Monarchy Forum
Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 2 of 2      Prev   1   2
Murtagon

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 55
Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by azadi

In Kurdistan, primary school lasts for 9 years and is compulsory. Children start to attend primary school at the age of 6. Secondary school lasts for 3 years. Education at state universities is free of charge in Kurdistan, while tuition fees are charged at private universities in Kurdistan.
Do you have to pay tuition fees at university in Bulgaria?


Yes, regardless of whether the university or college is private or not. For instance, for my eight semesters I had to pay 8 x 231 BGN = 1848 BGN, which is about 945 Euro. If I had not received state support, I would have had to pay more than 1000 BGN per semester, as my foreign colleagues did.

As for ordinary school, children are supposed to start attending at 6 or 7 (the latter is what happened to me). Primary school and Secondary school last for 7 years together (4 + 3 years) and high school adds five more years. This means that I was a pupil for 12 years.
azadi

Registered:
Posts: 389
Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Murtagon


Yes, regardless of whether the university or college is private or not. For instance, for my eight semesters I had to pay 8 x 231 BGN = 1848 BGN, which is about 945 Euro. If I had not received state support, I would have had to pay more than 1000 BGN per semester, as my foreign colleagues did.

As for ordinary school, children are supposed to start attending at 6 or 7 (the latter is what happened to me). Primary school and Secondary school last for 7 years together (4 + 3 years) and high school adds five more years. This means that I was a pupil for 12 years.

Why has Bulgaria abolished free university education? Russia has kept free university education, and Poland has kept free university education too. Among countries, which never had a Communist regime, Germany, the Scandinavian countries, Turkey and Brazil provide free university education.
Murtagon

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 55
Reply with quote  #18 
I'm afraid that I cannot answer your question properly. After a brief research, I am left with the impression that universities are not "wealthy" enough to provide higher education for free. There is also the fact that a lot of people apparently decide to study after graduating from high school.

Incidentally, a year ago I studied for a semester at a private college in Prague, all thanks to the Erasmus+ programme. Anyway, while speaking to one of my lecturers there, I found out that students at Charles University (named after Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV, highly revered by the Czechs) study for free, as long as it is in the Czech language. Thus, a strategy for foreigners was to learn the language to some extent in their first year and then switch to Czech-only courses and subjects, so they wouldn't have to pay.

On a related note, my University here also offers Informatics. When the government decided a couple of years ago that we needed more IT specialists and less accountants, many (if not all) such institutions had the first semester be free of charge, in order to obviously attract more students for that speciality. Fortunately, those that had already paid got their money back.

There is a popular sentence here in Bulgaria: "Study, son, so you don't become a tractor driver". Yeah...

azadi

Registered:
Posts: 389
Reply with quote  #19 
Kurdistan currently doesn't have a written constitution. A lot of subnational entities have their own constitutions. The Länder (states) of Germany, the autonomous republics of Russia and the states of USA have their own constitutions. The only democratic sovereign states, which lack a written constitution are Great Britain, New Zealand and Israel. Due to Kurdistan being close to being a de facto independent state, Kurdistan can be considered the fourth democratic country without a written constitution.


azadi

Registered:
Posts: 389
Reply with quote  #20 
It's surprising, that no other member of the forum has drafted a proposed constitution of his or her country, as far as I know. It's especially surprising, that none of the British members of the forum have drafted a proposed written constitution of Great Britain. 
bator

Registered:
Posts: 222
Reply with quote  #21 
i have a question for you azazi. there is a wikipedia article about the kingdom of kurdistan of barzanji, and the flag is shown, but no coat of arms. do you know what the coat of arms looked like or where it could be found?
azadi

