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DavidV

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Reply with quote  #61 
The anti-Trump movement are just like Remainiacs:
http://www.opposingviews.com/i/society/turns-out-majority-trump-protesters-portland-have-one-thing-common?fb=rwn
Ethiomonarchist

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Reply with quote  #62 
The Kushner vs. Christie saga really is something out of "The Borgia's". I feel icky after reading this.

http://www.cnn.com/2016/11/16/politics/trump-transition-jared-kushner-chris-christie/index.html

The difference between previous transitions and the current one are significant and the alarm is not exaggerated. Both the State Department and the Pentagon have stated that their transition offices are empty and they have had no contact with The President elects team. Trump is meeting with the Prime Minister of Japan today without the benefit of a briefing by the State Department. None of this is normal a week into a transition.

Usually at this stage transition teams are expanding and names are being added and the new administration broadens itself with new appointments and assignments. The Trump team is engaging in increasingly public infighting and a purge of Christie allies.

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The Lion of Judah hath prevailed.

Ethiopia stretches her hands unto God (Quote from Psalm 68 which served as the Imperial Motto of the Ethiopian Empire)

"God and history shall remember your judgment." (Quote from Emperor Haile Selassie I's speech to the League of Nations to plead for assistance against the Italian Invasion, 1936.)
Ethiomonarchist

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Reply with quote  #63 
The Saudis are very nervous about President-Elect Trump and his threat to stop all oil imports from Saudi Arabia unless they commit ground troops in Syria or fund the effort.  Some believe that this was just empty campaign rhetoric, but the Saudis seem to be very worried.  To be perfectly frank this is one Trump policy I can get behind.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/timdaiss/2016/11/16/no-saudi-oil-says-trump-saudi-arabia-fires-back/#52eade09708b

http://money.cnn.com/2016/11/16/investing/trump-saudi-arabia-ban-oil-imports-opec/

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trump-saudi-kemp-idUSKBN13B2GN

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The Lion of Judah hath prevailed.

Ethiopia stretches her hands unto God (Quote from Psalm 68 which served as the Imperial Motto of the Ethiopian Empire)

"God and history shall remember your judgment." (Quote from Emperor Haile Selassie I's speech to the League of Nations to plead for assistance against the Italian Invasion, 1936.)
Wessexman

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Reply with quote  #64 
Yes, the real area where something unusual is happening is in national security posts. Many leading figures denounced Trump. It is still early days, but he will somehow have to bring some on these people on board.

Still, a lot of the coverage is over the top:

http://www.breitbart.com/video/2016/11/16/krauthammer-trump-transition-coverage-remarkably-over-the-top/amp/?client=ms-android-zte

We should give it the four or five weeks that presidents Reagan or Carter or Obama took to fully get on top of the transition. In some cases, even that wouldn't be that important. As Krauthammer puts it, to not have a treasury secretary ready to be appointed in January wouldn't be the end of the American polity, though in areas of national security, Trump will need to make sure he gets his act in order.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #65 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethiomonarchist
The Saudis are very nervous about President-Elect Trump and his threat to stop all oil imports from Saudi Arabia unless they commit ground troops in Syria or fund the effort.  Some believe that this was just empty campaign rhetoric, but the Saudis seem to be very worried.  To be perfectly frank this is one Trump policy I can get behind.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/timdaiss/2016/11/16/no-saudi-oil-says-trump-saudi-arabia-fires-back/#52eade09708b

http://money.cnn.com/2016/11/16/investing/trump-saudi-arabia-ban-oil-imports-opec/

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trump-saudi-kemp-idUSKBN13B2GN


Have I not said a million times that Arab problems can only be solved by Arabs? Syria and Iraq ARE solvable problems if Arabs themselves do it and not rely on others.

