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KYMonarchist

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Shields_by-election,_2013

South Shields held a by-election today to replace David Miliband after he resigned, and Labour retained the seat with about 50.4% of the vote. UKIP came in second with about a quarter of the vote, the Conservatives came in third with about a tenth of the vote, and the Lib Dems came in behind the BNP, with their vote collapsing to a grand total of 352 votes (1.4% of the vote!). Turnout was ~39%, down 18% from the general election. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom_local_elections,_2013

Local elections were also held today, and you can find the results as they come in here (this should happen on Friday): 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-21240025
KYMonarchist

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Reply with quote  #557 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhutanese_National_Council_election,_2013

On April 23rd, Bhutan held elections for the National Council, the upper house of its legislature. All candidates were independents as members of the National Council of Bhutan are prohibited from belonging to a political party. Twenty members were elected, and the other five National Council members were appointed by a dragon who rules Bhutan (the Bhutanese monarch is really a dragon).

The elections appear to have gone off credibly, and I would say Bhutan is further cementing its status as the best liberal democracy in South Asia. 'Course, I'm not sure if there are any others in that part of the world yet. Whatever, yay Bhutan!
royalcello

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Reply with quote  #558 
Personally I find Bhutan's democratization (which, ironically, was never clearly desired by a majority of the people) unnecessary and a bit sad.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #559 
I think Bhutan has been much more cautious and conservative about democratisation though. And the two political parties essentially support the vision of the King. It is just a codification or tweaking of the rules of order and conduct, but not much more. It always helps to mention that Bhutan affords a better quality of life (and by some measures, a higher per capita income) to its people than China or India.
KYMonarchist

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Reply with quote  #560 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYMonarchist


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom_local_elections,_2013

Local elections were also held today, and you can find the results as they come in here (this should happen on Friday): 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-21240025


The results are in in the UK local elections for this year. 

Both directly-elected mayors that were up were won by Labour. In the Isle of Anglesey, the only Welsh council up for election, the situation remains one of no overall control.

Among the remaining councils (all in England) the Conservatives won the most seats and retained control of most councils, however Labour picked up a couple and retained control of their only council that was up. Also, several councils went from Conservative control to no overall control.

In terms of vote percentage and councillors elected, the Conservatives won 25% of the popular vote (their worst figure their since 1982) and managed to elect 1,136 councillors. Labour won 29% of the popular vote and managed to elect 538 councillors. The Lib Dems won 14% of the popular vote (their worst ever showing) and managed to elect 352 councillors. UKIP won 23% of the popular vote and managed to elect 147 councillors.

Overall, the results were a mixed bag, but principally status quo for the Conservatives, terrible for the Lib Dems, and rather good for Labour and UKIP.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #561 
Excellent for UKIP. It is the best slap in the face to the degenerate "Conservative" party, that right-wing voters of every shade have a real option in UKIP.
KYMonarchist

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Reply with quote  #562 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malaysian_general_election,_2013

General elections were held in Malaysia on May 5th.

The incumbent Barisan Nasional won 46.66% of the votes and attained 133 seats in total (down 7 from the last election in 2008), enough for incumbent PM Najib Razak to retain a majority government.

The component parties of the Barisan Nasional performed as follows:

  • The United Malays National Organization (UMNO), Najib Razak's party, won 28.87% of the votes and attained 88 seats, up 9 from the 2008 election.
  • The United Traditional Bumiputera Party won 2.07% of the vote and attained 14 seats, no change from 2008.
  • The Malaysian Chinese Association won 8.00% of the vote and attained 7 seats, down 8 from 2008.
  • The Sarawak People's Party won 0.53% of the vote and attained 6 seats, no change from 2008.
  • The Malaysian Indian Congress won 2.60% of the vote and attained 4 seats, up 1 from 2008.
  • The United Sabah Party won 0.78% of the vote and attained 4 seats, up 1 from 2008.
  • The Sarawak Progressive Democratic Party won 0.49% of the vote and attained 4 seats, no change from 2008.
  • The United Pasokmomogun Kadazandusun Murut Organisation won 0.59% of the vote and attained 3 seats, down 1 from 2008.
  • The Malaysian People's Movement Party won 1.36% of the vote and attained 1 seat, down 1 from 2008.
  • The Sarawak United People's Party won 1.19% of the vote and attained 1 seat, down 5 from 2008.
  • The United Sabah People's Party won 0.08% of the vote and attained 1 seat, no change from 2008.
  • The People's Progressive Party of Malaysia won 0.06% of the vote and attained no seats, no change from 2008.
  • The Liberal Democratic Party of Malaysia won absolutely no votes at all and attained no seats either, down 1 from 2008.

The opposition Pakatan Rakyat won 50.10% of the vote and attained 89 seats in total (up 7 from the last election in 2008), which will keep them in opposition, though I'm not sure whether Anwar Ibrahim will still be Leader of the Malaysian Opposition.

