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Murtagon

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Reply with quote  #61 
Heir №14: Duchess Donata of Mecklenburg (b. 1956)

One of the last remaining members of the House of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, this woman is the cognatic heir of at least two lines. Let us see.


I. Grand Duchy of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (genealogical representation only):

  1. Frederick Francis I, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (1756 - 1837), grandfather of...
  2. Paul Frederick, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (1800 - 1842), father of...
  3. Frederick Francis II, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (1823 - 1883), father of...
  4. Frederick Francis III, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (1851 - 1897), father of...
  5. Frederick Francis IV, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (1882 - 1945), father of...
  6. Friedrich Franz, Hereditary Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (1910 - 2001), uncle of...
  7. Duchess Donata of Mecklenburg (b. 1956).


II. Duchy of Saxe-Altenburg (genealogical representation only):

  1. Ernst II, Duke of Saxe-Altenburg (1871 - 1955), father of...
  2. Georg Moritz, Hereditary Prince of Saxe-Altenburg (1900 - 1991), uncle of...
  3. Prince Alfred of Prussia (1924 - 2013), uncle of...
  4. Duchess Donata of Mecklenburg (b. 1956), same as I-7.

Wikipedia also notes that Duchess Donata is also the heir-general of Gorm the Old, a semi-legendary Danish ruler. I have been unable to verify that claim.

However, I am pretty sure that there is at least one other certain one. I vaguely remember that it passed through Ivan VI of Russia and his unfortunate siblings and then to the Mecklenburg-Schwerin line. Any help here?

Now that there are no more males from Mecklenburg-Schwerin, it is widely considered that the de jure Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz has united the two titles and "realms".

Saxe-Altenburg is a different case. When Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg went extinct in the mid-1820s, there was an Ernestine ducal shuffle:
1. Saxe-Meiningen received Hildburghausen (from 2.) and Saalfeld (from 3.);
2. Saxe-Hildburghausen gave up that city and became Saxe-Altenburg;
3. Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld gave up the latter city and became Saxe-Coburg and Gotha.

In this case, it appears that the Prince of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach now holds the representation (agnatically, sort of) for Saxe-Altenburg, perhaps as a compromise.

Now, as I am nearing the end of the credible heirs-general, I have a special offer for you:

Who would you like to see next? 

Until next time...

P.S. Peter, would you be kind and add this heiress to the list? Thanks in advance!
Windemere

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Reply with quote  #62 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Murtagon
Heir №13: Karl Friedrich, Prince of Hohenzollern (b. 1952)

While undisputedly the Head of the Swabian branch of the House of Hohenzollern, Karl Friedrich may also be the Head of the entire House. Good arguments could be put forward for both him and his distant agnatic cousin, Georg Friedrich, Prince of Prussia. Fortunately, this is irrelevant for this thread.

Let us see what His Highness has got to offer.


I. Kingdom of the Two Sicilies (genealogical representation only):

  1. Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies (1751 - 1825), father of...
  2. Francis I of the Two Sicilies (1777 - 1830), father of...
  3. Ferdinand II of the Two Sicilies (1810 - 1859), father of...
  4. Francis II of the Two Sicilies (1836 - 1894), half-uncle of...
  5. Princess Maria Teresa of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (1867 - 1909), mother of...
  6. Frederick, Prince of Hohenzollern (1891 - 1965), father of...
  7. Friedrich Wilhelm, Prince of Hohenzollern (1924 - 2010), father of...
  8. Karl Friedrich, Prince of Hohenzollern (b. 1952).


II. Grand Duchy of Baden (genealogical representation only):

  1. Charles Frederick, Grand Duke of Baden (1728 - 1811), grandfather of...
  2. Charles, Grand Duke of Baden (1786 - 1818), father of...
  3. Princess Louise Amelie of Baden (1811 - 1854), mother of...
  4. Carola of Vasa (1833 - 1907), first cousin once removed of...
  5. William, Prince of Hohenzollern (1864 - 1927), father of...
  6. Frederick, Prince of Hohenzollern (1891 - 1965), same as I-6.

