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head_statue

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-17740638

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Royal Stewart DNA was confirmed in 15% of male participants with the Stewart surname. They are directly descended from the royal line of kings.


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2132029/Bonnie-Prince-Charlie-actually-ENGLISH-shock-DNA-study-reveals--Scottish-English-people-same.html

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The revelation came after a sample of spit from the Duke of Buccleuch, Britain's biggest private landowner and whose DNA is a perfect match for Charles Stewart of Ardshiel.
Stewart of Ardshiel - also of the Stewart family, fought at Culloden. 
The DNA is surprisingly common in Scotland - 15% of men with the surname Stewart have traces of it.
The discovery comes after a project set up by Dr Jim Wilson, a geneticist at Edinburgh University, and Alistair Moffat, rector of St Andrews University, which sampled DNA from 1,000 Scots over the past four months.
The project found traces of 100 different ethnic groups - including Berber and Tuareg tribesmen.
head_statue

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Admin please merge this thread with this one- http://royalcello.websitetoolbox.com/post/StewartStuart-maleline-descendants-5278718?highlight=stewart
Peter

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Very interesting. As I mention on that thread, there has always been considerable doubt as to whether the Duke of Monmouth was actually the biological son of Charles II. This is good evidence that he was. The reference to the Stewart lineage deriving from Cornwall and therefore being English is a little misleading. It is a matter of historical record that the Stewart lineage derives from Brittany. However, the Breton population in turn derived from immigration from Cornwall in the period immediately following the fall of the Western Empire. There was then no English tongue or nation, so the Stewarts cannot really be said to be that. British, in the original sense, would though be correct.
head_statue

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Originally Posted by Peter
Very interesting. As I mention on that thread, there has always been considerable doubt as to whether the Duke of Monmouth was actually the biological son of Charles II. This is good evidence that he was. The reference to the Stewart lineage deriving from Cornwall and therefore being English is a little misleading. It is a matter of historical record that the Stewart lineage derives from Brittany. However, the Breton population in turn derived from immigration from Cornwall in the period immediately following the fall of the Western Empire. There was then no English tongue or nation, so the Stewarts cannot really be said to be that. British, in the original sense, would though be correct.


The bretons were insular celts like the welsh, cornish, and the scottish, it wouldn't be suprising that they share the same DNA, what the article isn't telling us is whether english people who are descended from anglo saxons have different DNA markers, or whether most english people are descended from insular celts and acquired the anglo saxon language.
KYMonarchist

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Originally Posted by head_statue
The bretons were insular celts like the welsh, cornish, and the scottish, it wouldn't be suprising that they share the same DNA, what the article isn't telling us is whether english people who are descended from anglo saxons have different DNA markers, or whether most english people are descended from insular celts and acquired the anglo saxon language.


I think the truth is some combination of the two. There definitely is some distinct Anglo-Saxon DNA in the English people, nearly all of it male. (This makes sense when you think about it, since the Anglo-Saxons originally came to Britain as mercenaries, an occupation in which women were not normally then found.) Also, the proportion of Germanic DNA in England varies, with Kent in the southeast having the most and Cumbria in the northwest having the least. And pretty much everyone's maternal lineage is Celtic British, I believe. I think I've got all that right. Read it in books. 
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