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azadi

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Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sir_Roman_D

I also answer in order:

1. Vsevolod Chaplin said a lot. Based on one of his statements can not draw conclusions about his preferences. I was one of the founders of the monarchist movement in Russia in 1988. I know all the monarchical figures of that time and later period. There was no Archpriest Chaplin among us. His "monarchism" is ordinary populism;

2. I am not a patriot of the Russian Federation. For me, this state is a continuation of the USSR, it has nothing to do with our murdered Empire. The same yesterday's communists and KGB officers rule here. The annexation of Crimea to the Russian Federation has nothing to do with us: what difference does the Crimea belong to: nationalist Ukraine or Stalinists from the Kremlin? Their joys are not my joys.

3. You are misinformed, my dear sir. The elimination of illiteracy was initiated by the Imperial Government. The chief procurator of the Holy Synod, Konstantin Pobedonostsev, was the organizer of hundreds of thousands of elementary schools at each church (this was called Ts. P. Sh. — Parish schools). Female discrimination in the Russian Empire was no more than in other states of that time: the right to vote was based on the “one family - one vote in the election” scheme, women had no training bans and no occupational bans.

Lev Kazem-Bek was a spy for the OGPU-NKVD. He is hated by our White immigrants. His party of the Young Russians is nothing more than an “Orthodox Komsomol”, this is disgusting, disgusting. After 1945, Lev Kazem-Bek moved to the USSR and worked in the red Stalinist Moscow Patriarchate. The absolute majority of Russian monarchists treat this man as a provocateur and a scoundrel. Our Grand Prince Vladimir Kirillovich, who was the Head of the Dynasty from 1938 to 1992, was under the influence of this man in his youth, but later ceased all relations with him. For Russian monarchists, any sympathy for the Young Russian party is a very bad recommendation.

4. The Russian Orthodox Church Abroad in 2007 had a great schism. Some of its parts were united with the Moscow Patriarchate, but not all. Those who joined the Moscow Patriarchate are traitors who sold the birthright for lentils. In Europe, in the USA, in Chile and Argentina, in Paraguay, there remained the dioceses of the Orthodox Church Outside of Russia, which did not wish to unite with the Stalinist "church." Kirill Gundyaev - certainly a "conservative" - but a Soviet conservative, not Russian. I am not an Orthodox Christian, though there are many Orthodox priests, monks and laity among my friends; I belong to the Universal Roman Catholic Church.

5. Believe me: same-sex marriage, gay parades and other inventions of the “new left” are not the main danger for Russia. Nobody cares about it here. Local gays themselves do not want to advertise their relationship. But even gay people are the same people, and their rights must be protected by law. I am sure that if a gay parade is allowed in Russia, then no more than a hundred gays will come to him - and another two or two spectators who will laugh and smile. No gay parades here will break traditional Christian values. The main danger for Russia is not this. I have already spoken about corruption: it is terrible, terrible. My dear friend, you write that Vladimir Putin does not allow refugees from Africa and from the countries of the Arab world into Russia. It's right. But Vladimir Putin let Chinese citizens and Chinese business into Russia. This is scary. Here, in Siberia, the taiga is barbarously cut down; wood, millions of cubic meters of wood are sent to China every day. Wood is sold for nothing. Today, the Chinese Communist Republic is the main supplier of wood to America and to Europe. But in the Chinese Communist Republic, deforestation is FORBIDDEN. My dear friend, please guess the riddle: WHERE does China sell the wood it sells to other countries? ... Chinese citizens buy housing here, buy land here, buy infrastructure; local residents are protesting, but there are no results. I live in Siberia, and I see it with my own eyes. This is scary, scary.

6. In Russia there is no opposition movement that would be massive and influential. Neither conservative nor liberal, not even leftist. No And this is the result of twenty years of the rule of the “conservative” Vladimir Putin. His government does not need any opposition, and she (the opposition) is successfully suppressed. In 2011, something that had never happened before happened: after the results of the parliamentary elections were falsified, Russian liberals and Russian conservatives united. From that time on, a very interesting process began: quite a few liberal figures began to drift to the right. Now all the opposition in Russia exists semi-legally, each protest is dispersed by the police. Boris Nemtsov was very close to the Russian conservatives, and it would be good if he had not been killed and would have become the President of Russia. This would enable the Russian liberal-conservative opposition to unite and get a majority. Russian conservatives and liberals are moving towards each other, and together we could turn Russia into a civilized European state and stop left fundamentalists, red Nazis and Stalinists. But for now you can only dream about it.


