Monarchy Forum
Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 1 of 2      1   2   Next
DavidV

Registered:
Posts: 4,990
Reply with quote  #1 
Black Ribbon day celebrates the victims of totalitarian ideologies like Communism and Nazism. However, the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs paints a one-sided view:

https://twitter.com/mfa_russia/status/900398021623656450
(Note the negative replies)

And this:
https://twitter.com/mfa_russia/status/901049550667993088

Subsequently two Twitter users, one of which is Daniel Hannan, set the record straight:
https://twitter.com/paleomexicano/status/900447233782431744
https://twitter.com/DanielJHannan/status/900474829073248256

Liberals have been hysterical about Russia either for no reason or all the wrong reasons. Conservatives and nationalists like myself have long been critical of modern Russia for the right reasons, and what we've seen on Twitter from Russia's Ministry of Foreign Affairs proves it. It's good to see Daniel Hannan and Jaak Madison call them out on this. It's long overdue.

People have been blinded as to the true nature of the state in Russia that never had any kind of reform or counterrevolution since the Soviet Union fell. Vladimir Putin personifies this in its highest form as a former KGB man. Russia continues the Soviet foreign policy of supporting the world's most odious and hateful regimes.

Above all else, there is the glorification of Soviet history that is offensive almost without equal. Under Gorbachev and Yeltsin, this was played down to some extent. But Putin, who clearly regrets the fall of the Soviet Union, has ramped up the propaganda war as can be seen every May 9. If you ever watched The Soviet Story you will know the whole story. Poland, the Baltic, Ukraine, the Caucasus, the mass rapes and deportations... I can say this a billion times over just to get the message into people's heads.

The denial of Communist crimes is like the denial of Nazi crimes, perpetuated by people convinced their systems could do no wrong. We know, for instance, that Turkey denies the Armenian Genocide and we forcefully condemn this. We forcefully condemn those who deny the Holocaust. But what Russia does is at least as bad and in some ways WORSE. They know what happened, and they are proud of it. Every decent person must see this as utterly vile and morally repugnant.

Please, don't you dare call me "Russophobic" for telling the truth. There are also a good many Russians, and Russian emigre descendants, who are far more aware of the facts than non-Russians are about both this chapter of history and the true nature of the Putin state. The true nature of that state is revealed by what it revels in. Do not be deceived.

For more:


DavidV

Registered:
Posts: 4,990
Reply with quote  #2 
In related news, Estonia criticises the government of Greece for refusing to acknowledge Communist crimes:

http://greece.greekreporter.com/2017/08/21/greek-govt-refuses-to-participate-in-conference-condemning-communist-crimes/
DavidV

Registered:
Posts: 4,990
Reply with quote  #3 
And again, this time Russia's denial of the Ukrainian famine:
https://twitter.com/Ukraine/status/933715095007432704
DavidV

Registered:
Posts: 4,990
Reply with quote  #4 
We're not making this up: Stalin is being venerated in Russia today in the most blasphemous way

royalcello

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 6,813
Reply with quote  #5 
Disgusting.
DavidV

Registered:
Posts: 4,990
Reply with quote  #6 
Putin once more never ceases to amaze, praising Communism and calling Lenin a "saint". So much for being some "traditionalist" bulwark:

https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/904717/Putin-communism-christianity-Russia-Lenin-saint-bolshevik-revolution-Stalin-atheism-news
sir_Roman_D

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 102
Reply with quote  #7 

In 1991, and then in 1993, Yeltsin did not dare to conduct decommunization of Russia. Yeltsin confined himself to banning the activities of the Communist Party of the USSR. In 1994, American adviser Jeffery Sachs advised Yeltsin to allow the activities of the Communist Party as a "systemic opposition." Yeltsin was an opponent of communism, but agreed to this. The result was the most sad.

Today, a revival of Stalinism is taking place in Russia. There is a "fashion for Stalin," and this fashion comes from the Kremlin.