III. County of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen/Principality of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (also heir-male):


  1. Charles II, Count of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (1547 - 1606), father of...
  2. Johann, Prince of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (1578 - 1638), father of...
  3. Meinrad I, Prince of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (1605 - 1681), father of...
  4. Maximilian I, Prince of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (1636 - 1689), father of...
  5. Meinrad II, Prince of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (1673 - 1715), father of...
  6. Joseph Friedrich Ernst, Prince of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (1702 - 1769), father of...
  7. Karl Friedrich, Prince of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (1724 - 1785), father of...
  8. Anton Aloys, Prince of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (1762 - 1831), father of...
  9. Karl, Prince of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (1785 - 1853), father of...
  10. Karl Anton, Prince of Hohenzollern (1811 - 1885), father of...
  11. Leopold, Prince of Hohenzollern (1835 - 1905), father of...
  12. William, Prince of Hohenzollern (1864 - 1927), same as II-5.


The Kingdom of the Two Sicilies was so named, because it consisted of the island of Sicily and the southern part of the Apennine Peninsula (also known as the Kingdom of Naples; it was formally referred to as the Kingdom of Sicily, as well). There are two current pretenders: the Dukes of Calabria and Castro. 

Again due to agnatic primogeniture, the pretender for Baden is Maximilian, Margrave of Baden. Incredibly, however, Karl Friedrich is also the heir-general for the entire line of Princes of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen. By my count, that's 15 generations!

P.S. Peter, could you please add this heir to the list in the first post? Thank you in advance!



Thank you for posting these interesting male-preference lineages for Prinz Karl Friedrich of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen.

Carola of Vasa (#4 in the male-preference Grand Duchy of Baden lineage) was the granddaughter of deposed Swedish King Gustaf IV. (Gustaf IV had several grandchildren through his daughters, some of whose descendants are, I believe,  listed in your Princes  of  Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen lineage, but Carola was his only surviving grandchild through his son). I read somewhere years ago that, for some traditionally-minded Swedes unhappy with the elevation of Jean Bernadotte to the Swedish monarchy, Carola was considered the de jure queen of Sweden. According to her Wikipedia biography, Carola suffered 10 miscarriages during her time as Queen-Consort of Saxony. I believe that she was the last of the Swedish Holstein-Gottorps.

Interestingly, a male preference lineage from deposed King Gustaf IV leads to the present King of Sweden:

King Gustaf IV, father of:
Grand Duchess Sophie of Baden, mother of:
Grand Duke Friedrich of Baden, father of:
Queen Victoria of Sweden, mother of:
King Gustaf VI of Sweden, father of:
Prince Gustaf of Sweden, father of:
King Carl XVI of Sweden

Postscript: Murtagon,  upon just now doing some further checking, I see that this line I've just posted from King Gustaf IV to King Carl XVI  is basically a duplication of the line you'd posted several weeks ago in this thread  for the King of Sweden, and you'd already mentioned the connection between them in that post. Sorry for the redundancy.

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Murtagon

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Reply with quote  #63 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Windemere



Thank you for posting these interesting male-preference lineages for Prinz Karl Friedrich of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen.

Carola of Vasa (#4 in the male-preference Grand Duchy of Baden lineage) was the granddaughter of deposed Swedish King Gustaf IV. (Gustaf IV had several grandchildren through his daughters, some of whose descendants are, I believe,  listed in your Princes  of  Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen lineage, but Carola was his only surviving grandchild through his son). I read somewhere years ago that, for some traditionally-minded Swedes unhappy with the elevation of Jean Bernadotte to the Swedish monarchy, Carola was considered the de jure queen of Sweden. According to her Wikipedia biography, Carola suffered 10 miscarriages during her time as Queen-Consort of Saxony. I believe that she was the last of the Swedish Holstein-Gottorps.

Interestingly, a male preference lineage from deposed King Gustaf IV leads to the present King of Sweden:

King Gustaf IV, father of:
Grand Duchess Sophie of Baden, mother of:
Grand Duke Friedrich of Baden, father of:
Queen Victoria of Sweden, mother of:
King Gustaf VI of Sweden, father of:
Prince Gustaf of Sweden, father of:
King Carl XVI of Sweden

Postscript: Murtagon,  upon just now doing some further checking, I see that this line I've just posted from King Gustaf IV to King Carl XVI  is basically a duplication of the line you'd posted several weeks ago in this thread  for the King of Sweden, and you'd already mentioned the connection between them in that post. Sorry for the redundancy.


