Monarchy Forum
Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 4 of 4      Prev   1   2   3   4
Murtagon

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 237
Reply with quote  #46 
Thanks, Peter! I gave both links a little more time and they did open successfully in the end. In any case, I would say it is rather unusual that the two men were so distantly related, especially as they were from the same House. A possible explanation could be their rank. As counts, they would have had the opportunity to choose brides from a much larger pool, which would not quite have been the case for a King or even a Duke. That's my theory anyway.
Murtagon

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 237
Reply with quote  #47 
Dynasty №17: House of Reuß

Continuing with the Uradel theme, we arrive at Reuss, which descends from Erkenbert I von Weida (c. 1090 - 1163). As can be expected, it is also multibranched. Below, you will find the two that still reigned during the German Empire (1871 - 1918). It appears that their common agnatic ancestor was Heinrich XIV Reuss (1464 - 1535).
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The eldest surviving son of Heinrich XIV was Heinrich XIV/I Reuss zu Untergreiz (1506 - 1572). The descent begins with the first descendant of his to gain the title of Prince in 1778.

I. House of Reuss-Greiz (Elder line):
  1. Heinrich XI, Prince Reuss of Greiz (1722 - 1800), father of...
  2. Heinrich XIII, Prince Reuss of Greiz (1747 - 1817), father of...
  3. Heinrich XIX, Prince Reuss of Greiz (1790 - 1836), brother of...
  4. Heinrich XX, Prince Reuss of Greiz (1794 - 1859), father of...
  5. Heinrich XXII, Prince Reuss of Greiz (1846 - 1902), father of...
  6. Heinrich XXIV, Prince Reuss of Greiz (1878 - 1927).
Sadly, the monarchy was abolished in late 1918. Even more unfortunately, the Elder line went extinct less than a decade later. The dynastic representation thus went to the junior line.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The youngest surviving son of Heinrich XIV was Heinrich XVI Reuss zu Plauen (1530 - 1572). The descent begins with the first descendant of his to gain the title of prince in 1806.

I. House of Reuss-Gera (Younger line):
  1. Heinrich XLII, Prince Reuss-Schleiz und Gera (1752 - 1818), father of...
  2. Heinrich LXII, Prince Reuss Younger Line (1785 - 1854), brother of...
  3. Heinrich LXVII, Prince Reuss Younger Line (1789 - 1867), father of...
  4. Heinrich XIV, Prince Reuss Younger Line (1832 - 1913), father of...
  5. Heinrich XXVII, Prince Reuss Younger Line (1858 - 1928), father of...
  6. Heinrich XLV, Hereditary Prince Reuss Younger Line (1895 - c. 1945).
Sadly, the monarchy was abolished in late 1918. Even more unfortunately, the Younger line went extinct with the disappearance of the last heir apparent in 1945. Thankfully, the branch isn't fully extinct, as there seem to be quite a lot of dynasts left. This means that I-6 may have been succeeded by his sixth (half-) cousin, as seen below:
  1. Heinrich XXXIX, Prinz Reuss (1891 - 1946), father of...
  2. Heinrich IV, Prince Reuss of Köstritz (1919 - 2012), father of...
  3. Heinrich XIV, Prince Reuss of Köstritz (b. 1955).
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

You may now have two burning questions:

1) Why is everyone called "Heinrich"? - In honour of Henry VI, Holy Roman Emperor (1165 - 1197), whose German name is Heinrich.

2) Why the strange numbers? - Because of the above. The elder line used a simple system: from 1 to 100... but I'm left with the impression that they may have never reached that number. The younger line counts from the beginning of a new century until its end... and then again, and again.

P.S. Peter, would you please add this House to the others? Thank you!
Windemere

Registered:
Posts: 462
Reply with quote  #48 
Thank you, Murtagon, for posting that comprehensive survey of the Houses of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen and Hohenzollern-Hechingen (Post #44 above).

The old Sigmaringen and Hechingen lands are now located in the modern German bundesland (province) of Baden-Wurttemberg, in southwest Germany. They lie between the lands of the former Grand Duchy of Baden to the west, and the former Kingdom of Wurttemberg to the east. Baden-Wurttemberg in the early Middle Ages was the ancient German stem (tribal) Duchy of Swabia.