1. Despite not being loyal towards the Russian Federation, you can still support the reunification of Crimea with Russia. If the Putin government is overthrown and replaced with a government more to your liking, then Crimea will be part of this improved Russia. If Crimea had remained part of Ukraine, it would have been lost to the new improved Russia. During WW1, French monarchists supported the French Republic regaining Alsace-Lorraine. Regimes come and go, but the nation remains. 

2. You are right about corruption being a huge problem in Russia, and I agree, that expansion of Chinese influence and Chinese immigration in Siberia is very worrying. It's sad, that Russia lacks rule of law. Concerning gay rights, I oppose persecution of homosexuals, but I oppose gay marriage and gay adoption too.

3. You are right about eradication of illiteracy in Russia and women obtaining equal rights in Russia not being solely due to the Soviet regime. The Tsarist government introduced universal schooling in 1908, and women were allowed to enroll at universities in Russia in 1914.

4. I still disagree with you about the Putin government being Communist. Despite the Soviet regime allowing the Russian Orthodox Church to exist after 1941, state atheism remained the official policy of the USSR until 1988. Putin rejects state atheism. Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, the greatest anti-Soviet dissident, supported Putin.

5. I'm not opposed to criticism of the Putin government. But I'm opposed to the widespread Russophobia in Western countries. Anybody, who wants their country to establish improved relations with Russia, is called a traitor. That's unacceptable.

6. I don't want Russia to become like Western Europe, which is ruled by liberal globalists. I would rather like Russia becoming like Japan, which is a democratic constitutional monarchy with rule of law, which is ruled by conservative nationalists.
sir_Roman_D

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Reply with quote  #17 

Dear Sir, we will again discuss each item. Do you mind? Then - you are welcome:

1. Crimea. I am a supporter of legitimism. In all. Let's see what happened in the Crimea. I don’t even talk about whether this “referendum” was initiated by Moscow (I think it was, but I don’t have direct evidence, so I’m not talking). I'm talking about something else: the residents of the Crimea suddenly voted for “joining Russia” - but before that they did NOT VOTE for secession from Ukraine. It is the same as “going outside without leaving home”: the most important legal formality was not observed. Do you understand what I am talking about? DO NOT REMEMBER ON THE STREET, WITHOUT LEAVING THE HOUSE - and in the same way DO NOT JOIN RUSSIA, WITHOUT LEAVING THE COMPOSITION OF UKRAINE. This is a very important legal aspect! I am not opposed to the Crimea being part of Russia, but for this, all legal formalities must be observed. Law - above all! If the leaders of Russia said: “We cannot accept the Crimea peninsula into the state’s structure until the local residents have held a referendum for separation from Ukraine,” then everything would be different. And the fact how it was done in 2014 caused outrage around the world - a fair outrage. Personally, all this reminds me of the "accession" of Austria to the Third German Empire, and I do not like it. I want Russia to comply with international rules and laws, and not act "by the law of the strong."

2. I have nothing against gays, while gays do not stick to me on the street. And I am convinced that their rights should be protected by law, as are the rights of any citizen.

3. Long before the introduction of universal primary education, in the Russian Empire there were private schools in which peasant children were taught - this process began as early as the 1860s - 1870s. Another thing is that the peasants themselves considered education as a “waste of time" and took the children out of school. However, this situation was in those years not only in the Russian Empire. The same applies to women's emancipation: in the Russian Empire there existed the famous Bestuzhev Higher Courses for young ladies, there were the Institutes of Noble Ladies, in which young ladies received education. For example, in my city there was the Ladies' Institute of Emperor Nicholas I, but since there were very few nobles here, girls from the merchant class and even the daughters of the native (Buryat and Yakut) leaders were admitted to this institute. This institute has operated in Siberia since 1841.