No problem! It's good to see further interest in that field of genealogy.

Yes, Queen Carola of Saxony was the last male-line descendant of Adolf Frederick, who was King of Sweden from 1751 to 1771. The current King is his senior heir through male-preference primogeniture, as has been noted.
Murtagon

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Reply with quote  #64 
Heir №15: Prince Alexander of Wied (b. 1960)


The elder son of Friedrich Wilhelm, Prince of Wied (1931-2000), Prince Alexander has renounced his dynastic rights and so is not considered to be the current Head of the House of Wied.

He does, however, hold at least two prominent genealogical representations. Here they are.


I. Kingdom of Württemberg (genealogical representation only):

  1. Frederick I of Württemberg (1754 - 1816), father of...
  2. William I of Württemberg (1781 - 1864), father of...
  3. Charles I of Württemberg (1823 - 1891), brother of...
  4. Princess Catherine of Württemberg (1821 - 1898), mother of...
  5. William II of Württemberg (1848 - 1921), father of...
  6. Princess Pauline of Württemberg (1877 - 1965), grandmother of...
  7. Friedrich Wilhelm, Prince of Wied (1931 - 2000), father of...
  8. Prince Alexander of Wied (b. 1960).


II. Duchy of Brunswick (genealogical representation only):

  1. Ferdinand Albert II, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (1680 - 1735), father of...
  2. Charles I, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (1713 - 1780), father of...
  3. Charles William Ferdinand, Duke of Brunswick (1735 - 1806), father of...
  4. Georg Wilhelm Christian of Brunswick (1769 - 1811), brother of...
  5. August of Brunswick (1770 - 1822), uncle of...
  6. Charles II, Duke of Brunswick (1804 - 1873), brother of...
  7. William, Duke of Brunswick (1806 - 1884), first cousin once removed of...
  8. Charles I of Württemberg (1823 - 1891), same as I-3.

Both of these may need some elaboration.

Württemberg was a regular Duchy in the Holy Roman Empire until 1806, when thanks to Napoleon Bonaparte it was raised to a Kingdom (it had briefly been an Electorate). When King Charles I died childless in 1891, he was succeeded by his nephew (sister's son), who was also more importantly his agnatic cousin. The latter, King William II, died without a living legitimate son in 1921, so the representations diverged. The current pretender since 1975 has been Carl, Duke of Württemberg.

When Duke Charles William Ferdinand of Brunswick died in 1806, he was succeeded by his youngest son, Frederick William (ruled from 1806 to 1815), as he was apparently the most normal of them all. In any case, the current pretender here is Ernst August, Prince of Hanover, a male-line descendant of King George III of the United Kingdom.

So, I think this is going to be it, for the time being at least. Fifteen heirs - if anyone had told me that I would find so many suitable people with some really fascinating ancestries, I would have branded them a liar! [smile]

I would like to thank Peter, Windemere, Queenslander and all other readers from the "silent majority"!

P.S. Peter, could you please put this nobleman in his rightful place among the other heirs? Thanks again! 😉


Peter

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Reply with quote  #65 
Prince Alexander is also heir to the short-lived Albanian principality established just before WWI, by both male and male preference primogeniture. Or would be, but for his renunciation. Anyway, virtually no one supports the Wied line over that of Zogu. There is though a further and very little-known distinction Prince Alexander has. When absolute primogeniture first began to be mooted for Britain, lots of newspapers seized on the fact that Friederike von der Osten (elder sister of Hubertus of this parish), a descendant of the Kaiser -- pause here for horrified gasps -- would be Queen if the law had applied in Queen Victoria's reign. This was the most recent case where absolute primogeniture would have made a difference, but still did not seem a reasonable break point to me. So I went back to the Acts of Settlement and Union, the last prior change in succession law, and forward again from them. Guess who comes out of the hat? Prince Alexander, of course.

I hope there will be more on the thread in due course, but in any case want to record how much I've appreciated and enjoyed your efforts, and thank you once again for bringing some life back to the section.
Murtagon

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Reply with quote  #66 
Yes, of course, there will be, as long as I am alive and well! You are welcome!

