza and other caliphatists spoke out against the saudi monarchy. While azzam.com was operating, it had a section accusing saudi arabia of sodomizing returning mujahideen from bosnia. azzam.com is still available on the wayback machine in the internet archive.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #11 
I believe it was the Hashemites who last claimed the caliphate, and then lost the Battle of Mecca in 1924. History would have been different if they had won, or for that matter, if the Kingdom of Syria and the Kingdom of Kurdistan had been allowed to stand. Just the same as I feel about the German Empire or Kingdom of Italy, neither of which were ideal. There is difference between accepting something on pragmatic grounds, and supporting something out of principle.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #12 
Candles that read "freedom":
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