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Wessexman

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Reply with quote  #46 
Peter,

Yes, that is true. I have said all I wish to, and more.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #47 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter
In any case the imposition of monarchy from outside would never work, it has to be a native revolution that overthrows the present clerical tyranny if there is to be any hope for Iran's future prosperity and stability.


Well that was always my point. It is not about military intervention and never was. It is entirely in the hands of their people, as in any other country, to do so.

For me, however, what is to be lamented is the utterly cowardly way Western nations and perhaps especially Britain surrendered their power and hegemony after World War II, which opened the door to retrograde ideologies like Communism and Islamism, and much disorder and tyranny. It vindicates the view that Britain and the Empire provided unequalled good governance, liberty, security and prosperity because of the institutions established in the Commonwealth. Once those things were/are undermined, so is hope for anyone else.
Wessexman

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Reply with quote  #48 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidV


Now I'm not sure what "non-liberal universalism" means. I reject universalism and relativism outright because I believe in the supremacy of Western and especially British culture, values, traditions and institutions. This by definition is the opposite of universalism and relativism.


The non- here was meant to be modifying liberal universalism. By that I meant just multiculturalism, cosmopolitanism, and the like.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #49 
I posted this elsewhere, but now Trump says this about Asia:
http://www.news.com.au/finance/economy/world-economy/donald-trump-wants-to-increase-americas-military-force-in-the-asiapacific/news-story/ba8626542175a680e1378a34bad04ee1

With Japan dominated increasingly by right-wing hawks intent on rewriting the constitution, the timing of this seems quite impeccable.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #50 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wessexman


The non- here was meant to be modifying liberal universalism. By that I meant just multiculturalism, cosmopolitanism, and the like.


Well that sort of universalism is decidedly and increasingly illiberal in its conduct. And the greater the zeal the Left and multiculturalists have in trying to enforce their agenda, the greater the danger to our freedom and rule of law it poses. Wherever there is ideological zeal, there is always the risk of such lawlessness, and even more so when they are in charge.
Ethiomonarchist

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Reply with quote  #51 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter

I never saw any episode of The Borgias, but it seems a bit of an insult to compare the Trump camp to the historical Borgias at least. Pope Alexander VI was a much nicer and more fair-minded person than the President-elect, and a good deal more capable and intelligent than I suspect Trump will prove, though for all our sakes I hope I am wrong about that.


I'm sure the actual Borgia's were way nicer than the Trump transition team, but the fictionalized ones on the show could learn a lesson or two from these people.

CNN has made an interesting point that this turmoil maybe Trump's management style, and we may have four years of this to look forward to.

http://www.cnn.com/2016/11/16/politics/trump-transition-team-of-bitter-rivals/index.html

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The Lion of Judah hath prevailed.

Ethiopia stretches her hands unto God (Quote from Psalm 68 which served as the Imperial Motto of the Ethiopian Empire)

"God and history shall remember your judgment." (Quote from Emperor Haile Selassie I's speech to the League of Nations to plead for assistance against the Italian Invasion, 1936.)
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #52 
It is possible Trump will not be as radical as some people believe he would be. After all, Alexis Tsipras in Greece has proven more pragmatic in government than was widely imagined, even if not the best analogy.
Ethiomonarchist

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Reply with quote  #53 
Conservative pundit/show host Glenn Beck talks about Bannon, Breitbart and the Alt Right movement and the dangerous pro-Russia sentiments of the incoming administration.


http://www.cnn.com/2016/11/15/politics/glenn-beck-bannon-appointment-white-nationalists-anderson-cooper/index.html


__________________
The Lion of Judah hath prevailed.

Ethiopia stretches her hands unto God (Quote from Psalm 68 which served as the Imperial Motto of the Ethiopian Empire)

"God and history shall remember your judgment." (Quote from Emperor Haile Selassie I's speech to the League of Nations to plead for assistance against the Italian Invasion, 1936.)
Ethiomonarchist

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Reply with quote  #54 
Senator McCain's "blistering" attack on the President-Elects emerging Russia policy includes the recent allegations that Russia has attempted to manipulate U.S. Elections to engineer a Trump victory. That a senior Republican is repeating this allegation from the Clinton camp is stunning. Russia and the related areas of Eastern Europe and Syria may yet savage relations between the new President and Congressional Republicans.

http://ronpaulinstitute.org/archives/neocon-watch/2016/november/15/mccain-to-trump-dont-you-dare-make-peace-with-russia/

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The Lion of Judah hath prevailed.