The component parties of the Pakatan Rakyat performed as follows:

  • The Democratic Action Party won 15.47% of the vote and attained 38 seats, up 10 from 2008.
  • The People's Justice Party, Anwar Ibrahim's party, won 20.08% of the votes and attained 30 seats, down 1 from 2008.
  • The Pan-Malaysian Islamic Party won 14.55% of the vote and attained 21 seats, down 2 from 2008.
There were no other votes cast in the election. And that's the federal results, folks! The state election results (for all states except Sarawak whose last state election was held in 2011) will follow in the next post.
KYMonarchist

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Reply with quote  #563 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malaysian_general_election,_2013

General elections were held in Malaysia on May 5th.

12 of Malaysia's 13 states held elections for their state legislatures simultaneously with the federal election. Following are the results:

  • In Johor state, the Barisan Nasional won 38 seats, down 12 from the last election, those 12 seats being gained by the Pakatan Rakyat, who won 18 seats. The result is the Barisan Nasional controls Johor.
  • In Kedah state, the Barisan Nasional won 21 seats, up 7 from the last election. The Pakatan Rakyat won 15 seats, down 4 from the last election. In addition, both independents lost their seats. The result is the Barisan Nasional controls Kedah.
  • In Kelantan state, the Barisan Nasional won 12 seats, up 5 from the last election, those 5 seats being gained from the Pakatan Rakyat, who won 33 seats. The result is the Pakatan Rakyat controls Kelantan.
  • In Malacca state, the Barisan Nasional won 21 seats, down 2 seats from the last election, those 2 seats being lost to the Pakatan Rakyat, who won 7 seats. The result is the Barisan Nasional controls Malacca.
  • In Negri Sembilan state, the Barisan Nasional won 22 seats, up 1 from the last election, that 1 seat being gained from the Pakatan Rakyat, who won 14 seats. The result is the Barisan Nasional controls Negri Sembilan.
  • In Pahang state, the Barisan Nasional won 30 seats, down 8 from the last election, those 8 seats being gained by the Pakatan Rakyat, who won 12 seats. The result is the Barisan Nasional controls Pahang.
  • In Penang state, the Barisan Nasional won 10 seats, down 1 from the last election, that 1 seat being gained by the Pakatan Rakyat, who won 30 seats. The result is the Pakatan Rakyat controls Penang.
  • In Perak state, the Barisan Nasional won 31 seats, up 3 seats from the last election. The Pakatan Rakyat won 28 seats, no change from the last election. In addition, all 4 independents lost their seats. The result is the Barisan Nasional controls Perak.
  • In Perlis state, the Barisan Nasional won 13 seats and the Pakatan Rakyat won 2 seats, neither group changing the number of seats they hold from the last election. The result is the Barisan Nasional controls Perlis.
  • In Sabah state, the Barisan Nasional won 48 seats, down 9 from the last election. The Pakatan Rakyat won 11 seats, up 10 from the last election. In addition, 1 independent won a seat, down 1 from the last election. The result is the Barisan Nasional controls Sabah.
  • In Selangor state, the Barisan Nasional won 12 seats, down 9 from the last election. The Pakatan Rakyat won 44 seats, up 10 from the last election. The result is the Pakatan Rakyat controls Selangor.
  • In Terengganu state, the Barisan Nasional won 17 seats, down 7 form the last election, those 7 seats being gained by the Pakatan Rakyat, who won 15 seats. The result is the Barisan Nasional controls Terengganu.

And that's it for the state election results, folks! Following will be a short analysis post.
KYMonarchist

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Reply with quote  #564 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malaysian_general_election,_2013

Opposition leader Anwar Ibrahim called for two days of protests over what he alleged was massive electoral fraud at the hands of the incumbent government and the Electoral Commission.

Also, the results showed a very divided Malaysia, with urban and minority voters largely supporting the opposition Pakatan Rakyat, while rural and indigenous voters largely voted for the Barisan Nasional.

The biggest thing of the night was the massive swing of ethnic Chinese voters from the Barisan Nasional-affiliated parties to the Pakatan Rakyat-affiliated parties, principally the Democratic Action Party, which prompted PM Najib Razak, a Malay, to allege that the opposition manipulated and deceived Chinese voters into swamping the BN with a "Chinese tsunami". These comments by the PM in turn caused fears of racial and ethnic tensions to surge, a fear ever-present in Malaysia since the 1969 race riots.

We'll see what happens in Malaysia in the coming weeks and months. The next election is due in 2018.
KYMonarchist

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Reply with quote  #565 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Columbia_general_election,_2013

The Canadian province of British Columbia held its 40th general election yesterday.