For us, Russian monarchists and anti-communists, this is very sad. Many of the freedoms that we had in the 1990s are now missing. In fact, there is no free press in Russia, there are no independent political parties. During the years of Putin's rule, 17 million people, according to some sources, left Russia - the best people, scientists, writers, journalists, intellectual elite. For comparison: after the Bolshevik revolution in 1917, 3 million people left Russia.

Stalin has always been popular among lumpens, among people with poor education, and also among military and KGB officers. It is to this part of the electorate that Putin relies. Today's Stalinism - this is one of the varieties of populism, which is planted specifically. But very many people in Russia do not agree with this. Many people in Russia want to abandon the criminal Soviet past and condemn the crimes of the Communists. In Russia there are a lot of descendants of those who suffered from Bolshevism. But the voice of these people is not heard.

We hope that our like-minded people in other countries of the world understand this. We hope that you hear our voice.


__________________
Non Nobis, Domine, Non Nobis, Sed Nomini Tuo Da Gloriam!
DavidV

Registered:
Posts: 4,990
Reply with quote  #8 
Here is yet more proof of Russia's continued whitewashing of Stalin and his evil legacy:

http://khpg.org/en/index.php?id=1551837966

http://thedailychrenk.com/2019/04/17/stalin-popular-ever/

https://www.polygraph.info/a/lithuania-january-events-trial-fact-check/29901547.html
sir_Roman_D

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 102
Reply with quote  #9 

To talk about what Russia wants, you need to live in Russia and see the situation from the inside. I live in Russia and I see the situation from the inside.

"Putin favors the idea of restoring the Russian Monarchy"? Do not make me laugh! I am laughing.

"Russia is a conservative and nationalistic state"? Yes, if this nationalism and conservatism is SOVIET, Stalin, and not RUSSIAN.

"Nationalist state of Russia", ha ha ha. Why, then, many Russian nationalists are in prison? Why do Russian anti-communist conservatives emigrate from Russia and ask for political asylum in Europe and America?

Putin says: "Russia gets up from its knees." Russian conservatives anti-Communists respond to this in the following way: "It is not Russia that rises from its knees, it is Bolshevism that climbs out of the grave"


__________________
Non Nobis, Domine, Non Nobis, Sed Nomini Tuo Da Gloriam!
azadi

Registered:
Posts: 43
Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sir_Roman_D

To talk about what Russia wants, you need to live in Russia and see the situation from the inside. I live in Russia and I see the situation from the inside.

"Putin favors the idea of restoring the Russian Monarchy"? Do not make me laugh! I am laughing.

"Russia is a conservative and nationalistic state"? Yes, if this nationalism and conservatism is SOVIET, Stalin, and not RUSSIAN.

"Nationalist state of Russia", ha ha ha. Why, then, many Russian nationalists are in prison? Why do Russian anti-communist conservatives emigrate from Russia and ask for political asylum in Europe and America?

Putin says: "Russia gets up from its knees." Russian conservatives anti-Communists respond to this in the following way: "It is not Russia that rises from its knees, it is Bolshevism that climbs out of the grave"


I have never claimed, that Putin wants to restore the Russian monarchy. I was speaking about Sergey Aksyonov and Vsevolod Chaplin, who supports the restoration of the Russian monarchy.

I agree, that the whitewashing of Stalin, which is happening in Russia, and which is accepted by Putin, is wrong. Stalin's crimes ought to be exposed and condemned, just like Hitler's crimes are.

When I speak about the Putin government being conservative and nationalist, I'm comparing it to Western Europe and USA. It appears to be more conservative than Merkel's Germany, Macron's France, the US Democratic Party and even the mainstream Conservatives in Great Britain. Putin supports the revival of the Russian Orthodox Church and carried out the reunification of Crimea with Russia. I agree, that the Putin government is far from perfect, but I dislike the widespread Russophobia in USA and Europe. The Democrats and even many Republican congressmen claims, that Trump is a traitor, when he is negotiating with Putin in Helsinki. That's nonsense.

I'm surprised to hear about conservative Russian nationalists being in prison. I thought, that the non-Communist Russian opposition was dominated by pro-Western liberals like Garri Kasparov, Mikhail Khordorkovskiy and Boris Nemtsov.