As for Prince Alexander, when I saw what you had written, I remembered that he could have been King of the UK, if George III had died as a child or something. That's because he's the heir of Princess Augusta, elder sister of the aforementioned King. An interesting case of "What Could Have Been", even if rather contrived.

I would have mentioned Albania, if it hadn't been for the fact that I don't cover this kind of descents. I mean Prince Vidi's line went extinct with his son's death, so there is no descent from him.

Now that I've said that, let's have a look at a couple of monarchs who do not have surviving (legitimate) descent today:

1) King Otto of Greece (l. 1815 - 1867) did not have children. Two possibilities here: Ludwig II of Bavaria (l. 1845 - 1886), his nephew, OR Luitpold, Prince Regent of Bavaria (l. 1821 - 1912), his brother. Of course, the two lines converged in 1916. The current heir would be the Duke of Bavaria.

2) Prince Alexander of Bulgaria (l. 1857 - 1893) had (morganatically) a son and a daughter. He was succeeded by the former (Assen von Hartenau), who died childless in 1965. I see two possibilities here:
   A) Assen was succeeded by his first cousin once removed - David Mountbatten, 3rd Marquess of Milford Haven (1919 - 1970), whose heir at the moment is his elder son, George Mountbatten, 4th Marquess of Milford Haven (b. 1961).
   B) Assen was succeeded by his first cousin once removed - Lady Iris Mountbatten (1920 - 1982), who was herself succeeded by her first cousin once removed, Alfonso, Duke of Cádiz (1936 - 1989), whose heir is Luis Alfonso (b. 1974).

3) Prince Wilhelm/Wied of Albania (l. 1876 - 1945) had a daughter and a son. He was succeeded by the latter (Carol Victor, Hereditary Prince of Albania), who died childless in 1973. I also see two possibilities here:
   A) Carol Victor was succeeded by his first cousin once removed - Friedrich Wilhelm, Prince of Wied (1931 - 2000), whose heir is Prince Alexander of Wied (b. 1960).
   B) Carol Victor was succeeded by his first cousin - Marie Elisabeth of Wied (1913 - 1985), who was followed by her niece, Victoria, Baroness of Schlotheim (b. 1948).

Oh, I just can't catch a break, can I? [wink]
  
DC

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Reply with quote  #67 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Murtagon

2) Prince Alexander of Bulgaria (l. 1857 - 1893) had (morganatically) a son and a daughter. He was succeeded by the former (Assen von Hartenau), who died childless in 1965. I see two possibilities here:
   A) Assen was succeeded by his first cousin once removed - David Mountbatten, 3rd Marquess of Milford Haven (1919 - 1970), whose heir at the moment is his elder son, George Mountbatten, 4th Marquess of Milford Haven (b. 1961).
   B) Assen was succeeded by his first cousin once removed - Lady Iris Mountbatten (1920 - 1982), who was herself succeeded by her first cousin once removed, Alfonso, Duke of Cádiz (1936 - 1989), whose heir is Luis Alfonso (b. 1974).


Until 1902 when the Kassel line was granted the right of succession, Hesse and By Rhine was to pass to the female line in the event of the extinction of the male line.

I might be wrong here but I believe if this change had not happened after the death of the last Hesse and By Rhine male dynast, Prince Ludwig, in 1968, David Mountbatten (ironically a male line descendant of Hesse and By Rhine although via a morganatic marriage) would of been the genealogical heir to that claim based on male primogeniture as a descendant of Princess Victoria the eldest sister of Prince Ludwig's father. 

Although because the Battenberg/Mountbatten's are of morganatic descent so likely to have been excluded, probably the heir today would be your Heir No. 14 above, Duchess Donata of Mecklenburg as a descendant of the next sister who left descendants.

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Murtagon

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Reply with quote  #68 
Yes, the Marquess of Milford Haven is officially the genealogical "Head" of the House of Hesse-Darmstadt. I say "officially" because it's widely assumed that the paternal grandfather of Prince Alexander of Bulgaria was most definitely not someone who had ever held the title of Grand Duke. It must have been very convenient then, that Prince Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine married morganatically. Of course, due to that morganatic marriage, the Marquess of Milford is only the heir-general of the last Grand Duke of Hesse and by Rhine. How ironic.