Ethiopia stretches her hands unto God (Quote from Psalm 68 which served as the Imperial Motto of the Ethiopian Empire)

"God and history shall remember your judgment." (Quote from Emperor Haile Selassie I's speech to the League of Nations to plead for assistance against the Italian Invasion, 1936.)
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #55 
More talk of a "modern, gigantic" force in the Asia-Pacific region:
http://www.news.com.au/national/politics/pm-malcolm-turnbull-not-concerned-about-donald-trumps-military-plans/news-story/7dded659bacfc1c23b40f3c7414e895b
Wessexman

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Reply with quote  #56 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethiomonarchist
Senator McCain's "blistering" attack on the President-Elects emerging Russia policy includes the recent allegations that Russia has attempted to manipulate U.S. Elections to engineer a Trump victory. That a senior Republican is repeating this allegation from the Clinton camp is stunning. Russia and the related areas of Eastern Europe and Syria may yet savage relations between the new President and Congressional Republicans. http://ronpaulinstitute.org/archives/neocon-watch/2016/november/15/mccain-to-trump-dont-you-dare-make-peace-with-russia/


It will be interesting to see how Trump reacts to such attacks. In the past he has not tended to react well.






Windemere

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Reply with quote  #57 
I think Trump would do well to look into the possibility of Libertarian-type appointees for his foreign-policy type Cabinet positions, such as Secretary of State. They seem to have agendas which aren't too far from his own. I don't care at all for the Libertarian domestic policies, but I think that there is a lot of good to be said for their foreign-policy. Some of the possibilities would be Rand Paul (who ran against Trump in the primaries) and William Weld ( a veteran Republican who ran as the Libertarian vice-presidential candidate). Mitt Romney is another veteran Republican whose foreign policy agendas might be in line with Trump's.

Trump would do well to take note of the Bernie Sanders' supporters.  They had no chance of defeating the conventional Democrats, but with very, very little financial resources, they did much better than anyone expected them to. Sanders' appealled to an alienated constituency that might otherwise have stayed out of politics altogether, and succeeded in bringing them into the mainstream political milieu. They were primarily concerned with domestic economic issues, and it would behoove Trump to take their socialist agenda into consideration, though it's surely far from what he himself might like.

I wouldn't want Giuliani in a foreign-policy role, and especially not Bolton. They are too aggressive, and likely to advocate an excessive and unnecessary use of military-force, such as what happened in the ill-advised 2003 invasion of Iraq. Especially not now, considering the tension with Iran, North Korea, and the ongoing wars in Iraq and Syria. Discretion is the better part of valor. I wouldn't mind Giuliani as Attorney-General, he might do well in that position, with his law-and-order background. We are living in an age of ever-present potential domestic terrorism, and Giuliani might be an asset here. But keep him out of foreign-policy-making.

Trump's children comported themselves well during the election, as did his son-in-law, actually better than Trump did himself; although the youngest, 10-year old son, appeared to be falling asleep when Trump appeared on the platform in the middle of the night to announce his unexpected, even rather shocking,   victory; which the boy can't be blamed for, it was surely way past his bedtime. I don't mind seeing them included as advisers. Many, many politicians use nepotism to advance their families, though they do it furtively. If it's to  be done at all, it may as well be out in the open.

I suppose that the Electoral College does play a role in ensuring that large, populous states do not totally overwhelm less populous ones. But the popular vote, which Clinton indeed won,  is still vitally important to take into consideration, as does the significant percentage of the electorate who didn't vote at all. They are still citizens of the country, and they may have had valid reasons for not voting. The closeness of the popular vote demonstrates how divided the country is, and should be a warning to Trump that he needs to be cautious about whatever policies he implements. He won the Electoral College vote legally, and he is now the undoubted President. He needs to keep his pre-election promises, to whatever extent that's possible, since those promises were what got him elected.  But he needs to balance that with respecting the wishes of the significant amount of citizens who remain opposed to those policies.

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Dis Aliter Visum "Beware of martyrs and those who would die for their beliefs; for they frequently make many others die with them, often before them, sometimes instead of them."
Wessexman

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Reply with quote  #58 
Well said, I agree with you in just about everything.

Furthermore, Trump won partly by suggesting to some of the losers from globalisation that he would help them. I would think he have to deliver on this in some way, or face a backlash from these voters.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #59 
Electoral college or not, it's still a stupid system of government. Latin American nations have presidential systems without an electoral college, and it still has all the same flaws and worse. But you see, perhaps one difference is that the US shares with Britain and the Commonwealth the inheritance of English common law and respect for the rule of law that comes with it.

If the US won't fix the world's problems and it can't, then leave it to its allies. Once when Britain, France and Portugal ruled over whole parts of the world, things were certainly much safer and more certain than now. While France maintains a strong international presence in its sphere of influence, Britain cowardly retreated since World War II. Along with the fall of monarchies, this proved to be one of the biggest disasters for humanity. The fall of the Empire invariably led to the degradation of standards and the vacuum filled by retrogressive ideologies like Marxism and Islamism. The fault lies with Britain's self-hating elites and the United Nations for creating failed states.
Wessexman

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Reply with quote  #60 
Apparently, it took several of the last half dozen or so presidents four or five weeks to make all their major appointments. So a lot of the press coverage about chaotic transition may well be an exaggeration.
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