Monarchy Forum
Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
azadi

Registered:
Posts: 632
Reply with quote  #1 
Russia and Turkey have agreed on a deal, which will remove YPG (the armed wing of PYD) from the Kurdish regions of Syria. Russia and Turkey will conduct joint patrols in the Kurdish regions of Syria. PKK/PYD will finally be eliminated in Syria, and Turkish ethnic cleansing of the Syrian Kurds will be prevented. It's wonderful news. 
https://www.rudaw.net/english/middleeast/syria/221020195


KURDISTAN AND RUSSIA MUST REMAIN FRIENDS FOREVER!

1280px-Flag_of_Kurdistan.svg.png  510px-Flag_of_Russia.svg.png 
1_wSr2xH5SKhwbMc_advaY6Q.png 

InVinoVeritas

Registered:
Posts: 27
Reply with quote  #2 
Although I support the crushing of the Kurdish communists (or whatever they call themselves), I find it hard to share your enthusiasm for Russia. Modern Russia is an heir of the Soviet Union, with a Chekist at the helm. This situation is in no way different from the Bolsheviks crushing the Makhnovshchina.
__________________
"Democratic governments are not suited to the publication of the thunderous revelations I am in the habit of making. The unpublished parts will appear later … when Europe will have restored its traditional monarchies." -Salvador Dalí, Diary of a Genius (1964)
azadi

Registered:
Posts: 632
Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by InVinoVeritas
Although I support the crushing of the Kurdish communists (or whatever they call themselves), I find it hard to share your enthusiasm for Russia. Modern Russia is an heir of the Soviet Union, with a Chekist at the helm. This situation is in no way different from the Bolsheviks crushing the Makhnovshchina.

The Putin government isn't Communist. Putin rejects state atheism, and he supports the Russian Orthodox Church. Private enterprise is allowed to exist in Russia today, and the flag of Tsarist Russia has been restored. The Romanovs is allowed to return to Russia, if they want to. It's true, that the Putin government promotes Stalinist nostalgia, but actions speaks louder than words.
Criticizing the Putin government for corruption, lack of democracy and lack of rule of law is justified, but claiming, that it's Communist, is nonsense.
I'm a Russophile. I love Russian culture, and the Russian monarchy is my favourite former monarchy. I'm an Eastern Christian. I'm a Kurd, and the Kurds have traditionally had friendly relations with Russia. A lot of Kurds live in Russia. The KRG (the non-Communist autonomous regional government of South (Iraqi) Kurdistan) enjoys friendly relations with Russia. 

InVinoVeritas

Registered:
Posts: 27
Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by azadi

The Putin government isn't Communist. Putin rejects state atheism, and he supports the Russian Orthodox Church. Private enterprise is allowed to exist in Russia today, and the flag of Tsarist Russia has been restored. The Romanovs is allowed to return to Russia, if they want to. It's true, that the Putin government promotes Stalinist nostalgia, but actions speaks louder than words.
Criticizing the Putin government for corruption, lack of democracy and lack of rule of law is justified, but claiming, that it's Communist, is nonsense.
I'm a Russophile. I love Russian culture, and the Russian monarchy is my favourite former monarchy. I'm an Eastern Christian. I'm a Kurd, and the Kurds have traditionally had friendly relations with Russia. A lot of Kurds live in Russia. The KRG (the non-Communist autonomous regional government of South (Iraqi) Kurdistan) enjoys friendly relations with Russia. 



Perhaps I should have been clearer with my words. I'm not claiming Russia to be a Marxist state, but I do think it is still ruled by the same (kind of) people. Even their church was founded under the orders of Stalin. The rest is just populism. I mean, if Putin really thinks so highly of the Romanovs, why doesn't he even attempt to restore their crown?

As an endnote, I do admit my bias. As a Finn, why should I support a country that discriminates against my Uralic brethren? The martyrdom of Albert Razin is still fresh in my mind.

__________________
"Democratic governments are not suited to the publication of the thunderous revelations I am in the habit of making. The unpublished parts will appear later … when Europe will have restored its traditional monarchies." -Salvador Dalí, Diary of a Genius (1964)
azadi

Registered:
Posts: 632
Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by InVinoVeritas


Perhaps I should have been clearer with my words. I'm not claiming Russia to be a Marxist state, but I do think it is still ruled by the same (kind of) people. Even their church was founded under the orders of Stalin. The rest is just populism. I mean, if Putin really thinks so highly of the Romanovs, why doesn't he even attempt to restore their crown?