The mother of Constantine, the last prinz von Hohenzollern-Hechingen, was Pauline, the second daughter of Peter von Biron, the last Duke of Courland. Courland was an autonomous duchy within the Polish-Lithuanian kingdom.  Peter ceded his duchy (now a province of the modern Baltic nation of Latvia) to Russia, in conjunction with the Third Partition of Poland in 1795. Pauline's elder sister was known to have given birth to an illegitimate son, but Pauline's von Rothenburg descendants with Constantine are likely the senior legitimate cognatic von Biron representatives. And so, in the unlikely event of a restoration of the Duchy of Courland, they might have some sort of claim.

Peter, Duke of Courland, was only the 2nd member of his family to rule in Courland.  The previous ruling family were the Kettlers, who'd  ruled that duchy from 1561 until their extinction in male-line in 1737. And so an alternate claim to Courland might be sought in their cognatic descendants. As far as I know, the von Birons had no known descent from the Kettlers.

There still exists an agnatic line of the Rumanian Hohenzollerns. King Karol II had a morganatic son (Karol Hohenzollern-Lambrino) from his annulled marriage to Zizi Lambrino. Zizi came from an aristocratic Rumanian family, some of whose ancestors may be traced back on Genealogics.org to the ancient Voivodes of Moldavia. Karol Hohenzollern-Lambrino had two sons (with different wives), Paul and Alexander. Paul married American socialite Lia Triff,  relocated to Rumania, and fourteen years later, in 2010, they had a son, Karol. Lia was about 60 years old when she gave birth, so there likely was some surrogacy/fertility-enhancement procedure involved. But as Paul appears to be the biological father, their son continues the agnatic line of Hohenzollerns of Rumania. Paul's younger half-brother Alexander evidently leads a quiet bachelor life in Colorado, employed at a ski-resort.


Postscript: Referring to Post #37 (House of Ascania) above: There seem to be two more extant lines of the Ascanian Dynasty traceable on Genealogics.org: The Grafen von Westarp, who have a 1790s morganatic descent from  the House of Anhalt-Bernburg-Hoym, and the Grafen von Waldersee, with a 1760s illegitimate descent from Anhalt-Dessau.

__________________
Dis Aliter Visum "Beware of martyrs and those who would die for their beliefs; for they frequently make many others die with them, often before them, sometimes instead of them."
Murtagon

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 237
Reply with quote  #49 
Thank you for the information, Windemere!

You can rest assured, I haven't forgotten about the House of Ascania at all!

The next one should be up on Friday, but it's not about Anhalt.

Off-topic: I was a bit worried about your lack of participation here. You seem fine, so that's good.
Murtagon

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 237
Reply with quote  #50 
Dynasty №10: House of Hesse (Part Three)

As I had once promised, we return to the House of Hesse. Its younger branch, the one situated in Darmstadt specifically, had a junior line that was both fortunate and unfortunate for different reasons.

George I, Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt (1547 - 1596), is the point of divergence, as the below line begins with his youngest son to reach adulthood.

I. House of Hesse-Homburg:
  1. Frederick I, Landgrave of Hesse-Homburg (1585 - 1638), father of...
  2. Louis Philippe of Hesse-Homburg (1623 - 1643), brother of...
  3. William Christoph, Landgrave of Hesse-Homburg (1625 - 1681), brother of...
  4. Frederick II, Landgrave of Hesse-Homburg (1633 - 1708), father of...
  5. Frederick III, Landgrave of Hesse-Homburg (1673 - 1746), uncle of...
  6. Frederick IV, Landgrave of Hesse-Homburg (1724 - 1751), father of...
  7. Frederick V, Landgrave of Hesse-Homburg (1748 - 1820), father of...
  8. Frederick VI, Landgrave of Hesse-Homburg (1769 - 1829), brother of...
  9. Louis William, Landgrave of Hesse-Homburg (1770 - 1839), brother of...
  10. Philip, Landgrave of Hesse-Homburg (1779 - 1846), brother of...
  11. Gustav, Landgrave of Hesse-Homburg (1781 - 1848), brother of...
  12. Ferdinand, Landgrave of Hesse-Homburg (1783 - 1866).
Yes, Landgrave Friedrich the Fifth was succeeded by no less than five of his sons. While his receiving of independence in 1815 was a generally positive thing (it seems an exception was made, as his progeny had fought bravely in the wars), them not having male children of their own, dying after them or just not marrying at all, meant that the last dynast died in 1866 and the House went extinct. What happened then may have been not surpising at the time, but today would certainly spark a lot of protests.