Having checked your last statement, Duchess Donata could have had a good claim to that, as well. Ah, royal intermarriage...
Murtagon

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Reply with quote  #69 
Heir №16: Vittorio Emanuele, Prince of Naples (b. 1937)

He is the only son of Umberto II of Italy and Marie-José of Belgium. Since 1983, the Prince of Naples has been considered by some monarchists to be the Head of the House of Savoy, as well as the de jure King of Italy.

Below you will find two relatively minor ducal representations that are held by this particular heir.

I. Duchy of Courland:
  1. Charles of Saxony, Duke of Courland (1733 - 1796), father of...
  2. Princess Maria Christina of Saxony (1770–1851), grandmother of...
  3. Victor Emmanuel II of Italy (1820 - 1878), father of...
  4. Umberto I of Italy (1844 - 1900), father of...
  5. Victor Emmanuel III of Italy (1869 - 1947), father of...
  6. Umberto II of Italy (1904 - 1983), father of...
  7. Vittorio Emanuele, Prince of Naples (b. 1937).

II. Duchy of Bouillon:
  1. Robert I de La Marck (1430 - 1487), father of...
  2. Robert II de la Marck (1468 - 1536), father of...
  3. Robert III de La Marck (1491 - 1537), father of...
  4. Robert IV de La Marck (1512 - 1556), father of...
  5. Henri Robert de La Marck (1540 - 1574), father of...
  6. Guillaume Robert de La Marck (1562 - 1588), brother of...
  7. Charlotte de La Marck (1574 - 1594), niece of...
  8. Charles Robert de La Marck (1541 - 1622), father of...
  9. Henri Robert de La Marck (1575 - 1652), father of...
  10. Louise de La Marck (1612 - 1668), mother of...
  11. Henri-Robert II Eschalard (? - 1675), father of...
  12. Louise Madeleine Eschalard de La Marck (1659 - 1717), mother of...
  13. Jeanne Henriette de Durfort (1691 - 1750), mother of...
  14. Louis, Prince of Brionne (1725 - 1761), father of...
  15. Charles Eugene, Prince of Lambesc (1751 - 1825), granduncle of...
  16. Charles Albert of Sardinia (1798 - 1849), father of...
  17. Victor Emmanuel II of Italy (1820 - 1878), same as I-3.
The Duchy of Courland and Semigallia existed from 1561 to 1795. Being the heir-general of only one of its Dukes does not make for a convincing claim. The current pretender is considered to be Ernst-Johann Biron, Prince of Courland (b. 1940).

The Duchy of Bouillon also existed until about 1795, when it was annexed by the French Republic. I have shown the original line of the House of La Marck, which was replaced by the House of La Tour d'Auvergne following the death of II-7. I had discovered the descent through this post by Guy Stair Sainty (b. 1950).

As for Italy, the other pretender is Prince Amedeo, Duke of Aosta (b. 1943). 

P.S. Peter, would you please add this new heir to the list on the first page? Thank you in advance!
Murtagon

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Reply with quote  #70 
Heir №6: Hubertus von der Osten (b. 1964) [Part Three]


VI. Latin Empire of Constantinople:
  1. Baldwin II, Latin Emperor (1217 - 1273), father of...
  2. Philip I, Latin Emperor (1243 - 1283), father of...
  3. Catherine I, Latin Empress (1274 - 1307), mother of...
  4. John, Count of Chartres (1302 - 1308), brother of...
  5. Catherine of Valois–Courtenay (c. 1303 - 1346), mother of...
  6. Robert, Prince of Taranto (1319/26 - 1364), brother of...
  7. Philip II, Prince of Taranto (1329 - 1374), brother of...
  8. Margaret of Taranto (c. 1325 - 1380), mother of...
  9. James of Baux (c. 1354 - 1383), first cousin once removed of...
  10. John of Artois, Count of Eu (1321 - 1387), father of...
  11. Robert IV of Artois, Count of Eu (1356 - 1387), brother of...
  12. Philip of Artois, Count of Eu (1358 - 1397), father of...
  13. Philip of Artois (1393 - 1397), brother of...
  14. Charles of Artois, Count of Eu (1394 - 1472), uncle of...
  15. John II, Count of Nevers (1415 - 1491), grandfather of...
  16. John II, Duke of Cleves (1458 - 1521), father of...
  17. John III, Duke of Cleves (1490 - 1538/9), father of...
  18. William, Duke of Jülich-Cleves-Berg (1516 - 1592), father of...
  19. John William, Duke of Jülich-Cleves-Berg (1562 - 1609), uncle of...
  20. Duchess Anna of Prussia (1576 - 1625), same as I-3.