The polls predicted a sizable win for the opposition NDP under Adrian Dix and they proved to be completely and utterly wrong!

The incumbent Liberal Party of British Columbia under Premier Christy Clark won a majority government.

The BC Liberals won 50 seats, 7 over the 43 needed to get a majority.
The BC NDP won 33 seats, actually below their performance in the 2009 election.
The BC Greens won only 1 seat, despite the party's leader Jane Sterk failing to win a seat herself.
The BC Conservatives failed to win any seats, and I believe leader John Cummins will resign.
One independent won a seat as well.

The funniest thing about this election is the fact that Premier Christy Clark failed to win the seat she contested, losing to the NDP candidate, despite her own party pulling off a major upset! (Clark apparently refused to run in a safer seat.)

An interesting fact I noticed about the votes in the election is that the Greens likely caused a huge spoiler effect, as their votes were quite often a higher number than the margin of difference between the Liberal and NDP candidates!

Christy Clark still gets to be an extra-Parliamentary Premier, because convention apparently dictates that if their Premier loses their own seat even though their party wins government, they can still serve from outside the legislature as long as they run (and presumably win) in the next available by-election.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #566 
This one was quite a shock and had an unusual outcome. For a while in the last few years it looked as if the BC Conservatives were going to gain ground by capitalising on disenchantment with the Liberals, but this hasn't happened.
KYMonarchist

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Reply with quote  #567 
http://www.sabc.co.za/news/a/e4d6c2004fdf13b6a9fbeb0b5d39e4bb/Swaziland-elections-set-for-September-20130406

Swaziland will hold parliamentary elections on September 20th, and the opposition is urging a boycott, claiming the new parliament will merely be a rubber stamp. Maybe if they participated, that wouldn't be likely.
KYMonarchist

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Reply with quote  #568 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhutanese_National_Assembly_election,_2013

Bhutan held elections for its lower house, the National Assembly, on May 31st and July 13th. Four parties competed in the first round, reduce to two in the second round, and the winner with 32 of the 47 seats was the opposition People's Democratic Party, with the ruling Bhutan Peace and Prosperity Party reduced to 15 seats from 45. PDP leader Tshering Tobgay will become PM after a 10-day period for complaints and petitions to be heard. Also three women were elected, and PDP member Dorji Choden is expected to become Bhutan's first female minister. Turnout in the second round was about 66%. If this new government comes in smoothly, I will proclaim Bhutan the first liberal democracy in all of South Asia! Interesting that they're also the only monarchy in South Asia too...
KYMonarchist

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Reply with quote  #569 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_House_of_Councillors_election,_2013

Japan held elections for the House of Councillors, the upper house of its legislature, on July 21st. I will present the new composition by party in the House of Councillors, and suppose I should also mention that the elections were only for 121 of the 242 seats, House of Councillors elections being staggered, half the house being elected for 6-year terms every 3 years. This election was for the Councillors elected in 2007.

The new composition of the House of Councillors of Japan by party after its most recent election is as follows:

Liberal Democratic Party:      115 seats
Democratic Party:                59 seats
New Komeito Party:              20 seats
Your Party:                         18 seats
Japanese Communist Party:    11 seats
Japan Restoration Party:        9 seats
Social Democratic Party:        3 seats
People's Life Party:               2 seats
New Renaissance Party:         1 seat
Okinawa Socialist Mass Party: 1 seat
Independents:                      3 seats

Now, you can see that the Liberal Democratic Party of incumbent PM Shinzo Abe failed to win a majority in the upper house on its own. However, their coalition partners the New Komeito Party have 20 seats, which puts the LDP-NKP coalition past the 122-seat threshold for a majority. This ends the divided legislature which prevailed since the Democratic Party of Japan lost its upper house majority in the 2010 elections. The next elections for the House of Councillors are due to be held in 2016, for the members elected in 2010, oddly enough the same year as elections for the lower house of the Diet, the House of Representatives, are also due. I expect that the election dates for the Councillors and Representatives, due in mid-2016 and December 2016, respectively, will probably be merged and what will in effect be a giant referendum on the LDP's return to government will occur sometime in the summer of 2016.
KYMonarchist

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Reply with quote  #570 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kuwaiti_general_election,_2013

Kuwait held its third general election in 2 years on July 27th. This one was held after Kuwait's Constitutional Court ruled the last election and dissolution of Parliament by HH the Emir in December to be unconstitutional. 

The National Assembly has 50 seats, but I could only find results for 42 of them.

Here they are:
Tribal candidates stayed at a strength of 24 seats.
Liberals, presumably of the National Democratic Alliance who boycotted the last elections in December but decided to contest this one (unlike most liberal and Islamist groups), won 3 seats.
Sunni candidates won 7 seats, up two from the December elections.
Shi'ite candidates won 8 seats, down substantially from the 17 seats they won in December.
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