The Landgraviate of Hesse-Homburg became part of the Grand Duchy of Hesse and by Rhine. Not for long, though, as it took the "wrong" side during the war between Austria and Prussia for German domination and quickly lost those territories in favour of the victor.

I believe that the last five Landgraves actually made a record, as I don't think that a European ruler had been followed by so many of his/her children before... legitimately, at least. 

P.S. Peter, would you please add this branch to the others? Thank you!
Murtagon

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 237
Reply with quote  #51 
Dynasty №18: House of Schwarzburg

The next family to be showcased by me is Schwarzburg, which is yet another old German family. Or rather, was...
Günther I (died in 1109) may have been the progenitor. It is with his agnatic descendant, Günther XL, Count of Schwarzburg (1499 - 1552), that the descents below begin.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Günther XL was the father of John Günther I, Count of Schwarzburg-Sondershausen (1532 - 1586). As is by now customary, the starting point is the first Prince (since 1697).

I. House of Schwarzburg-Sondershausen:
  1. Christian William I, Prince of Schwarzburg-Sondershausen (1647 - 1721), father of...
  2. Günther XLIII, Prince of Schwarzburg-Sondershausen (1678 - 1740), half-brother of...
  3. Henry XXXV, Prince of Schwarzburg-Sondershausen (1689 - 1758), uncle of...
  4. Christian Günther III, Prince of Schwarzburg-Sondershausen (1736 - 1794), father of...
  5. Günther Frederick Charles I, Prince of Schwarzburg-Sondershausen (1760 - 1837), father of...
  6. Günther Friedrich Karl II, Prince of Schwarzburg-Sondershausen (1801 - 1889), father of...
  7. Charles Gonthier, Prince of Schwarzburg-Sondershausen (1830 - 1909).
I-7 was the last male of his line. In 1909, his Principality entered into a personal union with the only other remaining one (see below).
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Günther XL was also the father of Albrecht VII, Count of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt (1537 - 1605). Again, the descent begins with the first Prince of the line (promoted in 1697 and 1710).

I. House of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt:
  1. Albert Anton, Prince of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt (1641 - 1710), father of...
  2. Louis Frederick I, Prince of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt (1667 - 1718), father of...
  3. Frederick Anton, Prince of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt (1692 - 1744), father of...
  4. John Frederick, Prince of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt (1721 - 1767), nephew of...
  5. Louis Günther II, Prince of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt (1708 - 1790), father of...
  6. Frederick Charles, Prince of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt (1736 - 1793), father of...
  7. Louis Frederick II, Prince of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt (1767 - 1807), father of...
  8. Friedrich Günther, Prince of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt (1793 - 1867), father of...
  9. Sizzo, Prince of Schwarzburg (1860 - 1926), father of...
  10. Friedrich Günther, Prince of Schwarzburg (1901 - 1971).
Of course, the marriage of I-8 which produced I-9 was morganatic. This meant that the actual succession in 1867 went this way:
  1. Friedrich Günther, Prince of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt (1793 - 1867), brother of...
  2. Albert, Prince of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt (1798 - 1869), father of...
  3. George Albert, Prince of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt (1838 - 1890), second cousin of...
II. House of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt (Junior branch) [Descended from Frederick Charles, Prince of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt, through his son, Karl, Prinz von Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt]:
  1. Günther Victor, Prince of Schwarzburg (1852 - 1925).
I-9 was demorganatized in 1896, which meant that he became a claimant for both thrones, as they were abolished following Germany's loss in WWI in late 1918. Unfortunately, his own son failed to produce a male heir, which meant that the House of Schwarzburg went extinct thirteen years later with the death of the elder sister of I-10, Princess Marie Antoinette of Schwarzburg (1898 - 1984). It's possible that the claim went through her (semi-Salic succession).
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

As of the time of this writing, the House of Schwarzburg is the only one of those from the era of the German Empire to have gone extinct. Depending on the interpretation, the next one is probably going to be Ascania...