When you speak about Russian nationalism being different from Soviet nationalism, I hope, that you aren't speaking about ethnic Russian chauvinism. Neo-Nazism and racism are sadly very widespread in Russia. I like Russia being a multiethnic country united by a shared Russian national identity and a shared cultural heritage. A Jew, a Yakut, a Buryat, a Kalmyk and an Ossetian is as Russian as a white Slavic Orthodox Christian ethnic Russian.

I'm a Kurd. We Kurds have always been friendly towards Russia, and Russia accepts Kurdish independence from Iraq unlike USA. A Kurdish minority, which is integrated into Russian society, lives in Russia. I dislike Russian neo-Nazis assaulting Kurds and other dark-skinned people.

I'm of German descent too. My ancestors were noblemen from present-day Saxony-Anhalt. I dislike, what Merkel is doing to Germany. Germany ought to rediscover the spirit of Bismarck and Hindenburg, proud conservative nationalist Prussian noblemen.

Despite the fact, that I'm a Kurd, I'm not a Muslim. I'm a Nestorian Christian.
sir_Roman_D

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 102
Reply with quote  #11 

I will answer you in order.

1. I do not know when Archpriest Vsevolod Chaplin was going to restore the Russian Monarchy. In Russia, if a person said “I am a monarchist,” then this does not mean anything, he did not say anything. Orthodox monarchists, Stalin’s supporters, neo-pagans, radical chauvinists, and some neo-Nazis, adherents of some youth subcultures, and many more call themselves “monarchists”. And most of these people have no idea about the monarchy. Rather, it is this or that fronda. If we talk about Vsevolod Chaplin, he is rather an Orthodox fundamentalist, not a monarchist. In addition, Vsevolod Chaplin made some statements about the need for close cooperation between the Russian Orthodox Church and the Communist Party of the Russian Federation (Gennady Zyuganov). A question to you personally: can a real Russian monarchist have sympathy for the communists in Russia?
2. You say that the rehabilitation policy of Stalin, which is now in Russia, is an “erroneous policy”. I do not agree with you: it is a regular policy, a terrible policy. And this is done on purpose.
3. The Russian Federation is not the heir to the Russian Empire. The Russian Federation is the heir of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic - a state that was proclaimed by Vladimir Lenin in October 1917. This state then refused to all obligations of the Russian Empire. Therefore, it is an OTHER state. Lenin himself said: "Russia was conquered by the Bolsheviks." In 1921, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic, as well as the puppet states of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic, the Belarusian Soviet Socialist Republic and the Transcaucasian Soviet Socialist Republic signed the so-called “union treaty” and formed the USSR. Then puppet states in Central Asia were attached to this treaty. The leadership of the USSR tried to subjugate the entire territory of the former Russian Empire, but it stumbled upon resistance in Finland, in the Baltics, and in Poland. I think all this is known to you, my dear friend. Today, the regime of Vladimir Putin is trying to restore the regime and the territory of the USSR, and not the Russian Empire. It is in this form that all actions, including the “annexation of the Crimea”, must be perceived.