4. Putin rejects state atheism, but Putin has put the Russian Orthodox Church in the service of himself. The Moscow Patriarchate has become an “ideological department” under Putin’s office. The priests of the Moscow Patriarchate today are called "commissars in cassocks." In the Moscow Patriarchate today there is a lot of politics, a lot of ideology, but almost no word of God, no Christ, no gospel. At the same time, the principle of freedom of conscience is violated: thus, the Jehovah's Witnesses Church is recognized in the Russian Federation as an “extremist community” and is prohibited. Many members of the Jehovah's Witnesses Church have either fled the country or are in prison. What is better than the policy of state atheism, which was carried out by the Communists?

5. I am against Russophobia, and I am against any “-phobia”. I am against anti-Semitism, against racism, against religious and racial hatred. But modern Russophobia in America and Europe is a direct consequence of Mr. Putin’s aggressive policies. In 2014, journalist Dmitry Kiselev said on the main state (!) Television channel: “Today Russia is the only state in the world that can turn the United States into radioactive ash.” What do you think, dear sir, will Russophobia disappear after such statements on state (!) Russian television? ...

6. I do not want Russia to become like Japan. I want Russia to become similar to Russia - to that Russia, which was a full member of the European Family of Nations until 1917. I want the head of Russia to be the king or emperor from the legitimate German dynasty Romanov-Schlesving-Holstein-Gottorp, or Habsburg, or another. That this monarch guarantees the inviolability of our rights, which are enshrined in the Constitution. So that we freely elect Parliament, and so that no one steals our votes or falsifies the elections. To any private property was inviolable, even the smallest. To taxes were low, and the officials did not steal. To our taxes remained in the provinces, and did not go to Moscow. So that the police would be polite, so that the police would protect us from criminals, and not fabricate fictitious “cases” against us. That in this country there were no political prisoners, so that no one was imprisoned for his religious convictions. So that maniacs do not threaten the whole world with a nuclear “baton”. So that, coming to Europe and America, I could be proud of Russia (and now I’m the brazen of Russia).

P.S. Over the 20 years of Mr. Putin’s rule, the population of the Russian Federation is constantly decreasing. This happens not only because of the low birth rate and not only because of the high mortality rate. Every year, from the Russian Federation emigrates to Europe, the USA, Canada, Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Brazil, Australia and New Zealand from 40,000 to 60,000 people (this is the population of one Russian provincial city). First of all, people who have a good education leave. Entrepreneurs are leaving, against which the police fabricated criminal cases. Journalists and writers, public figures are leaving, young people are leaving. Those who are able to think independently, who are tired of the neo-Soviet “velvet dictatorship” are leaving. Please think about it, my dear sir.


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sir_Roman_D

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And, by the way, dear sir, where did you read that Alexander Solzhenitsyn supported Vladimir Putin? Alexander Solzhenitsyn lived out his last years in Russia, when Putin gained power. Being a deep old man, a sick man, Alexander Solzhenitsyn had already retired from social activities. He had a small TV program, but by the early 2000s no one paid any attention to him and his opinion in Russia: Solzhenitsyn had been forgotten. Vladimir Putin in those years was still cautious and did not show his character. And the meetings of Solzhenitsyn and Putin are nothing more than a formality: this is a meeting not of like-minded people, but a meeting of the head of state and Nobel Prize winner.

We are all sure: looking at what Putin turned the Russian Federation into, Alexander Solzhenitsyn turns over in his grave. We are sure: if Solzhenitsyn were alive today, he would either end up in a concentration camp again, or go to Vermont, USA again. But he would never accept the policy that exists in Russia today, and would never support this neo-Stalinist regime.


