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PinoyMonk

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Hello all,

In various threads, some dates popped up (particularly in regards to wearing the black armbands).  Perhaps we can use this thread to list out the most important dates throughout the year that have a great significance to us.  So, who wants to start?  =P  What are the most important dates to you and why?  For those wearing the armbands, please tell whether or not those are appropriate for the given date.

Thanks,

Pinoy Monk


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kingstowngalway

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The reason I suggested June 28 for a black armband day is that on June 28, 1914 the Archduke Franz Ferdinand von Oestereich-Este was murdered alongside his wife, the former Countess Sophie Chotek, in Sarajevo. Their murders led directly to the First World War and the destruction of the Old Order in Europe. Therefore it should be a day of mourning to all Monarchists in my opinion. Also I suggested November 11, which is the anniversary of the end of World War I and the triumph of Woodrow Wilson's desire to overthrow the Kings and Emperors of Old Europe and replace them with American style Republics. As this is also Veteran's Day in America and REmembrance Day in the British Commonwealth, this is a day on which it would attract a LOT of attention to someone wearing a black armband. COnversations would be joined and Monarchists would be able to explain and defend their opinions. This is how I see it. kingstowngalway


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royalcello

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For anniversaries of regicides and other murders of royalty, see this list I made:
http://www.royaltymonarchy.com/royfacts/victims.html

Each year on my website I list some round-numbered monarchical anniversaries for that year:
http://www.royaltymonarchy.com/sovereigns/anniversaries.html

An important and sad one in 2006 is the bicentennial of the abdication of the last Holy Roman Emperor on August 6.
WhiteCockade

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In the group I moderate (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Catholicmonarchists/)

we are discussing the black band for the 4th of July as a Loyalist statement. 


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royalcello

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One of the "Intolerable Acts" which the American revolutionaries found so provocative was the Quebec Act in which George III granted toleration to Catholics in Quebec.

The myth that the American Revolution was essentially "conservative" and different in kind, rather than degree, from the French Revolution has been refuted by objective scholars such as Gordon Wood. The American revolutionaries did not go as far as the French revolutionaries, but it was still an unjust rebellion against a lawful Christian sovereign.

As for the Jacobite issue, the fact that the Holy See did not extend to Bonnie Prince Charlie the recognition it had given his father when the latter died in 1766 may be interpreted as Rome's acceptance of the legitimacy of the Hanoverian dynasty. Most of the Jacobites who had settled in America, such as Flora MacDonald, supported the Loyalist cause as they understood that the principle of monarchy was more important than the occupant.

As Christopher Ferrara argued recently, to the anti-Catholic American revolutionaries, the British monarchy, as a monarchy allied to an established church, represented the remnants of Catholic social order.

George III was a good man and a well-meaning king. He does not deserve the reputation foisted on him by American propaganda.

I'd recommend this article by the late John Attarian, a Catholic:
http://www.lewrockwell.com/attarian/attarian9.html

I don't know if I will be wearing a black armband, but I certainly will not mark Independence Day with enthusiasm. As I told the Yahoo! group, last year I spent July 4 listening to British royalist music in my car as I drove from Charlotte (named after George III's wife) to Indianapolis. I proudly display portraits of King George III and Queen Charlotte in my apartment, and my sympathies regarding the conflict of 1775-83 lie firmly with the loyalists.

July 4 is nothing to celebrate and I am surprised that any monarchist would feel differently. One can accept that a return to monarchy in the U.S. is not likely or even worth pursuing, but that doesn't mean we have to be happy about it.
WhiteCockade

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Jacobite,

 

      It is interesting that Poland should not rebel against the foreign Czar, but English American’s can rebel against George III who they had always recognized as their sovereign.   It was not the French Revolution, and yet for the Founding Fathers (to whom I claim no sonship) it was an attack on the Altar and the Throne.  

    May I remind all here that it was the Founding Fathers who were opposed to the lifting of said  laws in the Quebec territory and that they lists the Quebec Act (giving tolerance to Catholics in Quebec) among the intolerable acts.  Some propaganda at the time claimed George III was secretly a Catholic. The fact is that there were serious penal laws against Catholics in the colonies and the majority of them liked it that way.   While they would come to support the error of religious liberty, they were not fighting to give freedom to Catholics nor can we say this was a Jacobite uprising.  Many of them were Freemasons and deists who were opposed in one way or another to Christianity.   I recommend an article written by Christopher Ferrari entitled "Rebels Without a Cause".


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WhiteCockade

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Might I also add to the Jacobite issue that this rebellion was as much against him as it was against George III.  If they thought George too much the papist what would they have thought of Charles? If you are a staunch Jacobite you must admit the rebellion stole the colonies away from him. 


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royalcello

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacobite
   Louis XVI, if memory serves, had little difficulty backing the Americans against their "king".


...reluctantly and against his better judgment, persuaded by anti-British advisors. This was Louis XVI's worst mistake and in my opinion the only sense in which he can be blamed for the French Revolution, as aiding the Americans was the last straw in bankrupting the French treasury, precipitating the crisis of 1789.
WhiteCockade

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France had recently lost its North American colonies to Great Britain and Louis XVI was advised poorly (some claim maliciously) to check British power.  


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WhiteCockade

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Quote:
Originally Posted by royalcello
The American revolutionaries did not go as far as the French revolutionaries, but it was still an unjust rebellion against a lawful Christian sovereign.

 

 

 

I would only add (not that it much matters now) that the French Revolution was bloodier because it took place in the motherland and had to over throw an entire nation wide institution which united altar and throne.  The colonists need only intimidate loyalist and break the will of an already beleaguered Great Britain.   The situation was different but that should not give the impression that it was less radical than the French Revolution.

Thomas Jefferson wrote that, “To attain all this (universal republicanism), however, rivers of blood must yet flow, and years of desolation pass over; yet the object is worth rivers of blood, and years of desolation.”  Words worthy of any Jacobin.


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