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DavidV

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Recently I've posted a few articles highlighting the fact that in Australia, and in the Commonwealth generally, republicanism is in retreat - something the most recent federal election confirmed given Shorten's republic push did not go down well with voters. Republicans know they've lost, some of them even publicly admit it. And some who may have been republicans have even crossed over to our side on this.

I've offered a number of reasons in a previous post here - public indifference to debate on the issue, the view the system works well for most people, republicans themselves turning off most people, domestic and international political factors among other things.

And also the waning of the Baby Boomer generation, a similar trend noticed with Quebec separatism. Could it be part of a wider trend where many of the fashionable ideas of the latter half of the 20th Century, of which republicanism for the sake of republicanism is part, is waning? We can't say the same about separatism (see Catalonia).

The bottom line is that republicanism may not become extinct, but it is largely consigned to irrelevance for most people. It isn't just in Britain and the Commonwealth, but in most monarchies currently existing appear to me to be secure with no desire among a majority of their populace for abolition.

And here I present the bigger question. The challenge of merely preserving a country's monarchy, differing considerably from country to country, is very different to the challenge of wanting to restore a country's monarchy. Doing the former is generally easier than doing the latter. A complete turning in favour of one system or another rarely happens unless a country undergoes a monumental historical experience, or in short hand, something like a national existential crisis.

The short form question (well shorter form!) I'm going to ask is this. If republicans have utterly failed to persuade most people in existing monarchies, how then can monarchists persuade most people in former monarchies to restore them? It is very different according to regional situation - Eastern European ones being talked about here present a radically different case to prospects for restoration in Iran, Libya or Ethiopia (just to mention three countries with a "crisis experience" of greater immediacy). What are the strategies and tactics to be employed to winning people over in this?

azadi

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Posts: 45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidV

Recently I've posted a few articles highlighting the fact that in Australia, and in the Commonwealth generally, republicanism is in retreat - something the most recent federal election confirmed given Shorten's republic push did not go down well with voters. Republicans know they've lost, some of them even publicly admit it. And some who may have been republicans have even crossed over to our side on this.

I've offered a number of reasons in a previous post here - public indifference to debate on the issue, the view the system works well for most people, republicans themselves turning off most people, domestic and international political factors among other things.

And also the waning of the Baby Boomer generation, a similar trend noticed with Quebec separatism. Could it be part of a wider trend where many of the fashionable ideas of the latter half of the 20th Century, of which republicanism for the sake of republicanism is part, is waning? We can't say the same about separatism (see Catalonia).

The bottom line is that republicanism may not become extinct, but it is largely consigned to irrelevance for most people. It isn't just in Britain and the Commonwealth, but in most monarchies currently existing appear to me to be secure with no desire among a majority of their populace for abolition.

And here I present the bigger question. The challenge of merely preserving a country's monarchy, differing considerably from country to country, is very different to the challenge of wanting to restore a country's monarchy. Doing the former is generally easier than doing the latter. A complete turning in favour of one system or another rarely happens unless a country undergoes a monumental historical experience, or in short hand, something like a national existential crisis.

The short form question (well shorter form!) I'm going to ask is this. If republicans have utterly failed to persuade most people in existing monarchies, how then can monarchists persuade most people in former monarchies to restore them? It is very different according to regional situation - Eastern European ones being talked about here present a radically different case to prospects for restoration in Iran, Libya or Ethiopia (just to mention three countries with a "crisis experience" of greater immediacy). What are the strategies and tactics to be employed to winning people over in this?


In order to make restoration of monarchies possible, monarchists must embrace democracy, freedom of religion and equality before the law for non-royals. A lot of internet monarchists reject the legacy of the French Revolution and desire the return of feudalism. That turns most people living in democratic republics off. A monarchy must be an addition to democracy, not an alternative to democracy. A king in a constitutional monarchy is a non-partisan head of state, who embodies the history and the traditions of a nation.



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