Meanwhile, you wonder if the Clinton and Obama Democratd were promoting the Muslim Brotherhood at the expense of Arab regimes and other brands of Islam:
https://english.alarabiya.net/en/features/2016/11/17/University-that-connects-Hillary-Clinton-Saleha-Abedin-and-the-Muslim-Brotherhood.html
Wessexman

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Reply with quote  #66 
This would be certainly be an interesting choice for a secretary of defence or state, and perhaps a wise one:

https://www.yahoo.com/news/supporters-float-jim-webbs-name-for-top-trump-defense-or-state-job-200238800.html?soc_src=mail&soc_trk=ma


Wessexman

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Reply with quote  #67 
Trump seems to have met with Kissinger, amongst others, after all: 

http://thehill.com/homenews/administration/306604-trump-meets-with-henry-kissinger
Wessexman

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Reply with quote  #68 
Interesting comments from David Axelrod:

http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/axelrod-scolds-critics-of-trumps-transition-progress/article/2607686
Quote:

Lots of reasons to be concerned about @realDonaldTrump transition but the pace of announcements isn't one of them. That's not a fair shot.


I do agree that in certain areas, especially national security, there is some cause for concern. We'll see what happens, though. Some of those Trump seems to be meeting, like Kissinger and even Romney, do seem to signal that he will reach out and bring in those he needs.


DavidV

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Reply with quote  #69 
UKIP's Paul Nuttall hits out at Obama who has barely concealed his dislike for Britain:

http://www.express.co.uk/news/politics/733532/Paul-Nuttall-Barack-Obama-Donald-Trump-Winston-Churchill-bust

In fairness, this is no different to the Labour Party, whose ranks are infested with people who have an animus to British people, culture and institutions because of their sense of "victimhood" owing to belonging to certain minority groups.
Ethiomonarchist

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Reply with quote  #70 
Quote:
UKIP's Paul Nuttall hits out at Obama who has barely concealed his dislike for Britain:

http://www.express.co.uk/news/politics/733532/Paul-Nuttall-Barack-Obama-Donald-Trump-Winston-Churchill-bust

In fairness, this is no different to the Labour Party, whose ranks are infested with people who have an animus to British people, culture and institutions because of their sense of "victimhood" owing to belonging to certain minority groups.


UKIP's Paul Nuttall is being nutty.  Belonging to "certain minority groups" does not make people anti-British".  Does belonging to a majority automatically make someone racist/xenophobic/etc?  It is ridiculous.

If you ask me Obama has been shown to be quite a anglophone.  He has spoken of his deep respect and affection for the Queen, and has shown the same towards the Prince of Wales and his sons.  His wife and children were even hosted privately by the Queen and took a tour of Britain, not something an anti-British father would allow don't you think?  Moving a bust out of his office is hardly an indication that he hates Britain.  I think it is no secret that he did not get one well with Prime Minister Gordon Brown.  I think people are mistaking this added to the whole over-reaction to removing the bust for anti-British sentiment.

Back to the topic at hand though, President-Elect Trump has made a few very significant National Security appointments.  The addition of former Governor and Presidential Candidate Mitt Romney to the list of possible Secretary of State candidates is interesting since he is such a vociferous critic of Trump's.  However, he is in my opinion far superior to any other candidate named so far.  Governor Haley is another Secretary of State candidate that has caused some surprise as she is also a Trump critic.  That he took counsel from Henry Kissinger is also somewhat reassuring (although I know that wont make him popular by either the protesters or the Alt Right).  I'm beginning to think that some pundits are right that this seeming chaotic transition is Trump's administrative style and that it works for him.  Let's see how it all ends up...

http://www.cnn.com/2016/11/18/politics/trump-transition-rollercoaster-ride/index.html

Trump's pick for National Security advisor may have a bit of an issue...

https://www.yahoo.com/news/michael-flynn-key-trump-aide-sat-in-on-intel-briefings-while-advising-foreign-clients-004512931.html

__________________
The Lion of Judah hath prevailed.

Ethiopia stretches her hands unto God (Quote from Psalm 68 which served as the Imperial Motto of the Ethiopian Empire)

"God and history shall remember your judgment." (Quote from Emperor Haile Selassie I's speech to the League of Nations to plead for assistance against the Italian Invasion, 1936.)
Windemere

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Reply with quote  #71 
I think former Gov. Romney would be an asset to Trump's administration. He's a Republican with moderately conservative views, and is a proven statesman. His positions are quite similar to those of Trump's, albeit probably a bit more reasonable, and appealling to mainstream politicians. In order to implement his policies, Trump will need the support of Congress, and Romney could help with that. During the presidential primaries, Romney did lead an effort to obstruct Trump's nomination, and he referred to Trump as a "phony" and a "fraud". But after the election, Romney called Trump to congratulate him on his victory. They ought to be able to find some common ground.
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Dis Aliter Visum "Beware of martyrs and those who would die for their beliefs; for they frequently make many others die with them, often before them, sometimes instead of them."
Ethiomonarchist