Registered:
Posts: 389
Reply with quote  #22 
As far as I know, Mahmud Barzanji's Kingdom of Kurdistan had no coat of arms. No coat of arms is shown in the article about Mahmud Barzanji's Kingdom of Kurdistan on Kurdish-language Wikipedia.
I prefer the current flag of Kurdistan to the flag of Mahmud Barzanji's Kingdom of Kurdistan, because I prefer the radiant yellow sun to the crescent. The crescent is too Islamic and Turkish, while the radiant yellow sun is an ancient symbol of Kurdistan. In addition, I like the Pan-Iranic red-white-green tricolor. The current flag of Kurdistan has never been used by a monarchy, but it isn't anti-monarchist. 
I admire Mahmud Barzanji as a great Kurdish freedom fighter, but he sadly never managed to unify the Kurdish people. Many Kurdish tribes opposed him, and he never managed to control all of South (Iraqi) Kurdistan. His rule was limited to the Sulaimani region. None of his descendants have claimed the throne of Kurdistan, and his descendants aren't considered royal by the Kurds. His son Baba Ali Barzanji was a minister in the government of Abd al-Karim Qasim. Abd al-Karim Qasim, who overthrew the Hashemite monarchy of Iraq and established the Republic of Iraq, was of Kurdish descent and granted the Kurds more linguistic rights and he was an opponent of Pan-Arabism. He was overthrown and killed by Arab nationalists in 1963.
I prefer an Osmanoglu monarchy in Kurdistan, because the Osmanoglus were the last dynasty, to which the vast majority of Kurds were loyal. But monarchism is insignificant among Kurds, because the Osmanoglus are considered descendants of foreign rulers, the Hashemites are disliked, because the Hashemite kings of Iraq oppressed the Kurds and the memory of Mahmud Barzanji isn't linked to monarchism. Mahmud Barzanji is considered a hero by most Kurds, but he is remembered as a freedom fighter rather than as a king.
The only remotely plausible way to establish a Kurdish monarchy is a prince of a currently reigning dynasty marrying a Kurdish woman. If a European royal from a current European monarchy married a woman from the Kurdish diaspora of his country, monarchism may become significant among Kurds. Prince Joachim of Denmark was married to a Chinese woman from Hong Kong, and Prince Harry is married to a black American. 
bator

Registered:
Posts: 222
Reply with quote  #23 
thank you very much. i had of course checked the kurdish language wikipedia myself, but the coat of arms not being there is no certain proof that it didnt exist. many regions of countries have coats of arms even if not showed on the wikipedia article about them.

do you happen to know the name of barzinjis oldest son, and when he died, and the name of his oldest son and so on, so i can see what the line of kings would have been if he had stayed king?

do you have a guess or suggestion what you think the coat of arms of his kingdom would have been?
azadi

Registered:
Posts: 389
Reply with quote  #24 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bator
thank you very much. i had of course checked the kurdish language wikipedia myself, but the coat of arms not being there is no certain proof that it didnt exist. many regions of countries have coats of arms even if not showed on the wikipedia article about them.

do you happen to know the name of barzinjis oldest son, and when he died, and the name of his oldest son and so on, so i can see what the line of kings would have been if he had stayed king?

do you have a guess or suggestion what you think the coat of arms of his kingdom would have been?

Mahmud Barzanji had three sons. The oldest son of Mahmud Barzanji was Rauf Barzanji, who was a member of the Iraqi parliament. The second son of Mahmud Barzanji was Baba Ali Barzanji, who was a minister in the government of Qasim. Qasim took power in a coup in 1958, which established the Republic of Iraq. The last King of Iraq was murdered during Qasim's coup. Qasim was of Kurdish descent and granted the Kurds more linguistic rights in Iraq. Qasim was pro-Soviet. Qasim was overthrown and killed by Arab nationalists in 1963. The youngest son of Mahmud Barzanji was Latif Barzanji, who was a vice president of the Kurdistan Democratic Party, which is currently one of the major political parties of Kurdistan.
Latif Barzanji had a son called Kawa, who was a member of the Kurdish regional parliament, which was established according to the failed autonomy deal between the Kurdish independence movement and the Iraqi government in 1970. The deal failed, because the Iraqi government granted us insufficient autonomy.
I don't know about other descendants of Mahmud Barzanji. 


Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.