P.S. Peter, would you please add this House to the others? Thank you!
Murtagon

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 237
Reply with quote  #52 
Dynasty №14: House of Ascania (Part Two)

Let us now see the other two lines of this German House, both of which still existed in the post-Napoleonic era.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The first one begins with a younger son of Joachim Ernest, Prince of Anhalt (1536 - 1586).

I. House of Anhalt-Bernburg:
  1. Christian I, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg (1568 - 1630), father of...
  2. Christian II, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg (1599 - 1656), father of...
  3. Victor Amadeus, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg (1634 - 1718), father of...
  4. Karl Frederick, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg (1668 - 1721), father of...
  5. Victor Frederick, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg (1700 - 1765), father of...
  6. Frederick Albert, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg (1735 - 1796), father of...
  7. Alexius Frederick Christian, Duke of Anhalt-Bernburg (1767 - 1834), father of...
  8. Alexander Karl, Duke of Anhalt-Bernburg (1805 - 1863), fourth cousin twice removed of...

II. House of Westarp [Descended from Victor Amadeus, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg, through his son, Lebrecht, Prince of Anhalt-Zeitz-Hoym]:
  1. Adolf, Graf von Westarp (1851 - 1915), father of...
  2. Albrecht Berengar, Graf von Westarp (1886 - 1947), second cousin of...

III. House of Westarp (Second branch) [Descended from Count Louis Frederick Victor of Westarp through his son, Karl Viktor Franz, Graf von Westarp]:
  1. Graf Friedrich Franz von Westarp (1897 - 1981), first cousin of...

IV. House of Westarp (Third branch) [Descended from Karl Viktor Franz, Graf von Westarp, through his son, Viktor, Graf von Westarp]:
  1. Graf Karl Joachim von Westarp (b. 1926).
The Westarp family appears to be the only legitimate branch of the House of Ascania (after the main one). It's not dynastic, however.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
II-A. House of Anhalt-Zeitz-Hoym:
  1. Lebrecht, Prince of Anhalt-Zeitz-Hoym (1669 - 1727), father of...
  2. Victor I, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym (1693 - 1772), father of...
  3. Charles Louis, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym (1723 - 1806), father of...
  4. Victor II, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym (1767 - 1812), first cousin once removed of...

II-B. House of Westarp [Descended from Victor I, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym, through his son, Prince Franz Adolph of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym]:
  1. Count Louis Frederick Victor of Westarp (1791 - 1850), father of...
  2. Adolf, Graf von Westarp (1822 - 1861), father of...
  3. Adolf, Graf von Westarp (1851 - 1915), same as II-1.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
IV-A. House of Westarp (Third branch):
  1. Viktor, Graf von Westarp (1868 - 1947), father of...
  2. Graf Friedrich von Westarp (1923 - 1954), brother of...
  3. Graf Karl Joachim von Westarp (b. 1926), same as IV-1.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The other one begins with a grandson of an even younger son of Joachim Ernest, Prince of Anhalt (1536 - 1586).

I. House of Anhalt-Köthen:
  1. Emmanuel, Prince of Anhalt-Köthen (1631 - 1670), father of...
  2. Emmanuel Lebrecht, Prince of Anhalt-Köthen (1671 - 1704), father of...
  3. Leopold, Prince of Anhalt-Köthen (1694 - 1728), brother of...
  4. Augustus Louis, Prince of Anhalt-Köthen (1697 - 1755), father of...
  5. Karl George Lebrecht, Prince of Anhalt-Köthen (1730 - 1789), father of...
  6. Augustus Christian Frederick, Duke of Anhalt-Köthen (1769 - 1812), uncle of...
  7. Louis Augustus Karl Frederick Emil, Duke of Anhalt-Köthen (1802 - 1818), first cousin once removed of...