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Reply with quote  #72 
Alot of fury being directed at Ivanka Trump for appearing in photographs of her father receiving the Prime Minister of Japan.  I don't really understand what the huge fuss is about.  Although she is supposed to be helping run her father's business and shouldn't be getting the advantages afforded by close proximity to world leaders, I don't see why she can't be there to greet visitors, especially if she is standing in for her step-mother who doesn't seem to have been there.  I agree that she shouldn't have been there, but perhaps people are overreacting a little?

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3949512/Trumps-trigger-Twitter-meltdown-Pictures-leggy-Ivanka-Jared-Kushner-joining-President-elect-Donald-meeting-Japanese-Prime-Minister-draw-criticism.html

__________________
The Lion of Judah hath prevailed.

Ethiopia stretches her hands unto God (Quote from Psalm 68 which served as the Imperial Motto of the Ethiopian Empire)

"God and history shall remember your judgment." (Quote from Emperor Haile Selassie I's speech to the League of Nations to plead for assistance against the Italian Invasion, 1936.)
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #73 
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Janet Albrechtsen
Hip educators love to talk about so-called “teachable moments” that emerge from listening to and responding to the cues of children so that teaching relates to real-life events. It’s appropriate, then, that the infantile reactions to Donald Trump winning the US presidential election provide so many teachable moments. While it’s an open question whether those who have succumbed to puerile reactions are willing to learn anything about themselves, we can at least thank them for explaining, in the clearest of terms, why Trump won.
 
First, Trump’s win provides an unmistakeable teachable moment about a complacent generation’s waning commitment to democracy. In 2013, the Lowy Institute poll found that among people aged 18 to 29, fewer than half said democracy was preferable to any other kind of government. More than one-fifth of this young cohort said that it didn’t matter what kind of government we had. The same poll this year found that just 61 per cent of the population and 54 per cent of 18 to 29-year-olds think “democracy is preferable to any other kind of government”.
 
Those dismal numbers sprang to life these past few weeks on the streets of New York, Miami, Atlanta, Philadelphia, San Francisco and elsewhere when thousands of anti-Trump protesters showed their disdain for a democratic election result. Those city streets were full of those from a pampered generation who have rarely heard the word no. This is the safe-space, all-must-have-prizes, trigger-warning generation, the children of helicopter parents who have been taught they should be protected from what upsets them.
 
When the election didn’t go their way, they, like children, chose infantile tantrums over grown-up concession and respect for democracy. Their progressive tilt against democracy will only confirm to Trump supporters that they made the correct decision.
 
In New York last week, when vice-president-elect Mike Pence attended the blockbuster Broadway show Hamilton, many in the crowd booed him and the stage actors gathered to harangue him. Revealing contempt for or ignorance of their country’s history, including the subject of the Broadway show, the baying crowd and hectoring actors proved why Trump voters felt utterly disconnected from insider elites. After all, as one of America’s finest founding fathers, Alexander Hamilton, told the New York State convention meeting to adopt the federal Constitution on July 27, 1788: “Here, sir, the people govern; here they act by their immediate representatives.”
 
Trump and Pence, not to mention the Republicans who will control both houses of congress, are the people’s democratically elected representatives.
 
In Australia, Roz Ward, the Marxist academic from La Trobe University, provided a living, breathing, berating insight into the Left’s hypocrisy. The woman who is responsible for the Safe Schools program in Victoria, embraced by Victorian Labor Premier Daniel Andrews, took to the streets of Melbourne to protest against Trump and then physically harassed a man wearing a Trump hat. Ward exposed the fact she’s not interested in anti-bullying but instead is committed to the new fascism where dissent from her views is not tolerated.
 
Trump supporters are entitled to feel further validated in their choice when they remember how sections of the media hyperventilated over the prospect of Trump voters not accepting the election result if their candidate lost to Hillary Clinton.
 
