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Ethiomonarchist

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Egypts Supreme Court has ruled that the newly elected Islamist dominated parliament is illegitimate since at least one third of it was elected unconstitutionally.  It has ordered Parliament disolved and new elections.  The court has also ruled that former Prime Minister Shafiq is allowed to continue his run for the presidency throwing out the challenge to his ability to do so.  The rulings are seen as a blow against the Islamists by Egypt's civilian and military establishment.


http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/lookout/egypt-parliament-dissolved-election-unconstitutional-141435793.html


http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/egypts-high-court-keeps-shafiq-in-race-suggests-partial-disbandment-of-parliament/2012/06/14/gJQA0h2GcV_story.html

http://www.cnn.com/2012/06/14/world/meast/egypt-ruling/index.html?section=cnn_latest

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The Lion of Judah hath prevailed.

Ethiopia stretches her hands unto God (Quote from Psalm 68 which served as the Imperial Motto of the Ethiopian Empire)

"God and history shall remember your judgment." (Quote from Emperor Haile Selassie I's speech to the League of Nations to plead for assistance against the Italian Invasion, 1936.)
DutchMonarchist

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A shameful decision, clearly meant to keep the old regime in power. They aparantly don't want a parliament around during the presidential election, which makes me fear for what is to come. Shafiq must be defeated, and the vile legacy of Nasser must be destroyed completely - otherwise the military will use any chance it gets to restore dictatorship.

Ethiomonarchist

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A shameful decision, clearly meant to keep the old regime in power. They aparantly don't want a parliament around during the presidential election, which makes me fear for what is to come. Shafiq must be defeated, and the vile legacy of Nasser must be destroyed completely - otherwise the military will use any chance it gets to restore dictatorship.

 


...and allow the crazy Salafists and other hard line Islamists that now dominate the parliament to take over and religate non-muslims to the wilderness?    Do you think the Islamists are going to set up an open democratic regime when they've been busy excluding everyone who disagrees with them, from Mubarak regime alumni to Copts to moderate Islamists, to secularists etc?

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The Lion of Judah hath prevailed.

Ethiopia stretches her hands unto God (Quote from Psalm 68 which served as the Imperial Motto of the Ethiopian Empire)

"God and history shall remember your judgment." (Quote from Emperor Haile Selassie I's speech to the League of Nations to plead for assistance against the Italian Invasion, 1936.)
DutchMonarchist

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Not all islamists are salafist and hardlines - in fact, I believe most them are not. Turkey is ruled by an islamic political party, and while one can certainly have criticism on Erdogans regime, he is hardly a fundamentalist.

I understand they are excluding alumni from Mubaraks regime, who have been repressing them for so long. I would wish they were more considerate of Christians, but we should consider they had a big majority in parliament. If the democrats or republicans in the US would win such a landslide victory, would they be working with the small minority that was left if they had the chance to rule without them? I don't think so.  
DavidV

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The case for constitutional monarchy in Egypt is only stronger.

DutchMonarchist is right. There are many radically different straints of Islam in Egypt- the Muslim Brotherhood is far more moderate compared to the Salafist far right. They will most likely form a coalition with secular parties, and they did not win an outright majority anyway.
Ethiomonarchist

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Not all islamists are salafist and hardlines - in fact, I believe most them are not. Turkey is ruled by an islamic political party, and while one can certainly have criticism on Erdogans regime, he is hardly a fundamentalist.

I understand they are excluding alumni from Mubaraks regime, who have been repressing them for so long. I would wish they were more considerate of Christians, but we should consider they had a big majority in parliament. If the democrats or republicans in the US would win such a landslide victory, would they be working with the small minority that was left if they had the chance to rule without them? I don't think so.  


The majority of Islamists elected to the Egyptian parliament are in fact Salafists and most of the rest are far from moderate.  The situation is not even remotely similar to the situation in Turkey and no Islamist leader in Egypt is even close to being anywhere near Erdogan to be comparable as far as policy.  It is not a question of being considerate of Christians, they have been grossly intollerant and have made it clear there is no room for Christians, secularists, or moderates in Egypt's new political space.  Majority rule is one thing but majority oppression of minorities is what is happening in Egypt.  I'm sorry but I can find no sympaty for them.

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The Lion of Judah hath prevailed.