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azadi

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Reply with quote  #19 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sir_Roman_D

Dear Sir, we will again discuss each item. Do you mind? Then - you are welcome:

1. Crimea. I am a supporter of legitimism. In all. Let's see what happened in the Crimea. I don’t even talk about whether this “referendum” was initiated by Moscow (I think it was, but I don’t have direct evidence, so I’m not talking). I'm talking about something else: the residents of the Crimea suddenly voted for “joining Russia” - but before that they did NOT VOTE for secession from Ukraine. It is the same as “going outside without leaving home”: the most important legal formality was not observed. Do you understand what I am talking about? DO NOT REMEMBER ON THE STREET, WITHOUT LEAVING THE HOUSE - and in the same way DO NOT JOIN RUSSIA, WITHOUT LEAVING THE COMPOSITION OF UKRAINE. This is a very important legal aspect! I am not opposed to the Crimea being part of Russia, but for this, all legal formalities must be observed. Law - above all! If the leaders of Russia said: “We cannot accept the Crimea peninsula into the state’s structure until the local residents have held a referendum for separation from Ukraine,” then everything would be different. And the fact how it was done in 2014 caused outrage around the world - a fair outrage. Personally, all this reminds me of the "accession" of Austria to the Third German Empire, and I do not like it. I want Russia to comply with international rules and laws, and not act "by the law of the strong."

2. I have nothing against gays, while gays do not stick to me on the street. And I am convinced that their rights should be protected by law, as are the rights of any citizen.

3. Long before the introduction of universal primary education, in the Russian Empire there were private schools in which peasant children were taught - this process began as early as the 1860s - 1870s. Another thing is that the peasants themselves considered education as a “waste of time" and took the children out of school. However, this situation was in those years not only in the Russian Empire. The same applies to women's emancipation: in the Russian Empire there existed the famous Bestuzhev Higher Courses for young ladies, there were the Institutes of Noble Ladies, in which young ladies received education. For example, in my city there was the Ladies' Institute of Emperor Nicholas I, but since there were very few nobles here, girls from the merchant class and even the daughters of the native (Buryat and Yakut) leaders were admitted to this institute. This institute has operated in Siberia since 1841.

4. Putin rejects state atheism, but Putin has put the Russian Orthodox Church in the service of himself. The Moscow Patriarchate has become an “ideological department” under Putin’s office. The priests of the Moscow Patriarchate today are called "commissars in cassocks." In the Moscow Patriarchate today there is a lot of politics, a lot of ideology, but almost no word of God, no Christ, no gospel. At the same time, the principle of freedom of conscience is violated: thus, the Jehovah's Witnesses Church is recognized in the Russian Federation as an “extremist community” and is prohibited. Many members of the Jehovah's Witnesses Church have either fled the country or are in prison. What is better than the policy of state atheism, which was carried out by the Communists?

5. I am against Russophobia, and I am against any “-phobia”. I am against anti-Semitism, against racism, against religious and racial hatred. But modern Russophobia in America and Europe is a direct consequence of Mr. Putin’s aggressive policies. In 2014, journalist Dmitry Kiselev said on the main state (!) Television channel: “Today Russia is the only state in the world that can turn the United States into radioactive ash.” What do you think, dear sir, will Russophobia disappear after such statements on state (!) Russian television? ...

6. I do not want Russia to become like Japan. I want Russia to become similar to Russia - to that Russia, which was a full member of the European Family of Nations until 1917. I want the head of Russia to be the king or emperor from the legitimate German dynasty Romanov-Schlesving-Holstein-Gottorp, or Habsburg, or another. That this monarch guarantees the inviolability of our rights, which are enshrined in the Constitution. So that we freely elect Parliament, and so that no one steals our votes or falsifies the elections. To any private property was inviolable, even the smallest. To taxes were low, and the officials did not steal. To our taxes remained in the provinces, and did not go to Moscow. So that the police would be polite, so that the police would protect us from criminals, and not fabricate fictitious “cases” against us. That in this country there were no political prisoners, so that no one was imprisoned for his religious convictions. So that maniacs do not threaten the whole world with a nuclear “baton”. So that, coming to Europe and America, I could be proud of Russia (and now I’m the brazen of Russia).