__________________
Non Nobis, Domine, Non Nobis, Sed Nomini Tuo Da Gloriam!
sir_Roman_D

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 102
Reply with quote  #12 

4. You say that Vladimir Putin supports the Russian Orthodox Church. This is true. But one should not forget that there is this “Russian Orthodox Church”. This “Russian Orthodox Church” has nothing to do with the historic Russian Orthodox Church. The Moscow Patriarchate was founded by Joseph Stalin in 1943 under pressure from US President Roosevelt. The Moscow Patriarchate was created by Stalin as a “pocket church” and as the future “Soviet Orthodox Vatican”. Initially, there were very many security officers and secret agents in its ranks. These undercover agents denounced their flock. The modern Russian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate is the same Soviet institution of power as the KGB, the Komsomol or the Soviet trade unions, like the Red Army and others. It has nothing to do with historical Orthodoxy: before the creation of this “Red Church”, hundreds of thousands of bishops, priests and monks were physically destroyed, including my great-grandfather. The remnants of the historical Russian Church, which are in emigration (Europe, North America and South America) DO NOT RECOGNIZE the Soviet Moscow Patriarchate, and call it the “Church of the Red Satan”. It is this “church” that President Putin supports.
5. You argue that President Putin is “more conservative” than most conservative politicians in America and Europe. I disagree with this: President Putin is not a conservative, he is a red fundamentalist. Admit it: there is a huge difference between the concepts of "conservatism" and "fundamentalism", isn't it? The basis of conservatism is: a) respect for the Tradition; b) healthy pragmatism; v) reasonable self-restraint; e) the sacred principle of private property. There is nothing of this in the policy of the Russian president. Respect is ONLY for the Soviet "tradition" - and this damned "tradition" is imposed on the population; “The sacred principle of private property” is observed only in relation to large business, which is loyal to the authorities - at the same time, the rights of millions of small private entrepreneurs are not taken into account and are even violated; The corruption index in the Russian Federation is simply huge, and instead of “reasonable self-restraint” we see a terrible stratification into the super-rich establishment and impoverished population (most residents of the Russian Federation have an income of $ 400-500 per month. If this is “conservatism”? .. .


__________________
Non Nobis, Domine, Non Nobis, Sed Nomini Tuo Da Gloriam!
sir_Roman_D

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 102
Reply with quote  #13 

6. When I say that Russian nationalism is different from Soviet nationalism, I am not talking about any chauvinists and radicals. Russian national conservatism, like any European nationalism and conservatism, has an ideology of traditional Christian values, private property, national solidarity, guarantees of individual rights and non-acceptance of totalitarian ideology (even communism, even Nazism). In addition, it is simply silly to talk about ethnic nationalism in a multi-ethnic state: a considerable part of people here are of mixed origin (I myself have Polish origin on the mother’s side, and Georgian origin on the father’s side). The radical chauvinists, about whom you speak, who beat up your compatriots, are not a great and serious force; rather, they are small groups of hooligans. In Moscow and St. Petersburg, they were noticeable, but in all other cities there were no more than 10 to 12 people. They appeared as if from nowhere in the very beginning of the 2000s, and after a few years completely disappeared. Some analysts claim that “Russian neo-Nazis” and “Russian skinheads” were created as “a special project of the KGB and the police,” but I don’t know if this is so. At least, after 2010, this movement has almost completely disappeared, and nothing is heard about it.
7. When I speak about Russian nationalism, I look at things the same way as you: in our understanding, “Russian” is not an ethnic person, but anyone whose ancestors were like subjects of the Russian Emperor. The Russian Empire was created by many nations; a huge role in the creation of the Empire belongs to the German people - barons and knights from the Baltic; the Polish gentry, the Caucasian nobility, and many others played an important role. During the Great World War of 1914-1918, national legions from Bashkir, Buryat, Chechen, Kalmyk, Latvian, Turkmen and other people fought for the Russian Emperor. The imperial government forbade the recruitment of men from the northern nations into the army - this was done only because the northern nations are very few in number. Why do we have to be ethnic nationalists? ... why should we hate Yakuts, Buryats or some other people? ... Bolshevism brought grief and suffering to ALL peoples of the former Empire, Joseph Stalin did ethnic cleansing of Tatars of Crimea, Volga Germans, Highlanders of the Caucasus - we all suffered from Bolshevism. And all of us here have only one enemy - BOLSHEVISM, STALINISM, SOVIET POWER.


__________________
Non Nobis, Domine, Non Nobis, Sed Nomini Tuo Da Gloriam!
azadi

Registered:
Posts: 43
Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sir_Roman_D

I will answer you in order.