As an endnote, I do admit my bias. As a Finn, why should I support a country that discriminates against my Uralic brethren? The martyrdom of Albert Razin is still fresh in my mind.

Claiming, that the Russian Orthodox Church was founded by Stalin is wrong. Stalin brutally persecuted the Russian Orthodox Church until Hitler's invasion of Russia. Stalin ended the persecution of the Russian Orthodox Church in order to gain the support of the Russian people during the Great Patriotic War. The Communist regime remained anti-religious and supported anti-religious propaganda until 1988, when Mikhail Gorbachev reconciled with the Russian Orthodox Church and abandoned state atheism.
It's true, that Putin was a member of the KGB, but he was never a high-ranking member of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, and he joined the KGB for patriotic reasons rather than for ideological reasons. I have never claimed, that Putin is a monarchist. It was Boris Yeltsin, not Putin, who restored the flag of Tsarist Russia. But some prominent supporters of Putin, including Sergey Aksyonov, the governor of Crimea, and Vsevolod Chaplin, a prominent Russian Orthodox clergyman, wants to restore the Russian monarchy.
I have never claimed, that criticizing the Putin government is wrong. It's true, that corruption is widespread in Russia, and that the rule of law is weak in Russia. The Putin government is definitely authoritarian and Russia isn't a real democracy, despite Putin allowing limited political pluralism. But modern Russia is far better than the USSR, and I prefer the Putin government to Western globalist liberalism. I'm strongly opposed to a federal Europe and mass immigration, and I'm opposed to gay marriage. 
The languages of the ethnic minorities of Russia is granted official status in the autonomous republics of Russia, while the Kurdish language is denied any official status in Turkey.
InVinoVeritas

Registered:
Posts: 27
Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by azadi

Claiming, that the Russian Orthodox Church was founded by Stalin is wrong. Stalin brutally persecuted the Russian Orthodox Church until Hitler's invasion of Russia. Stalin ended the persecution of the Russian Orthodox Church in order to gain the support of the Russian people during the Great Patriotic War. The Communist regime remained anti-religious and supported anti-religious propaganda until 1988, when Mikhail Gorbachev reconciled with the Russian Orthodox Church and abandoned state atheism.
It's true, that Putin was a member of the KGB, but he was never a high-ranking member of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, and he joined the KGB for patriotic reasons rather than for ideological reasons. I have never claimed, that Putin is a monarchist. It was Boris Yeltsin, not Putin, who restored the flag of Tsarist Russia. But some prominent supporters of Putin, including Sergey Aksyonov, the governor of Crimea, and Vsevolod Chaplin, a prominent Russian Orthodox clergyman, wants to restore the Russian monarchy.
The languages of the ethnic minorities of Russia is granted official status in the autonomous republics of Russia, while the Kurdish language is denied any official status in Turkey. 


First of all, I apologize for being a bit unclear on certain points. I am a bit sick right now and I'm having a hard time keeping my thoughts together.

As far as I know, the Russian Orthodox Church has it's roots in the official Soviet one. Some more or less "traditionalist" voices within the church don't change the fact that it still remains mostly a Kremlin pawn, just like under Stalin. I mean, just look at the support revolutionary republican governments like Syria and Iran have in the church just because they're buddies with the Putin regime. Absolutely sickening.

Okay, let's assume for a moment that you're right, that Putin joined the KGB for "patriotic" reasons. Patriotism towards what, may I ask? My guess is, it's not Russia as culture and tradition, as beauty. Such loyalty to state I would not call patriotism, but statism. If the Algerians in France took control of the country and established a strong state, they would find their greatest support among the likes of Putin. Is that patriotism to you?

The situation of Russia's native peoples might not be as bad as that of the Kurds in Turkey yet, but that doesn't mean it's not bad. The situation there is gradually getting worse and worse. If someone burns himself to death over his right to speak his native tongue and practice his native culture, I would say he's probably denied that right to some extent.

__________________
"Democratic governments are not suited to the publication of the thunderous revelations I am in the habit of making. The unpublished parts will appear later … when Europe will have restored its traditional monarchies." -Salvador Dalí, Diary of a Genius (1964)
azadi

Registered:
Posts: 632
Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by InVinoVeritas


First of all, I apologize for being a bit unclear on certain points. I am a bit sick right now and I'm having a hard time keeping my thoughts together.