P.S. Over the 20 years of Mr. Putin’s rule, the population of the Russian Federation is constantly decreasing. This happens not only because of the low birth rate and not only because of the high mortality rate. Every year, from the Russian Federation emigrates to Europe, the USA, Canada, Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Brazil, Australia and New Zealand from 40,000 to 60,000 people (this is the population of one Russian provincial city). First of all, people who have a good education leave. Entrepreneurs are leaving, against which the police fabricated criminal cases. Journalists and writers, public figures are leaving, young people are leaving. Those who are able to think independently, who are tired of the neo-Soviet “velvet dictatorship” are leaving. Please think about it, my dear sir.


1. Do you want Crimea to remain part of Russia, despite the referendum not being properly conducted according to you?
I'm a strong supporter of the right of national self-determination. If international law prevents secession, then international law is wrong. I'm a strong supporter of Kurdish independence from Iraq, and I will support Kurdish independence from Iraq regardless of whether the Western powers like it or not. Russia is the only great power, which accepts Kurdish independence from Iraq.

2. I agree, that Western countries criticizing the Putin government is legitimate. When I speak about Russophobia in USA and Western Europe, I speak about Trump and other American and European politicians being considered traitors, when they want to improve relations with Russia.

3. I don't want Russia to become like Japan, because Russian culture is very different from Japanese culture, but I would like Russia to emulate the political system of Japan, because Japan is a constitutional monarchy with a freely elected parliament and rule of law, while being ruled by conservative nationalists. I admire the Japanese Imperial Family and Shinzo Abe. I don't want Russia to become ruled by liberal globalists like Germany and France are.  


sir_Roman_D

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For me, much closer is the British model of parliamentary monarchy. Nevertheless, the Russian political model of the times of the Empire was formed under the influence of Great Britain and the Germanic Kingdoms and Principles, and we must return to exactly this European model.

I no longer want to discuss the situation with the Crimea, excuse me, dear sir. You consider yourself a monarchist, and immediately talk about the right of nations to self-determination. It seems to me that these concepts are somewhat contradictory: for a monarchist, the Triumph of the Law should have the highest and absolute value. In addition, I will allow myself to repeat: since the modern Russian Federation is not the legal successor of the Russian Empire, but is the legal successor of the USSR, I look at the annexation of the Crimea as a continuation of the Soviet expansionist policy. And the victories and territorial acquisitions of the heirs of the USSR does not cause me any enthusiasm. Modern Ukraine, which is pursuing a policy of de-communization and destroying the totalitarian monuments of the Soviet period, is much nicer to me.

All this ostentatious "monarchism" of some Russian political and religious leaders of the Russian Federation is nothing more than populism and vulgar pseudo-patriotism. The purpose of all this is to deceive the trust of honest and simple-minded people both inside Russia and in the rest of the world, and to attract them to their side. I hate to watch it. I hate to see how Mrs. Poklonskaya discredits with her behavior the idea of the Russian Monarchy. I hate to see how some illiterate, angry and aggressive actors call themselves "Russian monarchists." I am disgusted by the anti-European and anti-American statements of the local "patriots". I think you will agree with me, dear sir. Is not it?

"Russophobia"? ... But do not forget that it was RUSSIAN that overthrew the Monarchy, it was RUSSIAN that killed and the aristocracy and knights were expelled from Russia, it was RUSSIAN who blew up Christian cathedrals and burned icons on fires. And then, waving a red flag, they occupied half of Europe for 50 years and threatened the world with a nuclear war. It was from Moscow that all sorts of red terrorists were financed - from Sukhbaatar and Cholboysan in Mongolia, to Castro and Che Guevara in Cuba. It was the Russian Communists who financed the Spanish Republicans and fought against the monarchists of General Franco in Spain. It was Moscow that was behind the overthrow of the Emperor of Manchuria and Bogd Khan of Mongolia, the King of Bulgaria and the King of Romania, the King of Yugoslavia and the King of Albania, the Emperor of Ethiopia, the Emperor of Vietnam, the King of Laos and the King of Cambodia. Is it not known to you, dear sir?

Over the past hundred years, it was the Russian Communists who did everything possible, and even the impossible, so that in the rest of the world there was "Russophobia." Do you agree with me, dear sir?

