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christopherdombrowski

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Reply with quote  #1 
Anyone know why the Bay Area resident Prince Andrew Romanov is not the true heir to the Russian throne? There's the typical possibility of him being the issue of a morganatic marriage, but the scant information I can find on his mother shows indications that she may have been from a royal background. The other possibility that came to mind is something to do with he himself marrying morganatically, but I haven't been able to find anything in Russian law yet suggesting that not only the issue of a morganatic marriage but even the participant he/herself is excluded by contracting in one.
Peter

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Reply with quote  #2 
His mother was of distinguished Italian and Russian noble ancestry, but there is no basis on which the marriage could be considered equal, and it was not. You are correct that the marriage of a dynast only affects inheritance from not by him, but Andrew Romanov is not a dynast.
christopherdombrowski

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Reply with quote  #3 
What exactly qualifies equal marriage to an imperial royal?
Peter

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Reply with quote  #4 
Article 36 of the 1797 succession law of Emperor Paul I states, being translated, 'Children born of a marriage between a member of the Imperial Family and a person not of corresponding birth, that is, not belonging to a royal or sovereign house, have no right of succession to the Throne.' So that is the definition, a member of a royal or sovereign house is automatically of equal birth and no one else is. Cases of doubt over a person's equal status would be resolved by the Emperor, nowadays Head of House, for example the marriage of Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaievna, eldest daughter of Nicholas I, to the Duke of Leuchtenberg was approved by her father as equal. This might be thought a somewhat debatable proposition, but tenuous as the Duke's claims to equal status might be he had some, and once the Emperor decided the question was settled. In the case of Andrew Romanov's mother, there was no possibility of claiming equal status and so nothing to decide.
Peter

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Reply with quote  #5 
As an addendum to the above, members of formerly sovereign houses, which includes mediatised families, have always been accepted as being of equal marriage status by all houses that require that. In a private discussion I had recently it was questioned whether a mediatised line was acceptable for a Romanov. My view, again, was that the universal acceptance of such lines elsewhere makes a prima facie case for their acceptability for Russian dynasts. There is certainly a basis for claiming equal status, and then the Head of House can make a binding decision, as for example Grand Duke Vladimir did for the brother of his own future wife, a member of a formerly sovereign house that he ruled to be equal. There will be a relevance to this if Grand Duke George marries unequally, as seems likely, as assuming willingness to convert to Orthodoxy the succession after him will go to the mediatised Leiningen line. Cue all sorts of arguments by non-dynastic Romanovs and their supporters over the status of the Leiningens when, really, it is not at all in question and if it were the Beauharnais and Bagration precedents would have settled it.
christopherdombrowski

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Reply with quote  #6 

I'm confused. Wikipedia claims that his mother was the daughter of a Duke and a Princess...

From the page for his father (Prince Andrei Alexandrovich):

"It was during this turbulent period that Prince Andrei began a relationship with Elisabetta Ruffo-Sasso (1886–1940) [dei duchi di Sasso-Ruffo dei principi di Sant' Antimo], a young widow. They had met in St Peterburg in 1916. She was a daughter of Fabrizio Ruffo, Duke of Sasso-Ruffo and Princess Natalia Alexandrovna Mescherskaya (herself a descendant of a famous family of the Stroganovs)."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_Andrei_Alexandrovich_of_Russia

 

Are you saying this information is incorrect? Or is that somehow still an unequal marriage?

Peter

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Reply with quote  #7 
Both duke and princess can be royal or noble titles. In this case, both noble, and neither her father's nor her mother's family had any pretensions to being sovereign.
christopherdombrowski

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Reply with quote  #8 
Got it. Thanks Peter.
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