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azadi

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Reply with quote  #1 
Jacinda Ardern, the Labour Prime Minister of New Zealand, has decided to leave the final decision in a dispute concerning land claimed by the Maori to the Maori King. By doing that, she implicitly recognizes the Maori King, who isn't formally recognized by the state, unlike other ceremonial sub-national monarchies such as the Zulu King and the Kabaka of Buganda in Uganda. The government of New Zealand ought to formally recognize the Maori monarchy as a ceremonial sub-national monarchy.
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/sep/18/new-zealand-maori-king-says-disputed-ihumatao-land-should-be-returned


azadi

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Reply with quote  #2 
Jacinda Ardern is the Corbyn of New Zealand. Her government has restricted the right of foreigners to buy property in New Zealand, and her government has improved the welfare system of New Zealand. I like the economic policies of Jacinda Ardern and her support for the Maori monarchy. She wants to abolish the Windsor monarchy of New Zealand, but fortunately it's not a priority of her government. If I was a citizen of New Zealand, I would vote for the Labour Party. But if a republic referendum is held in New Zealand, I will support keeping the Windsor monarchy. Windsor rule of New Zealand is legitimate, because the Maori voluntarily swore allegiance to Queen Victoria in the Treaty of Waitangi. But if New Zealand decides to dissolve the personal union with Great Britain, I will support making the Maori King the King of New Zealand, and Pakehas (white New Zealanders) ought to support the Maori King in such circumstances, just as Haoles (white Hawaiians) currently ought to support restoration of the native Hawaiian monarchy. If making the Maori King the King of New Zealand is unacceptable to the Pakehas, I will support electing a Windsor, who won't inherit the throne of Great Britain, the King or Queen of New Zealand.
Windemere

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Reply with quote  #3 
I hope that New Zealand remains a dominion under Queen Elizabeth II. However, it would be nice if New Zealand would institute a native peerage system of nobility  for the Maori king and his descendants. If there are any Maori tribal rules or traditions regulating such a system, then they could be adopted. Otherwise, it could go by the British peerage system. I'm not advocating any large-scale creation of nobility that might not be looked upon favorably in modern egalitarian New Zealand, and certainly no special privileges under the law,   but rather a limited titular peerage based upon hereditary descent from the old Maori tribal chiefdoms and kingdom. 

One of the Gloucester daughters was married to a young New Zealander of Maori descent, and though they are now divorced, they do have 2 children. So the extended Windsor family does now have some New Zealandic, as well as Maori, representation.

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azadi

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Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Windemere
I hope that New Zealand remains a dominion under Queen Elizabeth II. However, it would be nice if New Zealand would institute a native peerage system of nobility  for the Maori king and his descendants. If there are any Maori tribal rules or traditions regulating such a system, then they could be adopted. Otherwise, it could go by the British peerage system. I'm not advocating any large-scale creation of nobility that might not be looked upon favorably in modern egalitarian New Zealand, and certainly no special privileges under the law,   but rather a limited titular peerage based upon hereditary descent from the old Maori tribal chiefdoms and kingdom. 

One of the Gloucester daughters was married to a young New Zealander of Maori descent, and though they are now divorced, they do have 2 children. So the extended Windsor family does now have some New Zealandic, as well as Maori, representation.

Reducing the Maori King to a mere nobleman is wrong. The Maori King ought to be recognized by the state as a ceremonial sub-national monarch similar to the Zulu King and the Kabaka of Buganda in Uganda.
TuiMangareva

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by azadi

Reducing the Maori King to a mere nobleman is wrong. The Maori King ought to be recognized by the state as a ceremonial sub-national monarch similar to the Zulu King and the Kabaka of Buganda in Uganda.


Other Polynesian countries recognise the Maori King almost as a head of state. He is always present at royal events in Tonga where he regularly sits alongside the Tongan King.
ROO86

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Reply with quote  #6 
The Kīngitanga movement would need to firstly get acceptance amongst the Maori population; which it doesn’t currently have. The “Maori King” is only recognised as such by a handful of Iwi in the upper North Island.
azadi

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ROO86
The Kīngitanga movement would need to firstly get acceptance amongst the Maori population; which it doesn’t currently have. The “Maori King” is only recognised as such by a handful of Iwi in the upper North Island.

TuiMangareva isn't speaking of making the Maori King the King of Aotearoa/New Zealand. He is speaking of the fact, that the King of Tonga recognizes him as a peer.
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