1. I do not know when Archpriest Vsevolod Chaplin was going to restore the Russian Monarchy. In Russia, if a person said “I am a monarchist,” then this does not mean anything, he did not say anything. Orthodox monarchists, Stalin’s supporters, neo-pagans, radical chauvinists, and some neo-Nazis, adherents of some youth subcultures, and many more call themselves “monarchists”. And most of these people have no idea about the monarchy. Rather, it is this or that fronda. If we talk about Vsevolod Chaplin, he is rather an Orthodox fundamentalist, not a monarchist. In addition, Vsevolod Chaplin made some statements about the need for close cooperation between the Russian Orthodox Church and the Communist Party of the Russian Federation (Gennady Zyuganov). A question to you personally: can a real Russian monarchist have sympathy for the communists in Russia?
2. You say that the rehabilitation policy of Stalin, which is now in Russia, is an “erroneous policy”. I do not agree with you: it is a regular policy, a terrible policy. And this is done on purpose.
3. The Russian Federation is not the heir to the Russian Empire. The Russian Federation is the heir of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic - a state that was proclaimed by Vladimir Lenin in October 1917. This state then refused to all obligations of the Russian Empire. Therefore, it is an OTHER state. Lenin himself said: "Russia was conquered by the Bolsheviks." In 1921, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic, as well as the puppet states of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic, the Belarusian Soviet Socialist Republic and the Transcaucasian Soviet Socialist Republic signed the so-called “union treaty” and formed the USSR. Then puppet states in Central Asia were attached to this treaty. The leadership of the USSR tried to subjugate the entire territory of the former Russian Empire, but it stumbled upon resistance in Finland, in the Baltics, and in Poland. I think all this is known to you, my dear friend. Today, the regime of Vladimir Putin is trying to restore the regime and the territory of the USSR, and not the Russian Empire. It is in this form that all actions, including the “annexation of the Crimea”, must be perceived.


1. Here is a link to Vsevolod Chaplin supporting restoration of the Russian monarchy: 
https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/749167/Vladimir-Putin-royal-emperor-Romanov-dynasty-Russia-powerful-Archpriest-Chaplin-monarchy
2. Are you opposed to the reunification of Crimea with Russia? The vast majority of Crimeans identifies as Russians. If you are a patriot, you ought to defend the just territorial claims of your nation, even if you dislike its government.
3. I'm not entirely opposed to the legacy of the USSR. The murder of Tsar Nikolay and his family, the forced collectivization of agriculture, the persecution of the Russian Orthodox Church and Stalin's purges were unacceptable, and whitewashing those crimes is unacceptable, but USSR did a lot of good things too. Illiteracy was eradicated, women obtained equal rights, university education and health care were free of charge and a strong social safety net was established. I admire Aleksandr Kazembek, the leader of the Mladorossi. The Mladorossi wanted to restore the Russian monarchy while keeping parts of the Soviet system. They used the motto "Tsar and the Soviets". Russia ought to restore the monarchy, while keeping the good parts of the Soviet legacy.
4. The Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia, the church of the White emigres, was reunified with the Moscow Patriarchate in 2007. Patriarch Kirill is a conservative, who supports traditional Christianity, while Pope Francis is a leftist, who support Arab and African mass immigration to Europe, who supports EU and who hates Trump. Are you an Orthodox Christian?
5. Most conservatives in Western Europe aren't true conservatives. They are liberals, who support globalism. Merkel and Macron aren't conservatives. Merkel allowed 1 million refugees to settle in Germany in 2015. Putin is opposed to gay marriage, and he doesn't allow Arab and African mass immigration to Russia.
6. I would like to know, if a significant traditionalist conservative opposition movement exists in Russia. I don't consider pro-Western liberals like Kasparov, Khordorkovskiy and Nemtsov preferable to Putin. 

sir_Roman_D

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 102
Reply with quote  #15 

I also answer in order:

1. Vsevolod Chaplin said a lot. Based on one of his statements can not draw conclusions about his preferences. I was one of the founders of the monarchist movement in Russia in 1988. I know all the monarchical figures of that time and later period. There was no Archpriest Chaplin among us. His "monarchism" is ordinary populism;

2. I am not a patriot of the Russian Federation. For me, this state is a continuation of the USSR, it has nothing to do with our murdered Empire. The same yesterday's communists and KGB officers rule here. The annexation of Crimea to the Russian Federation has nothing to do with us: what difference does the Crimea belong to: nationalist Ukraine or Stalinists from the Kremlin? Their joys are not my joys.