II. House of Anhalt-Köthen (Second branch) [Descended from Augustus Louis, Prince of Anhalt-Köthen, through his son, Frederick Erdmann, Prince of Anhalt-Pless]:
  1. Frederick Ferdinand, Duke of Anhalt-Köthen (1769 - 1830), brother of...
  2. Henry, Duke of Anhalt-Köthen (1778 - 1847).

As one can see, both lines went extinct shortly before the demise of the German Confederation in 1866. As one could expect, their territories were inherited by the main line.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
II-A. House of Anhalt-Pless:
  1. Frederick Erdmann, Prince of Anhalt-Pless (1731 - 1797), father of...
  2. Emmanuel Ernest Erdmann, Hereditary Prince of Anhalt-Pless (1768 - 1808), brother of...
  3. Frederick Ferdinand, Duke of Anhalt-Köthen (1769 - 1830), same as II-1.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

As has been noted above, the main line of the House of Ascania managed to unite the whole Duchy in 1863. There are almost no agnates anymore and the current Duke has changed the method of succession to absolute primogeniture. There can be little doubt that this would not have been done in, say, 1918. Who knows what they would have done instead, though...

P.S. Peter, would you please add these lines to the others? Thanks in advance!
Murtagon

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 237
Reply with quote  #53 
Dynasty №19: House of Waldeck

Agnatic descendants of Widekind I, Count of Schwalenberg (c. 1080 - c. 1136), this dynasty is the last that reigned during the era of the German Empire (1871 - 1918).

Surprisingly, there was only one ruling line during that time. As usual, the below descent begins with the very first Prince, who received that title in 1712.

I. House of Waldeck:
  1. Friedrich Anton Ulrich, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont (1676 - 1728), father of...
  2. Prince Christian of Waldeck and Pyrmont (1701 - 1728), brother of...
  3. Karl August, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont (1704 - 1763), father of...
  4. Friedrich Karl August, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont (1743 - 1812), brother of...
  5. George I, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont (1747 - 1813), father of...
  6. George II, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont (1789 - 1845), father of...
  7. George Victor, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont (1831 - 1893), father of...
  8. Friedrich, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont (1865 - 1946), father of...
  9. Josias, Hereditary Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont (1896 - 1967), father of...
  10. Wittekind, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont (b. 1936).
Unfortunately, the Principality of Waldeck and Pyrmont was abolished in late 1918.

P.S. Peter, would you please add this House to the rest? Thank you!
Murtagon

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 237
Reply with quote  #54 
Dynasty №5: House of Wettin (Part Four)

As I've said before, the House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha is one day expected to be the only branch of Wettin left. Let me review its three main lines, all of which descend from the sons of Francis, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld (1750 - 1806).

The senior line has his eldest son and successor, Ernest I, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (1784 - 1844), as progenitor. I have explained before that Saxe-Coburg gave Saalfeld to Saxe-Meiningen in 1826, so that it could receive Gotha in return, as the House of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg had recently gone extinct in male line.
This branch has two sub-branches of its own, with their common male ancestor being Ernest the First's younger son, Albert, Prince Consort (1819 - 1861), who had been married to Queen Victoria (1819 - 1901). The senior one descends from their eldest son, Edward VII (1841 - 1910), and is nowadays (since 1917, to be exact) referred to as "House of Windsor". The junior one descends from Albert and Victoria's youngest son, Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany (1853 - 1884). This is the actual Ducal line. 

