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Peter

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Reply with quote  #1 
I'd suggest a few additions to royalcello's blog entry on the subject, the first two tentative as arguably not royalty. In 1826 in Tallahassee, Florida the 2nd Prince Murat married Catherine Dangerfield Willis. There was no issue, but there was from the marriage of his brother the 3rd Prince to Caroline Fraser, which took place in Bordentown, New Jersey in 1831. Descendants of this couple include members of more generally recognised royal lines, the father of these two Princes Murat having of course been Joachim Murat who was Napoleon's brother-in-law and inter alia King of Naples in the Napoleonic period (and the only man ever to formally bear that title).

A variety of Romanovs married American wives, but mostly they were children or descendants of morganatic marriages so without authentic royal title (which didn't stop some of them from assuming one). An exception was HH Princess Xenia of Russia, whom royalcello notes; another was HH Prince Rostislav, who married as his second wife Alice Eilken, of Chicago. Also Grand Duke Dmitri of Russia, one of Rasputin's murderers, married Audrey Emery, of Ohio.

No doubt other examples could be found, though generally I would think they would be debatable as to royal status. Not what the blog entry was about, but I'll throw in some American ancestry of undoubted royalty, Habsburg-Lorraine and other descendants of the 3rd Prince Murat and Caroline Fraser aside. The late Diana, Princess of Wales was granddaughter on her mother's side of the 4th Baron Fermoy. His own mother was Frances Ellen Work, daughter of Franklin Work, a wealthy New York stockbroker. Princes William and Harry thus have an American great-great-grandmother.

More remote is their American ancestry on their father's side. Rather than elaborately describe it, I'll just put in this link (takes ages to load but does get there, and is worth the wait) showing the ancestry down to the Queen. I could continue on the theme, for example the Bavarian Counts of Toerring-Jettenbach, whose line has entered a couple of royal houses, are descended from the Revolutionary War general John Cadwalader. But that'll do to be going on with.
DC

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Reply with quote  #2 
American women were quite an attractive prospect because of the wealth they could bring with a marriage, and for the ladies they would be getting a title and a raised social status so mutually beneficial. 

Quite a lot of the princes attempts to find American wife's are covered in old newspapers, particularly American ones. Duke Heinrich Borwin of Mecklenburg married a wealthy American widow as his first wife, and that marriage, divorce and her legal action against him is covered in the newspapers from the day, he also took an American as his second wife. 

Both uncles of the current Duke of Braganza were careless with money and tried to find an American wife living in exile probably didn't help their financial situation either. Prince Francis Joseph of Braganza failed to find a wife, his brother the Duke of Viseu succeeded though. 

The Duke of the Abruzzi wanted to marry Katherine Elkins, daughter of an American senator, but his cousin King Victor Emmanuell III refused to grant permission.

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Peter

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Reply with quote  #3 

No doubt many of these marriages were for wealth, not I would suppose all though. I hadn't noticed that there were some comments to the entry suggesting a few additional names that hadn't occurred to me, including a couple you also mention, plus Grand Duke Dmitri who had. Royalcello, I now learn, has a page listing all the original people plus these additions. Prince Rostislav however is not there and was of fully royal parentage on both sides, so no doubt his second wife will be added in due course. Whether the two Princesses Murat will be is up to him; I would, especially since Jerome Bonaparte's American first wife is already there, but unlike with Prince Rostislav the royal status of the Princes Murat is debatable. 

A further addition would be Nancy Leishman, of Pittsburgh, daughter of the well-known businessman John Leishman, who married Karl Rudolf, 13th Duke of Cro├┐. This is a mediatised line regarded as of fully royal rank for marriage purposes, so I believe she should qualify.

royalcello

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Reply with quote  #4 
Yes, I added Prince Rostislav; thanks.  I've decided somewhat arbitrarily not to count princely or ducal families other than the three that continue to reign today, defining "royalty" with regard to twentieth century sovereign status of the territory in question rather than marital qualifications.  (I suppose Sikkim, never fully sovereign in the 20th century due to first British and then Indian "protectorate" status, is a bit of an unprincipled exception.  Oh well.)  One could argue that due to the root of the word, "royalty" technically refers to only the families of kings (or emperors), though for obvious reasons excluding Monaco from this list would have been out of the question.  

I don't think I'll count the Murats either.  In my opinion the revival of the Empire under Napoleon III requires the Bonapartes to be taken more seriously dynastically than the Murats--one disputed parvenu sovereign reigning for seven years does not a "royal family" make, but two emperors a half-century apart reigning for a total of 29 years but casting a far larger shadow than that figure implies arguably does.
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