3. You are misinformed, my dear sir. The elimination of illiteracy was initiated by the Imperial Government. The chief procurator of the Holy Synod, Konstantin Pobedonostsev, was the organizer of hundreds of thousands of elementary schools at each church (this was called Ts. P. Sh. — Parish schools). Female discrimination in the Russian Empire was no more than in other states of that time: the right to vote was based on the “one family - one vote in the election” scheme, women had no training bans and no occupational bans.

Lev Kazem-Bek was a spy for the OGPU-NKVD. He is hated by our White immigrants. His party of the Young Russians is nothing more than an “Orthodox Komsomol”, this is disgusting, disgusting. After 1945, Lev Kazem-Bek moved to the USSR and worked in the red Stalinist Moscow Patriarchate. The absolute majority of Russian monarchists treat this man as a provocateur and a scoundrel. Our Grand Prince Vladimir Kirillovich, who was the Head of the Dynasty from 1938 to 1992, was under the influence of this man in his youth, but later ceased all relations with him. For Russian monarchists, any sympathy for the Young Russian party is a very bad recommendation.

4. The Russian Orthodox Church Abroad in 2007 had a great schism. Some of its parts were united with the Moscow Patriarchate, but not all. Those who joined the Moscow Patriarchate are traitors who sold the birthright for lentils. In Europe, in the USA, in Chile and Argentina, in Paraguay, there remained the dioceses of the Orthodox Church Outside of Russia, which did not wish to unite with the Stalinist "church." Kirill Gundyaev - certainly a "conservative" - but a Soviet conservative, not Russian. I am not an Orthodox Christian, though there are many Orthodox priests, monks and laity among my friends; I belong to the Universal Roman Catholic Church.

5. Believe me: same-sex marriage, gay parades and other inventions of the “new left” are not the main danger for Russia. Nobody cares about it here. Local gays themselves do not want to advertise their relationship. But even gay people are the same people, and their rights must be protected by law. I am sure that if a gay parade is allowed in Russia, then no more than a hundred gays will come to him - and another two or two spectators who will laugh and smile. No gay parades here will break traditional Christian values. The main danger for Russia is not this. I have already spoken about corruption: it is terrible, terrible. My dear friend, you write that Vladimir Putin does not allow refugees from Africa and from the countries of the Arab world into Russia. It's right. But Vladimir Putin let Chinese citizens and Chinese business into Russia. This is scary. Here, in Siberia, the taiga is barbarously cut down; wood, millions of cubic meters of wood are sent to China every day. Wood is sold for nothing. Today, the Chinese Communist Republic is the main supplier of wood to America and to Europe. But in the Chinese Communist Republic, deforestation is FORBIDDEN. My dear friend, please guess the riddle: WHERE does China sell the wood it sells to other countries? ... Chinese citizens buy housing here, buy land here, buy infrastructure; local residents are protesting, but there are no results. I live in Siberia, and I see it with my own eyes. This is scary, scary.

6. In Russia there is no opposition movement that would be massive and influential. Neither conservative nor liberal, not even leftist. No And this is the result of twenty years of the rule of the “conservative” Vladimir Putin. His government does not need any opposition, and she (the opposition) is successfully suppressed. In 2011, something that had never happened before happened: after the results of the parliamentary elections were falsified, Russian liberals and Russian conservatives united. From that time on, a very interesting process began: quite a few liberal figures began to drift to the right. Now all the opposition in Russia exists semi-legally, each protest is dispersed by the police. Boris Nemtsov was very close to the Russian conservatives, and it would be good if he had not been killed and would have become the President of Russia. This would enable the Russian liberal-conservative opposition to unite and get a majority. Russian conservatives and liberals are moving towards each other, and together we could turn Russia into a civilized European state and stop left fundamentalists, red Nazis and Stalinists. But for now you can only dream about it.


__________________
Non Nobis, Domine, Non Nobis, Sed Nomini Tuo Da Gloriam!
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.