Monarchy Forum
Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
DavidV

Registered:
Posts: 5,100
Reply with quote  #1 
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/tehranbureau/2012/04/media-watch-rafsanjani-i-wanted-to-reestablish-ties-with-us-but-could-not.html

Interesting and revealing words from Rafsanjani which only exposes deeper rifts within the political and clerical elites of Iran. He's been increasingly marginalised by the hardliners currently in power and now feuding amongst themselves. As I did say, the more they keep feuding, the more schisms keep occuring as they always do, the more this vile regime appears doomed- it will be pulled down from within its own ranks.
royalcello

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 6,830
Reply with quote  #2 
But will the monarchy be restored?  I'm sick of vile revolutionary regimes falling only to be replaced by republics that "everyone" seems to think are acceptable and find it hard to get excited just because a regime I hate has internal problems.
DutchMonarchist

Registered:
Posts: 858
Reply with quote  #3 

Quote:
Originally Posted by royalcello
But will the monarchy be restored?  I'm sick of vile revolutionary regimes falling only to be replaced by republics that "everyone" seems to think are acceptable and find it hard to get excited just because a regime I hate has internal problems.

I won't say you must get excited about it, but you could still see it as a positive development instead of being sick about it. If you claim that democratic republics aren't any better than tyrannic ones in order to discredit the former, that feels to me like downplaying how evil regimes like the Iranian one are. For example, there is nothing inconsistent about saying Russia today is a far better place to live that the Soviet Union was and at the same time wishing for the Russian monarchy to be restored.

royalcello

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 6,830
Reply with quote  #4 
I suppose.  I just feel like restorationist monarchists are in a no-win situation because if things are really bad, people say "there are more important things to worry about right now," but if things aren't so bad, people say, "well the republic seems to be working OK, why bother restoring the monarchy?"  It's very frustrating.
DavidV

Registered:
Posts: 5,100
Reply with quote  #5 
I did talk about my approach to the matter here about restoring monarchies and winning hearts and minds to the cause. And we can't even objectively compare Iran to any European country when it comes to restoration. Restoration is still feasible in the Balkans, in Georgia when the current regime falls, and maybe more in Portugal than in France, Germany or Italy right now. Iran has immense historical complexities regarding ideologies and loyalties which I've explained on here and also in this period article.

What we're dealing with here is a regime that thinks nothing of mowing down protesters, even persecuting clerics who speak out against it (at least one ayatollah and one grand ayatollah are currently behind bars), not to mention any political movement, even Islamic ones, which openly opposes the system operating in the IRI, and executing their supporters (most notably leftists and monarchists). And one of the Green Movement's leaders and defeated presidential candidate Mehdi Karroubi even said in an interview that the Shah never used the sort of brute force against dissent that this regime does. It can't even be compared to the struggle against Communism, in which all opposed to Communism pretty much stuck together, which disparate opponents of the regime in Iran didn't do for many years due to the complex relationships and past divisions.

The fact that the current regime has not only virtually abolished its only concession to "democracy" and that there are some who may even want to go as far as do away with constitutionalism and elections in favour of an absolute theocracy (which at least would be honest) will not do their survival any favours. Rafsanjani lies at the very heart of the IRI's establishment, is very wealthy and well-connected (and has cordial relations with Arab rulers that Iran's current rulers don't have), but he's straddled the lines between the conservative and reformist camps though now veering to the latter since he's been increasingly marginalised by the former. Now Rafsanjani and Khatami were genuine in their attempts to ease tensions with the West and temper the system's excesses, but their efforts were frustrated at every turn (as Rafsanjani himself attributes in the article) by the hardline clerics and their political allies.

First they purged all those who opposed Khomeini's Islamic Republic system (between 1980 and 1982). Then, following the 1988 mass executions and Khomeini's death, the schisms into the two current camps began, never mind many of those who have been politically active in this time that have fled the country, or are now in jail or house arrest. They've not only shut down Rafsanjani's website, they've also jailed his daughter and confiscated his son's passport. The suppression of the Green Movement seals the most recent schism, and now we are seeing the group in power fighting among themselves (between loyalists of Khamenei and Ahmadinejad, and the more "pragmatic" Mohsen Rezaei and Ali Motahari). Opposition to the hardline faction of clerics around Khamenei is not merely political, but also religious because they actually are seen as lacking legitimacy and religious credentials in comparison to the more moderate voices!

It's been difficult enough overcoming differences among the exiled and banned/underground opposition groups to build an alliance although this is becoming easier as they unite against a common enemy. And the suppression of the Green Movement means a whole other group on the "out", whether they can establish any links with the opposition groups described above remains to be seen. So in a nutshell, Iran's current rulers may be unintentionally paving the way for their own downfall, but how this can be brought about is another matter- will it come entirely from within Iran, or with the help of the exile and underground groups? Will the historical differences prevent unity, or are these being ironed out?
clark

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,066
Reply with quote  #6 
While I understand Theodore's concern, I imagine the over throw of the Islamic republic and the institution of some other government could only benefit monarchists, much as the fall of the soviet union in Russia has helped bring monarchist ideas back into the public debate.
DavidV

Registered:
Posts: 5,100
Reply with quote  #7 
It's not even out of first gear yet in Iran and there won't be anything like a smooth transition out of tyranny that there was in Eastern Europe or Latin America. There is no way either that the current regime is going to end peacefully even if overthrown from within. What monarchists should do (and are doing) is seek to win converts and build alliances. Iranian monarchists appear to be doing so among the exile groups already. How prepared they and everyone else is for a revolution in Iran remains to be seen.
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.