And now, please see this link, my dear friend. This is the “Walk of Russian Glory” in St. Petersburg, in the former capital of the Empire. This alley of monuments was created in 2008, when Russia was led by Mr. Putin. From now on, the killer and terrorist Ernesto Guevara is a “Russian national hero”: https://mr-7.ru/articles/190651/


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DavidV

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Reply with quote  #21 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sir_Roman_D

I also answer in order:

1. Vsevolod Chaplin said a lot. Based on one of his statements can not draw conclusions about his preferences. I was one of the founders of the monarchist movement in Russia in 1988. I know all the monarchical figures of that time and later period. There was no Archpriest Chaplin among us. His "monarchism" is ordinary populism;

2. I am not a patriot of the Russian Federation. For me, this state is a continuation of the USSR, it has nothing to do with our murdered Empire. The same yesterday's communists and KGB officers rule here. The annexation of Crimea to the Russian Federation has nothing to do with us: what difference does the Crimea belong to: nationalist Ukraine or Stalinists from the Kremlin? Their joys are not my joys.

3. You are misinformed, my dear sir. The elimination of illiteracy was initiated by the Imperial Government. The chief procurator of the Holy Synod, Konstantin Pobedonostsev, was the organizer of hundreds of thousands of elementary schools at each church (this was called Ts. P. Sh. — Parish schools). Female discrimination in the Russian Empire was no more than in other states of that time: the right to vote was based on the “one family - one vote in the election” scheme, women had no training bans and no occupational bans.

Lev Kazem-Bek was a spy for the OGPU-NKVD. He is hated by our White immigrants. His party of the Young Russians is nothing more than an “Orthodox Komsomol”, this is disgusting, disgusting. After 1945, Lev Kazem-Bek moved to the USSR and worked in the red Stalinist Moscow Patriarchate. The absolute majority of Russian monarchists treat this man as a provocateur and a scoundrel. Our Grand Prince Vladimir Kirillovich, who was the Head of the Dynasty from 1938 to 1992, was under the influence of this man in his youth, but later ceased all relations with him. For Russian monarchists, any sympathy for the Young Russian party is a very bad recommendation.

4. The Russian Orthodox Church Abroad in 2007 had a great schism. Some of its parts were united with the Moscow Patriarchate, but not all. Those who joined the Moscow Patriarchate are traitors who sold the birthright for lentils. In Europe, in the USA, in Chile and Argentina, in Paraguay, there remained the dioceses of the Orthodox Church Outside of Russia, which did not wish to unite with the Stalinist "church." Kirill Gundyaev - certainly a "conservative" - but a Soviet conservative, not Russian. I am not an Orthodox Christian, though there are many Orthodox priests, monks and laity among my friends; I belong to the Universal Roman Catholic Church.

5. Believe me: same-sex marriage, gay parades and other inventions of the “new left” are not the main danger for Russia. Nobody cares about it here. Local gays themselves do not want to advertise their relationship. But even gay people are the same people, and their rights must be protected by law. I am sure that if a gay parade is allowed in Russia, then no more than a hundred gays will come to him - and another two or two spectators who will laugh and smile. No gay parades here will break traditional Christian values. The main danger for Russia is not this. I have already spoken about corruption: it is terrible, terrible. My dear friend, you write that Vladimir Putin does not allow refugees from Africa and from the countries of the Arab world into Russia. It's right. But Vladimir Putin let Chinese citizens and Chinese business into Russia. This is scary. Here, in Siberia, the taiga is barbarously cut down; wood, millions of cubic meters of wood are sent to China every day. Wood is sold for nothing. Today, the Chinese Communist Republic is the main supplier of wood to America and to Europe. But in the Chinese Communist Republic, deforestation is FORBIDDEN. My dear friend, please guess the riddle: WHERE does China sell the wood it sells to other countries? ... Chinese citizens buy housing here, buy land here, buy infrastructure; local residents are protesting, but there are no results. I live in Siberia, and I see it with my own eyes. This is scary, scary.