It would be a serious undermining of democracy, the pundits said on CNN and elsewhere. In another teachable moment about hypocrisy, these same people haven’t raised an eyebrow over the thousands protesting against Trump’s victory.
 
Perhaps the most incisive teachable moment from Trump’s win is the propensity of the current generation to see themselves as hapless injured parties rather than resilient, robust individuals. The cues, even in Australia, tell the story: an after-school club at Newtown Public School in Sydney’s inner west received “art therapy” because they were upset over Trump’s win and were chanting “we hate Trump”.
 
It’s hard to imagine how children as young as five talk about killing Trump unless their parents have projected their own hate and outrage on to their kids. That parental irresponsibility is only compounded by introducing therapy to help five-year-olds deal with an election result. How will the kids cope when they fail a test or don’t make the netball team?
 
Then again, why wouldn’t a trendy inner-city school offer therapy for kids when one of Australia’s biggest accounting firms, PricewaterhouseCoopers, offers the same to its adult employees? Proving that the firm’s dodgy and highly political report in March about a gay marriage referendum was not peak stupidity, PwC boss Luke Sayers has launched his firm to new heights of absurdity. On November 10 Sayers sent a letter to PwC’s 7000 Australian employees offering them counselling in the wake of the US election result.
 
The sad learning from Sayers’s letter is that it confirms how the virtues of resilience and true grit have been relegated to the past, replaced by self-indulgence and victimhood. After all, November 8 marked a democratic election, not a terrorist attack. The rush to offer therapy for an election result signals why millions of ordinary Americans picked the politically incorrect Trump over Clinton. Here, writ large, was the democratic rejection of the cultural malaise that Sayers epitomises.
 
Make America great again? The starting point ought to be making America tough again. And we could aim to do the same in Australia. A few hundred years ago, colonial pioneers forged a new home in a daunting but beautiful country. Less than 100 years ago, postwar migrants sought out a new and free country, laboured through a Depression to build lives for their families. A few generations ago, resilient young men went to war to fight against Nazi Germany.
 
Now, a pampered generation of men and women, many of whom don’t have much regard for democracy, seek out therapy for themselves and their children when an election result doesn’t go their way. Few things mark the worst of modernity as clearly as this rush among highly educated professionals to be victims of a democratic election on the other side of the Pacific Ocean.
 
Sayers has done nothing to show real compassion or care for his employees. If he wasn’t a laughing-stock after his firm’s intervention into the gay marriage debate, he surely is now. But, then again, maybe he’s auditioning to be the new boss of the Australian Human Rights Commission, a body devoted to turning those who are easily offended into victims.
 
Inevitably, life throws up the occasional loss, a curly challenge, a disappointing failure. If we embrace victimhood and the concomitant bastardisation of “therapy” as the means to deal with an election result, what hope do we have of dealing with the big stuff?
 
The other teachable moment from Trump’s win is that even an ocean away from the US, people who are horrified by the soft and sappy underbelly of modernity will feel more emboldened to confront and reject those people, institutions and political parties that fail to understand that resilience, not victimhood and therapy sessions, turned a handful of small British colonies into a great nation.
 
Wessexman

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Reply with quote  #74 

http://www.nationalreview.com/article/442412/donald-trump-hillary-clinton-case-prosecution-lock-her-up
Quote:

The Trump administration should pursue the case against Hillary Rodham Clinton. If there is anything more to Donald Trump than bluster, we have yet to see it. Trump has not even been sworn in as president, and he already is walking away from campaign promises that are too hard to keep, starting with his pledge to pursue the case against Hillary Rodham Clinton, who violated national-security laws, lied about it, and very likely suborned criminal acts by others, including obstruction of justice.




DavidV

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Reply with quote  #75 
http://www.news.com.au/world/europe/where-the-next-world-war-could-erupt/news-story/aabc3af37bc0630d1636ac5a0435ac6a

Forget the media's sensationalist claims of war prospects. Trump must persuade Putin to leave the Baltic states alone, since Russia has no right to rule over any of them. A balance of power needs to be maintained to prevent expansionist powers swallowing up other states as has happened in the past. I for one do not want war, but neither do we want countries like Russia, Turkey or China thinking they can take advantage of others' weakness and getting away with their expansionist dreams.
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