As far as I know, the Russian Orthodox Church has it's roots in the official Soviet one. Some more or less "traditionalist" voices within the church don't change the fact that it still remains mostly a Kremlin pawn, just like under Stalin. I mean, just look at the support revolutionary republican governments like Syria and Iran have in the church just because they're buddies with the Putin regime. Absolutely sickening.

Okay, let's assume for a moment that you're right, that Putin joined the KGB for "patriotic" reasons. Patriotism towards what, may I ask? My guess is, it's not Russia as culture and tradition, as beauty. Such loyalty to state I would not call patriotism, but statism. If the Algerians in France took control of the country and established a strong state, they would find their greatest support among the likes of Putin. Is that patriotism to you?

The situation of Russia's native peoples might not be as bad as that of the Kurds in Turkey yet, but that doesn't mean it's not bad. The situation there is gradually getting worse and worse. If someone burns himself to death over his right to speak his native tongue and practice his native culture, I would say he's probably denied that right to some extent.

Claiming, that the relationship between state and church in modern Russia is similar to the relationship between state and church in Soviet Russia is nonsense. While the Soviet regime tolerated the Russian Orthodox Church after 1941, it remained anti-religious and supported anti-religious propaganda. Putin supports the Russian Orthodox Church and claims to be a practicing Orthodox Christian. The Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia, the church of the White emigres, reconciled with the Moscow Patriarchate in 2007. Attacking the Russian Orthodox Church for cooperating with the Soviet regime in order to survive is unfair.
Putin has never been an ideological Communist. He is first and foremost a Russian nationalist. He is actually a moderate Russian nationalist compared to the Russian ultra-nationalists.
I prefer the Assad regime to PKK/PYD and the Islamist Syrian rebels. The Assad regime is secularist and it isn't Communist. Hafez al-Assad, the father of the current President of Syria, was an ally of the USSR, but he wasn't a Communist. He didn't support state atheism, he rejected collectivization of agriculture and he supported a moderate version of socialism. He nationalized banks and heavy industry, but allowed private enterprise to exist in Syria. Bashar al-Assad has liberalized the economy of Syria. I vote for the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan, which is one of the two major political parties of the KRG (the autonomous regional government of South (Iraqi) Kurdistan). The Patriotic Union of Kurdistan is a secularist social democratic party, which supports Kurdish independence from Iraq. The Patriotic Union of Kurdistan was pro-Soviet during the Cold War, while not being Communist, and it remains pro-Russian today.
InVinoVeritas

Registered:
Posts: 27
Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by azadi

Claiming, that the relationship between state and church in modern Russia is similar to the relationship between state and church in Soviet Russia is nonsense. While the Soviet regime tolerated the Russian Orthodox Church after 1941, it remained anti-religious and supported anti-religious propaganda. Putin supports the Russian Orthodox Church and claims to be a practicing Orthodox Christian. The Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia, the church of the White emigres, reconciled with the Moscow Patriarchate in 2007. Attacking the Russian Orthodox Church for cooperating with the Soviet regime in order to survive is unfair.
Putin has never been an ideological Communist. He is first and foremost a Russian nationalist. He is actually a moderate Russian nationalist compared to the Russian ultra-nationalists.
I prefer the Assad regime to PKK/PYD and the Islamist Syrian rebels. The Assad regime is secularist and it isn't Communist. Hafez al-Assad, the father of the current President of Syria, was an ally of the USSR, but he wasn't a Communist. He didn't support state atheism, he rejected collectivization of agriculture and he supported a moderate version of socialism. He nationalized banks and heavy industry, but allowed private enterprise to exist in Syria. Bashar al-Assad has liberalized the economy of Syria. I vote for the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan, which is one of the two major political parties of the KRG (the autonomous regional government of South (Iraqi) Kurdistan). The Patriotic Union of Kurdistan is a secularist social democratic party, which supports Kurdish independence from Iraq. The Patriotic Union of Kurdistan was pro-Soviet during the Cold War, while not being Communist, and it remains pro-Russian today.


The relationship between state and church in Russia is similar to the one between state and church in the USSR in the respect that the church very loyally supports state positions. Only a part of the ROCOR reconciled with the Russian Orthodox Church. And besides, what does survival even mean when the message gets tainted so badly?

I never claimed Putin to be a communist. What I do, however, claim is that Putin's "patriotism" is highly questionable. If one feels loyalty towards a state such as the Soviet Union, I don't think one can be a loyal Russian patriot.