6. In Russia there is no opposition movement that would be massive and influential. Neither conservative nor liberal, not even leftist. No And this is the result of twenty years of the rule of the “conservative” Vladimir Putin. His government does not need any opposition, and she (the opposition) is successfully suppressed. In 2011, something that had never happened before happened: after the results of the parliamentary elections were falsified, Russian liberals and Russian conservatives united. From that time on, a very interesting process began: quite a few liberal figures began to drift to the right. Now all the opposition in Russia exists semi-legally, each protest is dispersed by the police. Boris Nemtsov was very close to the Russian conservatives, and it would be good if he had not been killed and would have become the President of Russia. This would enable the Russian liberal-conservative opposition to unite and get a majority. Russian conservatives and liberals are moving towards each other, and together we could turn Russia into a civilized European state and stop left fundamentalists, red Nazis and Stalinists. But for now you can only dream about it.



Yes. ROCOR has produced a number of splits, which are known as ROCOR(V) and ROCOR(A) after Vitaly and Agafangel respectively.

It should be worth noting that the Soviet Union, PRC and Cuba were/are not liberal on moral and cultural matters, but they were happy to support social movements in the West to undermine Western Civilisation. The Islamist regimes are doing this now.

azadi

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Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidV


Yes. ROCOR has produced a number of splits, which are known as ROCOR(V) and ROCOR(A) after Vitaly and Agafangel respectively.

It should be worth noting that the Soviet Union, PRC and Cuba were/are not liberal on moral and cultural matters, but they were happy to support social movements in the West to undermine Western Civilisation. The Islamist regimes are doing this now.


The Cuban government currently supports gay rights. Homosexuality was decriminalized in Cuba in 1979, and the Cuban government proposed including gay marriage in the new constitution of Cuba last year. In addition, the Communist Party of China maintains state atheism.

Putin supports right-wing nationalists in Western European countries like Matteo Salvini, and he supported Trump in the 2016 presidential election. In Kurdistan, Putin supports KRG, which is conservative and nationalist and where the Kurdish aristocracy has significant influence, while USA supports PYD, the Syrian branch of the Maoist PKK. I support KRG and I admire Trump, Salvini and Viktor Orban. PUTIN WILL LEAD THE GLOBAL COUNTERREVOLUTION AGAINST LIBERAL GLOBALISM!
azadi

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Reply with quote  #23 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sir_Roman_D

For me, much closer is the British model of parliamentary monarchy. Nevertheless, the Russian political model of the times of the Empire was formed under the influence of Great Britain and the Germanic Kingdoms and Principles, and we must return to exactly this European model.

I no longer want to discuss the situation with the Crimea, excuse me, dear sir. You consider yourself a monarchist, and immediately talk about the right of nations to self-determination. It seems to me that these concepts are somewhat contradictory: for a monarchist, the Triumph of the Law should have the highest and absolute value. In addition, I will allow myself to repeat: since the modern Russian Federation is not the legal successor of the Russian Empire, but is the legal successor of the USSR, I look at the annexation of the Crimea as a continuation of the Soviet expansionist policy. And the victories and territorial acquisitions of the heirs of the USSR does not cause me any enthusiasm. Modern Ukraine, which is pursuing a policy of de-communization and destroying the totalitarian monuments of the Soviet period, is much nicer to me.

All this ostentatious "monarchism" of some Russian political and religious leaders of the Russian Federation is nothing more than populism and vulgar pseudo-patriotism. The purpose of all this is to deceive the trust of honest and simple-minded people both inside Russia and in the rest of the world, and to attract them to their side. I hate to watch it. I hate to see how Mrs. Poklonskaya discredits with her behavior the idea of the Russian Monarchy. I hate to see how some illiterate, angry and aggressive actors call themselves "Russian monarchists." I am disgusted by the anti-European and anti-American statements of the local "patriots". I think you will agree with me, dear sir. Is not it?

"Russophobia"? ... But do not forget that it was RUSSIAN that overthrew the Monarchy, it was RUSSIAN that killed and the aristocracy and knights were expelled from Russia, it was RUSSIAN who blew up Christian cathedrals and burned icons on fires. And then, waving a red flag, they occupied half of Europe for 50 years and threatened the world with a nuclear war. It was from Moscow that all sorts of red terrorists were financed - from Sukhbaatar and Cholboysan in Mongolia, to Castro and Che Guevara in Cuba. It was the Russian Communists who financed the Spanish Republicans and fought against the monarchists of General Franco in Spain. It was Moscow that was behind the overthrow of the Emperor of Manchuria and Bogd Khan of Mongolia, the King of Bulgaria and the King of Romania, the King of Yugoslavia and the King of Albania, the Emperor of Ethiopia, the Emperor of Vietnam, the King of Laos and the King of Cambodia. Is it not known to you, dear sir?