The middle line was formed by the agnatic descendants of Prince Ferdinand of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (1785 - 1851). Due to his marriage to Princess Maria Antonia Koháry (1797 - 1862), his branch is often called Saxe-Coburg and Gotha-Koháry. They were Catholic... and extremely wealthy. Anyway, their eldest son, Ferdinand II of Portugal (1816 - 1885) was the second husband of Maria II of Portugal (1819 - 1853) and this made him King jure uxoris from 1837 (when she gave birth to a child) to 1853 (when she died). Their male line ended with the death of their great-grandson, Manuel II of Portugal (1889 - 1932). Despite Portugal having abolished its monarchy in 1910, there was a pretender to the throne, but he was from the House of Braganza (agnatically, that is).
As Prince Ferdinand's eldest son and his line were unavailable, the Headship of this branch went to a younger son, Prince August of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (1818 - 1881). Long story short, this German branch practically went extinct with the death of Prince Johannes Heinrich of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (1931 - 2010), with which the succession went to the Bulgarian branch.
A younger son of Prince August was elected Prince of Bulgaria in 1887. This man was Ferdinand I of Bulgaria (1861 - 1948). When Bulgaria became fully independent from the Ottoman Empire in late 1908, he assumed the title "Tsar (King) of the Bulgarians". Unfortunately, Ferdinand had to abdicate the throne due to Bulgaria's loss in the First World War in 1918. He was succeeded by his elder son, Boris III of Bulgaria (1894 - 1943), who died in unclear circumstances following a visit to Adolf Hitler in the German Reich and was himself succeeded by his only son, Simeon II (b. 1937). The Bulgarian monarchy was abolished shortly after the Second World War's end (1946) and the young ruler was sent into exile, from which he returned in 1996. He became Prime Minister five years later (His Majesty was not allowed to run for President) under the name of Simeon Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (Симеон Сакскобургготски, Simeon Sakskoburggotski). It's worth noting that he has never actually abdicated the throne.

The junior line began with the youngest surviving son, who was elected King of the Belgians in 1831, shortly after the country's independence from the Netherlands.

I. House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (Belgian branch):
  1. Leopold I of Belgium (1790 - 1865), father of...
  2. Leopold II of Belgium (1835 - 1909), uncle of...
  3. Albert I of Belgium (1875 - 1934), father of...
  4. Leopold III of Belgium (1901 - 1983), father of...
  5. Baudouin of Belgium (1930 - 1993), brother of...
  6. Albert II of Belgium (b. 1934).
King Leopold III abdicated in 1951 to save the monarchy. His younger son, King Albert II, abdicated in 2013, apparently due to health reasons. The current monarch is his eldest child, Philippe of Belgium (b. 1960).

Unfortunately, it is one day expected that the House of Wettin will no longer provide monarchs. Apart from a recent lack of dynastic marriages, there is the introduction of absolute primogeniture in Belgium in 1991. As the present King's eldest child is a daughter, well... it may be time to say "Auf Wiedersehen!"...

However, if all of these genealogical excursions have taught me anything, it is that nothing should be taken for "immutable". Wait and see...

P.S. Peter, would you please add this line (or lines, rather) to the others? Thank you!
Windemere

Registered:
Posts: 462
Reply with quote  #55 
Thank you, Murtagon, for that survey of the House of Saxe-Coburg & Gotha, and also the middle Kohary branch. Although the German branch of that family went dynastically extinct with the death of Prinz Johannes Heinrich in 2010, I think that, as well as the Bulgarian branch, there might  still be  extant a morganatic branch of that family. Philipp (1901-1985),  a son of Prinz August (1867-1922), married a commoner, Sarah Halasz. According to Wikipedia and Genealogics, they had a son. Philipp (1944-2014) who in turn had two sons, Maximilian (b. 1972) and Alexander (1978).  They'd probably share the Kohary legacy with the Bulgarian branch.
__________________
Dis Aliter Visum "Beware of martyrs and those who would die for their beliefs; for they frequently make many others die with them, often before them, sometimes instead of them."
Murtagon

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 237
Reply with quote  #56 
You're welcome, Windemere! I'm glad you liked it!

Yes, there are males who are genealogically senior to the Bulgarian Royal Family from the middle branch, but (as you note) they are not considered dynasts. That's why I glossed over them.

In my opinion, Tsar Simeon II also contracted a non-dynastic marriage* in 1962, so it would make sense for him to have relinquished the Headship of the branch soon after gaining it. I think it was Peter who said that there was some logic in the Kohary branch starting with a woman and eventually continuing through a woman (Simeon's elder sister), but I'm not sure why her heirs should be the children from her second and morganatic marriage. Maybe so that they would have something like a title too?