I never claimed Assad to be a communist either. There are other kinds of republicans besides communists. True, the Assad regime is secular, I'll admit that. However, what do you think would happen to a priest who dared speak against the regime's atrocities? And what do you think would happen to someone who openly supports the restoration of the monarchy?

__________________
"Democratic governments are not suited to the publication of the thunderous revelations I am in the habit of making. The unpublished parts will appear later … when Europe will have restored its traditional monarchies." -Salvador Dalí, Diary of a Genius (1964)
azadi

Registered:
Posts: 632
Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by InVinoVeritas


The relationship between state and church in Russia is similar to the one between state and church in the USSR in the respect that the church very loyally supports state positions. Only a part of the ROCOR reconciled with the Russian Orthodox Church. And besides, what does survival even mean when the message gets tainted so badly?

I never claimed Putin to be a communist. What I do, however, claim is that Putin's "patriotism" is highly questionable. If one feels loyalty towards a state such as the Soviet Union, I don't think one can be a loyal Russian patriot.

I never claimed Assad to be a communist either. There are other kinds of republicans besides communists. True, the Assad regime is secular, I'll admit that. However, what do you think would happen to a priest who dared speak against the regime's atrocities? And what do you think would happen to someone who openly supports the restoration of the monarchy?

The Russian Orthodox Church has always been loyal to the governments of Russia. The Russian Orthodox Church loyally supported the Tsars. Claiming, that the Russian Orthodox clergy aren't sincere Christians, because the Russian Orthodox Church cooperated with the Soviet regime, is outrageous. The church surviving is extremely important in order to keep the traditions of the church alive and to raise the children as Christians. The vast majority of the ROCOR reconciled with the Russian Orthodox Church. Only a few small splinter groups rejected reconciliation with the Russian Orthodox Church.
Putin doesn't ban monarchism in Russia. Sergey Aksyonov, the governor of Crimea, is a monarchist, and Vsevolod Chaplin, a prominent Russian Orthodox clergyman, who supports Putin, is a monarchist. 
I'm not terribly fond of the Assad regime, but it's far better than the PKK/PYD and the Islamist Syrian rebels. A non-Communist secularist republican dictatorship is far better than a Communist regime or an Islamist regime. Attacking the Assad regime for being republican makes no sense, because Hafez al-Assad didn't overthrow a king. Syria was a republic before Hafez al-Assad took power. 
InVinoVeritas

Registered:
Posts: 27
Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by azadi

The Russian Orthodox Church has always been loyal to the governments of Russia. The Russian Orthodox Church loyally supported the Tsars. Claiming, that the Russian Orthodox clergy aren't sincere Christians, because the Russian Orthodox Church cooperated with the Soviet regime, is outrageous. The church surviving is extremely important in order to keep the traditions of the church alive and to raise the children as Christians. The vast majority of the ROCOR reconciled with the Russian Orthodox Church. Only a few small splinter groups rejected reconciliation with the Russian Orthodox Church.
Putin doesn't ban monarchism in Russia. Sergey Aksyonov, the governor of Crimea, is a monarchist, and Vsevolod Chaplin, a prominent Russian Orthodox clergyman, who supports Putin, is a monarchist. 
I'm not terribly fond of the Assad regime, but it's far better than the PKK/PYD and the Islamist Syrian rebels. A non-Communist secularist republican dictatorship is far better than a Communist regime or an Islamist regime. Attacking the Assad regime for being republican makes no sense, because Hafez al-Assad didn't overthrow a king. Syria was a republic before Hafez al-Assad took power. 


Well, the Russian Orthodox Church should really think of it's priorities. After all, what's more important, existence or ideals? "Where are you going?" "To Rome to be crucified again." They should have condemned the Soviet Union. I can't say if a vast majority of the ROCOR reconciled, I could only remember that there was a split. We can agree that you're right on that one though.

The monarchist sympathies of Putin and his lackeys are just empty words. I'm willing to reconsider my position when someone actually does something to restore the monarchy.

If Assad's legitimacy lies in him being better than the current opposition, then how do you justify the Assad regime's existence before the Civil War? And it's not like Hafez al-Assad had no change to restore the monarchy. He did, and he didn't do it.