Over the past hundred years, it was the Russian Communists who did everything possible, and even the impossible, so that in the rest of the world there was "Russophobia." Do you agree with me, dear sir?

And now, please see this link, my dear friend. This is the “Walk of Russian Glory” in St. Petersburg, in the former capital of the Empire. This alley of monuments was created in 2008, when Russia was led by Mr. Putin. From now on, the killer and terrorist Ernesto Guevara is a “Russian national hero”: https://mr-7.ru/articles/190651/


I agree, that a democratic constitutional Russian monarchy with free elections and rule of law is preferable to the Putin government, but the Russian Federation is preferable to the USSR, because it has abandoned state atheism, supports the Russian Orthodox Church, allows private enterprise,has restored the white-blue-red horizontal tricolor, which was the flag of Tsarist Russia, and allows exiled Romanovs and Russian nobles to return to Russia. I dislike the Federal Republic of Germany, but I consider it preferable to Nazi Germany and the Communist regime of East Germany. I prefer the Hohenzollern Empire and even the Weimar Republic, whose president (Hindenburg) was a conservative nationalist nobleman, to the Federal Republic of Germany, which rejects nationalism and supports mass immigration to Germany.

Western Europe is dominated by liberal globalists, who support gay marriage, Arab and African mass immigration and the establishment of a European superstate. I don't want Russia to emulate the failed liberal globalist experiments of Western Europe. That's why I mentioned Japan as a model for Russia.


You claim, that monarchism and the right of national self-determination is contradictory. I disagree, because I consider monarchism and nationalism to be compatible. Monarchies embody the traditions and the heritage of the nation. The nation is united by a shared national identity, and the state borders ought to be based on the national identity of the majority of the local population. States, which aren't unified by a shared national identity, are unstable.
I strongly support Kurdish independence from Iraq, and I would like a Romanov being elected Shah of independent Kurdistan, because of the historical ties between Kurdistan and Russia. 
DavidV

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And Russia does it again with whitewashing history:
https://twitter.com/EmbassyofRussia/status/1173876109034819585
azadi

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Reply with quote  #25 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidV
And Russia does it again with whitewashing history:
https://twitter.com/EmbassyofRussia/status/1173876109034819585

Your anti-Russian propaganda is tiresome. I agree, that Stalinist nostalgia in Russia is wrong, but Russia is far from the only country, which is whitewashing history. Turkey continues to deny the Armenian Genocide, Japan continues to deny or minimize its war crimes during the Pacific War, a lot of Britons still defend the legacy of British colonialism in India, Africa and the Middle East, and a lot of Frenchmen still defend the legacy of French colonialism in Algeria. Germany's contrition for the crimes of the Nazi regime is very unusual. 
What matters is, that the Putin government isn't Communist. Putin supports the Russian Orthodox Church, rejects state atheism, allows private enterprise to exist, use the Tsarist tricolor rather than the flag of the USSR and allows the Romanovs to live in Russia, if they want to. I don't understand, why you accuse governments, which you dislike, of being Communist. You have repeatedly accused the ANC of being Communist on this forum in spite of the facts, that ANC supports the native monarchies of South Africa, including the Zulu monarchy, and allows free and fair elections in South Africa. 
DavidV

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The Center for Security Policy has a broadcast which is well worth a listen:
https://www.centerforsecuritypolicy.org/2019/10/11/judgement-in-moscow-soviet-crimes-and-western-complicity/
azadi

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Reply with quote  #27 
Vsevolod Chaplin wants Putin to be crowned Tsar of Russia.
azadi

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Reply with quote  #28 
An interesting proposal to end Cold War II:
https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/russia-fsu/2019-10-15/let-russia-be-russia

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