VII. Kingdom of Denmark (genealogical representation only):
  1. Frederick I of Denmark (1471 - 1533), father of...
  2. Christian III of Denmark (1503 - 1559), father of...
  3. Frederick II of Denmark (1534 - 1588), father of...
  4. Christian IV of Denmark (1577 - 1648), father of...
  5. Frederick III of Denmark (1609 - 1670), father of...
  6. Christian V of Denmark (1646 - 1699), father of...
  7. Frederick IV of Denmark (1671 - 1730), father of...
  8. Christian VI of Denmark (1699 - 1746), father of...
  9. Frederick V of Denmark (1723 - 1766), father of...
  10. Christian VII of Denmark (1749 - 1808), father of...
  11. Frederick VI of Denmark (1768 - 1839), father of...
  12. Princess Caroline of Denmark (1793 - 1881), sister of...
  13. Princess Vilhelmine Marie of Denmark (1808 - 1891), first cousin twice removed of...
  14. Ernst Gunther, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein (1863 - 1921), brother of...
  15. Augusta Victoria of Schleswig-Holstein (1858 - 1921), mother of...
  16. Wilhelm, German Crown Prince (1882 - 1951), same as I-15.
These are two additional genealogical representations for Hubertus von der Osten.

I've already shown that the heir-general of the very first Latin Emperor is (possibly) the current Duke of Calabria. The actual claim may reside today with the de jure Emperor of Austria.

The Kingdom of Denmark had an initially elective monarchy, which was changed by King Frederick III. The method was apparently semi-Salic succession, which is why King Frederick VI was followed by his agnatic first cousin, King Christian VIII.

It is widely known that King Christian VII was not the biological father of his daughter, Princess Louise Augusta of Denmark (1771 - 1843), as his wife was known for having an affair with Johann Friedrich Struensee (1737 - 1772), the royal physician and de facto regent. In that case, the "true" heir-general would be Donatus, Landgrave of Hesse (b. 1966) instead. Of course, the legitimate Queen Regnant of Denmark is currently Margrethe II.

P.S. Peter, would you please add the new representations to the list? Thank you!
Murtagon

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Reply with quote  #71 
Heir №17: Margrethe II of Denmark (b. 1940)

She is the eldest daughter of Frederick IX of Denmark and Ingrid of Sweden. Since 1972, Margrethe II has been Queen of Denmark, because the method of succession was changed to MPP in 1953.

As the current succession is regulated by absolute primogeniture (as of 2009), it is one day expected that her heir-general and the actual ruler of Denmark would be different people.

I. Kingdom of Denmark:
  1. Christian IX of Denmark (1818 - 1906), father of...
  2. Frederick VIII of Denmark (1843 - 1912), father of...
  3. Christian X of Denmark (1870 - 1947), father of...
  4. Frederick IX of Denmark (1899 - 1972), father of...
  5. Margrethe II of Denmark (b. 1940).

II. Kingdom of Sweden & Kingdom of Norway:
  1. Charles XIV John of Sweden (1763 - 1844), father of...
  2. Oscar I of Sweden (1799 - 1859), father of...
  3. Charles XV of Sweden (1826 - 1872), father of...
  4. Louise of Sweden (1851 - 1926), mother of...
  5. Christian X of Denmark (1870 - 1947), same as I-3.
Sweden employed agnatic primogeniture until 1980, when absolute primogeniture was adopted. The current King of Sweden (since 1973) is Carl XVI Gustaf, who is Heir №9.

Norway was in a personal union with Sweden until 1905, when a younger grandson of Christian IX of Denmark was elected King of Norway, namely Haakon VII. The incumbent is Harald V (since 1991).