Ethiopia stretches her hands unto God (Quote from Psalm 68 which served as the Imperial Motto of the Ethiopian Empire)

"God and history shall remember your judgment." (Quote from Emperor Haile Selassie I's speech to the League of Nations to plead for assistance against the Italian Invasion, 1936.)
DavidV

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The Salafist bloc is the second-largest in Parliament and comprises three parties. The Muslim Brotherhood front Freedom and Justice Party is the largest, allied with smaller parties (not all of them religious). The third and fourth largest blocs are the New Wafd and Egyptian Bloc, both secular, while the moderate Muslim Brotherhood breakaway Al-Wasat (Centre) is the fifth largest.
DutchMonarchist

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I was also under the impression that the non-Salafists were bigger than the Salafists, and the results on wikipedia seem to confirm this, though I guess it may vary depending on your definition of a salafist.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egyptian_parliamentary_election,_2011%E2%80%932012

Ethiomonarchist, I understand your concerns and I also do not have any sympathy for the islamists. I have even less sympathy for Mubaraks regime, however. I also wish that El-Shater wouldn't have been disqualified... he was a strong supporter of the free market, an indication that he wasn't a radical islamist or something. I am less certain about Morsi, but I agree with the movement of 6 april that even he is better than Shafiq. Don't forget that the army has also been shooting down Christian protestors!
DavidV

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The choice between a Muslim Brotherhood candidate (who, btw, taught in the US and has an American family- while the Salafist candidate was disqualified because his mother is a US citizen!) and a former Mubarak loyalist does not sit well with many Egyptians. It only strengthens the case for a monarchy to act as a unifier and arbitrator between the country's squabbling factions.

Anyway, the rundown on the various parties and alliances:

Freedom and Justice Party - aka Muslim Brotherhood. Largest party in Parliament, moderate Islamist and not inclined to work with the more extreme Salafists.
Its allied parties in the Democratic Alliance:
Ghad (Tomorrow) - liberal party led by Ayman Nour, vocal opponent of Mubarak in recent years.
Dignity Party - left-wing, Nasserist party
Egyptian Arab Socialist Party - as above
Civilisation Party - centrist
Reform Party - centrist
Islamic Labour Party - moderate Islamist, albeit to the left of Muslim Brotherhood
Liberal Party - formed in the 1970s as the ruling Arab Socialist Union split up into three factions, left, right and centre. The "centre" became the National Democratic Party, the "left" became the National Progressive Unionist Party, and the "right" became the Liberal Party. Moderately Islamic, in 1987 it formed an alliance with the above Islamic Labour Party and the (still banned) Muslim Brotherhood to contest parliamentary elections, in which it emerged as the biggest opposition bloc.
Democratic Generation Party - secular, liberal

The Salafist parties: espouse a Saudi-style Islamic state and society.
Al-Nour
Building and Development Party
Authenticity Party

New Wafd Party: right-liberal, secular, a continuation of the old aristocratic/bourgeois liberal Wafd Party of 1920-52. Legalised

Egyptian Bloc: a coalition left-liberal and social-democratic parties (all secular) that forms the fourth largest bloc in the now dissolved Parliament. Its member parties:
Egyptian Social Democratic Party - social democrats
Free Egyptians Party - liberals
National Progressive Unionist Party or Tagammu - formed in the 1970s as the left or "orthodox Nasserist" wing of the ASU, for years the leading legal leftist opposition group.

Al-Wasat (Centre): a moderate split from the Muslim Brotherhood in 1996.

Revolution Continues Alliance: largely left-leaning and secular. Member parties:
Socialist Popular Alliance Party - radical left
Socialist Party - radical left
Equality and Development Party- moderate left
Freedom Egypt Party - liberal
Current Party - Islamist, Muslim Brotherhood breakaway group
Egyptian Alliance - liberal

Reform and Development Party: secular liberal party founded by Sadad's nephew and a billionaire

Ex-NDP parties: the NDP was disbanded after Mubarak fell, and former Mubarak loyalists formed splinter parties that did win seats:
Freedom Party
National Party of Egypt
Union Party
Egyptian Citizen Party
Arab Egyptian Unity Party

Other parties:
Democratic Peace Party - liberal party erroneously described as an "NDP offshoot" given that it formed before 2011
Conservative Party - right-wing party erroneously described as an "NDP offshoot" given that it formed before 2011
Justice Party - centrist party, won a seat
Arab Democratic Nasserist Party - another Nasserist party
Democratic Front - liberal party, failed to make an impact in the election
Liberation Party - Sufi party, also failed to make an impaact

I think that covers it. You can see alliances are very divergent, with various Islamist, liberal and socialist parties. In a sense it is a return to the politics of pre-1952 Egypt where there was a flourishing of liberal and Islamist politics.

Even with its secularist allies on their list, the Muslim Brotherhood's FJP failed to win a majority outright. The only ideologically coherent bloc is the Salafists, and the Brotherhood was and is unlikely to coalesce with them, and more likely to form a coalition with Al-Wafd and other secular blocs. If the next election produces the same results, let's see...
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