__________________
"Democratic governments are not suited to the publication of the thunderous revelations I am in the habit of making. The unpublished parts will appear later … when Europe will have restored its traditional monarchies." -Salvador Dalí, Diary of a Genius (1964)
azadi

Registered:
Posts: 632
Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by InVinoVeritas


Well, the Russian Orthodox Church should really think of it's priorities. After all, what's more important, existence or ideals? "Where are you going?" "To Rome to be crucified again." They should have condemned the Soviet Union. I can't say if a vast majority of the ROCOR reconciled, I could only remember that there was a split. We can agree that you're right on that one though.

The monarchist sympathies of Putin and his lackeys are just empty words. I'm willing to reconsider my position when someone actually does something to restore the monarchy.

If Assad's legitimacy lies in him being better than the current opposition, then how do you justify the Assad regime's existence before the Civil War? And it's not like Hafez al-Assad had no change to restore the monarchy. He did, and he didn't do it.

The church continuing to exist is necessary in order to pass Christianity on to the next generations. The Russian Orthodox clergy choosing martyrdom would have enabled the Soviet regime to raise an atheist generation. The Russian Orthodox clergy actually suffered brutal persecutions during the 1930's, in spite of Patriarch Sergey declaring loyalty to the Soviet regime in 1927. The ROCOR condemned the Soviet regime, but it has reconciled with the Moscow Patriarchate.
I have never claimed, that Putin is a monarchist.
Claiming, that you are tainted forever, because you once supported the Soviet regime, even if you reject Communism today, is wrong. Hun Sen, the current Prime Minister of Cambodia, was the leader of the pro-Vietnamese Communist regime of Cambodia after the overthrow of Pol Pot, but he is a monarchist today and he is a loyal supporter of King Norodom Sihamoni of Cambodia.
Attacking Hafez al-Assad, because he didn't restore the short-lived Hashemite monarchy of Syria, makes no sense. The Hashemite monarchy of Syria was abolished by France in 1920. Faisal, the Hashemite prince, who was elected King of Syria, later became the King of Iraq, and his branch of the Hashemite dynasty went extinct, when Faisal II, the last King of Iraq, was killed in 1958. Hafez al-Assad took power in Syria in 1970. When Hafez al-Assad took power in Syria, support for a Hashemite restoration in Syria was insignificant.


InVinoVeritas

Registered:
Posts: 27
Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by azadi

The church continuing to exist is necessary in order to pass Christianity on to the next generations. The Russian Orthodox clergy choosing martyrdom would have enabled the Soviet regime to raise an atheist generation. The Russian Orthodox clergy actually suffered brutal persecutions during the 1930's, in spite of Patriarch Sergey declaring loyalty to the Soviet regime in 1927. The ROCOR condemned the Soviet regime, but it has reconciled with the Moscow Patriarchate.
I have never claimed, that Putin is a monarchist.
Claiming, that you are tainted forever, because you once supported the Soviet regime, even if you reject Communism today, is wrong. Hun Sen, the current Prime Minister of Cambodia, was the leader of the pro-Vietnamese Communist regime of Cambodia after the overthrow of Pol Pot, but he is a monarchist today and he is a loyal supporter of King Norodom Sihamoni of Cambodia.
Attacking Hafez al-Assad, because he didn't restore the short-lived Hashemite monarchy of Syria, makes no sense. The Hashemite monarchy of Syria was abolished by France in 1920. Faisal, the Hashemite prince, who was elected King of Syria, later became the King of Iraq, and his branch of the Hashemite dynasty went extinct, when Faisal II, the last King of Iraq, was killed in 1958.Hafez al-Assad took power in Syria in 1970. When Hafez al-Assad took power in Syria, support for a Hashemite restoration in Syria was insignificant.
I would like Bashar al-Assad to become King of Syria. He is after all descended from Alawite nobility. King Zog of Albania was an Albanian nobleman.



I don't quite understand your argument. If the church here became corrupted in some way (as it has in other parts of Finland), I would not trust it with educating my children.

Putin's support for the USSR did not cease in 1991. He has called the the collapse of the Soviet Union "the greatest geopolitical catastrophe of the 20th century" and his regime continually rides on Soviet nostalgia. Furthermore, he himself continues to embody a Soviet mentality with all the associated simplification, crudeness and paranoia.

And I didn't mean Assad should've restored the Hashemite monarchy specifically. I would have been fine with any kind of a monarchy, even if he went all Bokassa and proclaimed himself the monarch.