P. S. Peter, could you please add Her Majesty to the list? Thank you!
Murtagon

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Reply with quote  #72 
Heir №18: Alexander, Crown Prince of Yugoslavia (b. 1945)

He is the last heir-apparent of the former Kingdom of Yugoslavia. Through his parents, Prince Alexander has inherited two claims to Serbia and one important genealogical descent from the most recent Kings of the Hellenes.

I. Principality of Serbia/Kingdom of Serbia:
  1. Karađorđe (1768 - 1817), father of...
  2. Alexis (1801 - 1830), father of...
  3. George (1827 - 1884), father of...
  4. Prince Alexis Karageorgevich (1859 - 1920), first cousin once removed of...
  5. Peter I of Serbia (1844 - 1921), father of...
  6. George, Crown Prince of Serbia (1887 - 1972), granduncle of...
  7. Alexander, Crown Prince of Yugoslavia (b. 1945).

II. Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes/Kingdom of Yugoslavia:
  1. Alexander I of Yugoslavia (1888 - 1934), father of...
  2. Peter II of Yugoslavia (1923 - 1970), father of...
  3. Alexander, Crown Prince of Yugoslavia (b. 1945), same as I-7.

III. Kingdom of Greece (genealogical representation only):
  1. George I of Greece (1845 - 1913), father of...
  2. Constantine I of Greece (1868 - 1923), father of...
  3. George II of Greece (1890 - 1947), uncle of...
  4. Alexandra of Yugoslavia (1921 - 1993), mother of...
  5. Alexander, Crown Prince of Yugoslavia (b. 1945), same as I-7.
Yugoslavia ceased being a monarchy in 1945; the state itself has not existed since 2002. For this reason, His Highness is considered to be the most serious claimant for the former Serbian throne.

The Kingdom of Greece employed agnatic primogeniture until 1952, when MPP was adopted. The Greek monarchy was abolished after two referendums (in 1973 and 1974). The last King of the Hellenes is Constantine II, son of King Paul and grandson of King Constantine I.

P.S. Peter, would you please add the new heir to the others? Thank you!
Murtagon

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Reply with quote  #73 
Heir №19: Margareta of Romania (b. 1949)

She is the eldest daughter of Michael I of Romania and Princess Anne of Bourbon-Parma. Following her father's death in 2017, she has been considered the primary claimant to the former Romanian throne.

I. Kingdom of Romania:
  1. Ferdinand I of Romania (1865 - 1927), father of...
  2. Carol II of Romania (1893 - 1953), father of...
  3. Michael I of Romania (1921 - 2017), father of...
  4. Margareta of Romania (b. 1949).
II. Duchy of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (genealogical representation only):
  1. Alfred, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (1844 - 1900), father of...
  2. Marie of Romania (1875 - 1938), mother of...
  3. Carol II of Romania (1893 - 1953), same as I-2.
The Romanian monarchy was abolished at the end of 1947. As King Michael was the last undisputed heir-male of his grandfather (Michael's elder half-brother, Carol Lambrino, was generally considered illegitimate), the last monarchical constitution of Romania specified that in such a case a descendant of the brothers of King Carol I of Romania (uncle of King Ferdinand I) should take the throne. Karl Friedrich, Prince of Hohenzollern, who is Heir 13 in this thread, is not interested, and because recent monarchs and pretenders generally try to promote their own (female) children and grandchildren, rather than the (male) heirs-presumptive, King Michael changed the method of succession several years before his death. Therefore, Princess Margareta is the heiress-apparent. I wish her luck.

As for Alfred, he was Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha because his uncle died without any legitimate issue AND Queen Victoria did not desire a personal union between the Duchy and the UK. 

P.S. Peter, would you please add the next heir to the list? Thanks a lot!
Peter

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Reply with quote  #74 
I have done so, but wish to reiterate my profound disagreement with I. Said for the record, not in any spirit of resentment, it's hardly news that people disagree with me over this. Though any trolls who might wish to do so on this thread need not bother, their comments should they make any will be deleted without response.
Murtagon

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Reply with quote  #75 
I honestly have no idea what you mean by that, Peter. Does this have anything to do with Carol Lambrino and his sons? If so, then I did originally intend to show that line as an alternative genealogical representation.

Edit: Having read what I've written again, well... Margareta has the required descents for this thread, so that's why I added her. If there had been a jab, it wasn't aimed at you.
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