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Admiral_Horthy

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Sad news: Barbados has decided to become a republic.
Peter

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Reply with quote  #2 
It'll be their loss.
VivatReginaScottorum

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Reply with quote  #3 
Can the Barbadian government just go ahead and do this without consulting the people at all? Doesn't sound very democratic to me. If they do hold a referendum on the matter as other Caribbean countries have done in the past, there's a possibility that the public will reject the change.
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That which concerns the mystery of the King's power is not lawful to be disputed; for that is to wade into the weakness of Princes, and to take away the mystical reverence that belongs unto them that sit in the throne of God. - James VI and I of England, Scotland and Ireland
Queenslander

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Reply with quote  #4 
I hope the country falls into ruin, ungrateful sods all those politicians there too gutless to let the people, they claim to represent mind you, have any sort of say in the matter at all, not a good start for that soon to be forgotten backwater and potential colony of Cuba.
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Murtagon

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Reply with quote  #5 
Even though no Barbadian myself, I strongly oppose this turn of events.

One could say that it's because I'm a monarchist - yes, but not only that.

Thing is, the longer a given regime lasts, the more legitimate and acceptable it becomes, which makes its replacement with something else odd, to say the least.

Queen Elizabeth II has reigned in that country for more than five decades... and, suddenly, someone, no, not just someone, the Governor-General herself, decides that enough is enough and the state should become a republic in time for an anniversary. What changed?

The regime was OK in 1971, in 1976, in 1981, in 1986, in 1991, in 1996, in 2001, in 2006, in 2011, in 2016... but it's just a remnant of the "colonial past" in 2021.

Yes, I could agree that it may not be very nice for your Head of State to live in a land, far, far away, but it's the 21st century. If Her Majesty wants, she could board a plane and directly intervene and solve some issue (for example).

A referendum? Why should they waste money on that? Did France, Brazil, Portugal, China, Yugoslavia, Romania, Ethiopia, Iran, Fiji, etc. bother with actually asking their people what they wanted? Nope. Why? Because the results may have had to be turned the other way.

In the end, I can only say that Barbados is still a monarchy so we have time to help matters.

If any Barbadian is reading this: remember the words of Tsar Simeon II : "The president of a republic is as though you pick a player from one of two teams and make him umpire".

Peter

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Reply with quote  #6 
There's also the Margaret Thatcher quote: 'People who think a politician ought to be Head of State perhaps haven't known too many politicians.' Still, if Barbados wants to become yet another drab and dreary republic then so be it. Only the Barbadian people themselves could prevent it happening, and if they don't choose to then that, again, will be their loss.
MonarchistKaiser

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"Fully leave our colonial past behind". Well why not leave behind as well one of the richest economies in the Carribeans thanks to the former colonial rule and also leave behind your best traders since the colonial era, the British and Canadians? I'm sure you'll be fine on your own.
The UK government took too much of a lenient response imo, or perhaps I'm a bit too harsh...
Peter

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It's really no concern of the UK government. Barbados is a fully sovereign and independent country, which just happens to have the same monarch as Britain. Not however the same monarchy, the Barbadian crown is quite separate to that of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. For the UK government to so much as express mild disapproval could only damage the monarchies of all the other Commonwealth Realms, whose peoples have to feel assurance that the shared monarch in no way subjects them to Britain, only (in a constitutional sense) to their own monarchy.

VivatReginaScottorum

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Reply with quote  #9 
It doesn't look like the Barbadian government intend to consult the public on their plans to depose their sovereign, despite the Prime Minister Mia Mottley herself saying in the past that she was "committed to expressing our views to the public and having them pass judgement on it." Apparently her commitment has waned since then. See also this article by a self-important boob at Coventry University arguing that it is the right thing to do away with the monarchy without a referendum because if you let the public vote then they may not vote the right way. My favourite part is when the author cites Fiji as one of the countries where the monarchy was abolished without a referendum, and where "the abolition of the monarchy... didn’t lead to protests, or dissatisfaction with the respective governments." The Fijian monarchy was toppled in a coup d'état that established a military dictatorship; anyone protesting or expressing "dissatisfaction" with the new government would likely have ended up being shot. And of course he closes the article with the typical republican non-argument that monarchy is "anachronistic," which is about as effective an argument as saying "monarchy is dumb." The sheer amount of doublethink necessary to argue that monarchy lacks democratic legitimacy but that the public shouldn't be consulted on its abolition in case they vote to retain it is rather impressive. But of course, we're the ones whose views are irrational. 
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That which concerns the mystery of the King's power is not lawful to be disputed; for that is to wade into the weakness of Princes, and to take away the mystical reverence that belongs unto them that sit in the throne of God. - James VI and I of England, Scotland and Ireland
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