__________________
"Democratic governments are not suited to the publication of the thunderous revelations I am in the habit of making. The unpublished parts will appear later … when Europe will have restored its traditional monarchies." -Salvador Dalí, Diary of a Genius (1964)
azadi

Registered:
Posts: 632
Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by InVinoVeritas


I don't quite understand your argument. If the church here became corrupted in some way (as it has in other parts of Finland), I would not trust it with educating my children.

Putin's support for the USSR did not cease in 1991. He has called the the collapse of the Soviet Union "the greatest geopolitical catastrophe of the 20th century" and his regime continually rides on Soviet nostalgia. Furthermore, he himself continues to embody a Soviet mentality with all the associated simplification, crudeness and paranoia.

And I didn't mean Assad should've restored the Hashemite monarchy specifically. I would have been fine with any kind of a monarchy, even if he went all Bokassa and proclaimed himself the monarch.

The Russian Orthodox Church has never abandoned genuine Christianity. It hasn't altered its dogmas. It believes in the Trinity, the resurrection of Jesus, justification through faith and works and the real presence of Jesus Christ in the Eucharist. It rejects filioque, papal supremacy, ordination of woman and gay marriage.
Why do you claim, that the church has been corrupted in other parts of Finland?
Putin is a Russian nationalist, who supports Orthodox Christianity. He is definitely not a Communist. He regrets the collapse of the USSR, because Russia lost control of the former Soviet republics, including Ukraine, not because he regrets the downfall of the Communist regime.
Assad is actually descended from Alawite nobility.
I hope, that Russia will become more democratic after the death of Putin. I won't rule the Russian monarchy being restored after the death of Putin, because some prominent supporters of Putin are monarchist. I hope Russia will remain conservative and nationalist, if Russia becomes a democracy. Japan is a democratic constitutional monarchy, which is ruled by a conservative and nationalist government. I would like Russia to emulate Japan. I despise Western globalist liberalism. 
InVinoVeritas

Registered:
Posts: 27
Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by azadi

The Russian Orthodox Church has never abandoned genuine Christianity. It hasn't altered its dogmas. It believes in the Trinity, the resurrection of Jesus, justification through faith and works and the real presence of Jesus Christ in the Eucharist. It rejects filioque, papal supremacy, ordination of woman and gay marriage.
Why do you claim, that the church has been corrupted in other parts of Finland?
Putin is a Russian nationalist, who supports Orthodox Christianity. He is definitely not a Communist. He regrets the collapse of the USSR, because Russia lost control of the former Soviet republics, including Ukraine, not because he regrets the downfall of the Communist regime.
Assad is actually descended from Alawite nobility.
I hope, that Russia will become more democratic after the death of Putin. I won't rule the Russian monarchy being restored after the death of Putin, because some prominent supporters of Putin are monarchist. I hope Russia will remain conservative and nationalist, if Russia becomes a democracy. Japan is a democratic constitutional monarchy, which is ruled by a conservative and nationalist government. I would like Russia to emulate Japan. I despise Western globalist liberalism. 


I read through some of my posts in this thread and again I feel the need to apologize for my previous lack of coherence. It would have saved us both some time if I hadn't began to argue while sick and tired. I hope I'm now in a better shape to argue my positions more clearly.

For me at least, being able to distinguish between good and evil, beauty and ugliness is important. The Russian Orthodox Church proved itself unable to perform this task, thus confusing the moral compass of the Russian people. For example the "Christian" neo-Stalinists can now just point to the ROC's support for the Soviet regime as a precedent to their own abhorrent positions.

In many parts of Finland, most prominently in big cities, the church is thoroughly corrupted by liberalism. If Jack Kerouac said he believed in "order, tenderness and piety", our church seems to believe in just the opposite. On moral questions, the church is also becoming increasingly relativistic. My parish is still mostly fine because it consists mainly of older people.

I'm not claiming that Putin is a communist. I'm claiming that he has refused to break with the legacy of the USSR and that he is still in fact infected by a Soviet mentality.

I have three hopes for post-Putin Russia. One, that the monarchy be restored, two, that the rights of the native peoples be respected and three, that the interference in other countries' business be ceased. Otherwise, I don't really care what they do.

__________________
"Democratic governments are not suited to the publication of the thunderous revelations I am in the habit of making. The unpublished parts will appear later … when Europe will have restored its traditional monarchies." -Salvador Dalí, Diary of a Genius (1964)
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.