* Some (Bulgarian) people on social media do not agree with me on that point. Incidentally, they also continue to regurgitate the idea that Simeon II may be succeeded as pretender by whomever he wants. To be honest, His Majesty is also a bit to blame here, as he has actually said that in interviews (i.e., if the Prince of Tarnovo doesn't want the throne, then it could be someone else). That must be how you unite your followers... [rolleyes]
Peter

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 7,547
Reply with quote  #57 
I think this might be the post you have in mind, and actually it was not by me but by Windemere himself. I didn't think I would have said anything like that (not that Windemere was being unreasonable, it's just not the sort of thing I would come up with), but since years ago I was paralytic half the time when posting here you never know!

I'm OK with Simeon II's marriage being dynastic. He's the one who decides such things and evidently felt it was. I wouldn't be though with the succession being arbitrarily shifted about, wasn't aware of anything like that being mooted and I trust it will be unmooted pronto.
Murtagon

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 237
Reply with quote  #58 
Dynasty №20: House of Liechtenstein

Named after Liechtenstein Castle in modern-day Austria, this family originated with Hugo von Weikersdorf (d. 1156), whose agnatic descendants were raised to the Princely dignity in 1608, starting with Karl I, Prince of Liechtenstein (1569 - 1627). His male line issue went extinct with the death of his grandson, Hans-Adam I, Prince of Liechtenstein (1662 - 1712).

It was during the reign of the latter's second cousin, Anton Florian, Prince of Liechtenstein (1656 - 1721), that Liechtenstein was actually formed as a Principality, which had Imperial immediacy (it was a direct subject of the Holy Roman Emperor himself). His own male line ended with his grandson, Johann Nepomuk Karl, Prince of Liechtenstein (1724 - 1748). 

The young prince was succeeded by his father's first cousin, Joseph Wenzel I, Prince of Liechtenstein (1696 - 1772). As all of his children (three sons included) died in childhood, this meant that his own line had also failed. Fortunately, he had a nephew, who followed him on the throne.

I. House of Liechtenstein:
  1. Franz Joseph I, Prince of Liechtenstein (1726 - 1781), father of...
  2. Aloys I, Prince of Liechtenstein (1759 - 1805), brother of...
  3. Johann I Joseph, Prince of Liechtenstein (1760 - 1836), father of...
  4. Aloys II, Prince of Liechtenstein (1796 - 1858), father of...
  5. Johann II, Prince of Liechtenstein (1840 - 1929), brother of...
  6. Franz I, Prince of Liechtenstein (1853 - 1938), first cousin once removed of...

II. House of Liechtenstein (Junior branch) [Descended from Johann I Joseph, Prince of Liechtenstein, through his son, Prince Franz de Paula of Liechtenstein]:
  1. Prince Aloys of Liechtenstein (1869 - 1955), father of...
  2. Franz Joseph II, Prince of Liechtenstein (1906 - 1989), father of...
  3. Hans-Adam II, Prince of Liechtenstein (b. 1945).
Prince Aloys renounced his rights in 1923, which is why his son directly succeeded Franz I.
As it happens, this is the last European monarchy to practice agnatic primogeniture. Quite fitting, as it is a remnant of the Holy Roman Empire.
In addition, the Principality has been considered a sovereign state since 1806. It was a member of the German Confederation (1815 - 1866), but was not in the German Empire (1871 - 1918). This may be why it's still with us.
Incidentally, it is one day expected that the Prince of Liechtenstein is going to be the same person as the Jacobite King of England, Scotland, France and Ireland.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
II-A. House of Liechtenstein (Junior branch):
  1. Prince Franz de Paula of Liechtenstein (1802 - 1887), father of...
  2. Prince Alfred of Liechtenstein (1842 - 1907), father of...
  3. Prince Franz de Paula Maria of Liechtenstein (1868 - 1929), brother of...
  4. Prince Aloys of Liechtenstein (1869 - 1955), same as II-1.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

An interesting tradition appears to be forming in Liechtenstein. Franz I appointed his successor as regent in 1938 (shortly before his own death). Franz Joseph II appointed his own successor as regent in 1984 (five years before his death). Hans-Adam II appointed his own successor (hopefully) as regent in 2004. This means that Alois, Hereditary Prince of Liechtenstein (b. 1968), is the actual person who reigns in the tiny Principality.

P.S. Peter, would you please add this House to the others? Thank you very much!
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.