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DavidV

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Reply with quote  #16 
http://ushistoryblogsfromsam.blogspot.com/2008/09/conservatives-moderates-and-radicals.html
The political factions in the Continental Congress, and generally during the 1770s. Notice the split between Radical, Moderate and Conservative mirrored the divisions that arouse in France and Europe after 1789. Radicals being equivalent to Jacobins, Conservatives (aka Tories or Loyalists) being equivalent to Legitimists.

http://avalon.law.yale.edu/subject_menus/statech.asp
Some constitutional documents for British America. The fact that Britain granted her American colonies elected assemblies was itself more democratic than any arrangements that existed in French or Spanish colonies. In present-day Ontario and Quebec, such assemblies didn't come into being until 1791, although they had been established in Nova Scotia, PEI and New Brunswick prior. Virginia was first in 1619, followed by Bermuda the next year.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #17 
Two pieces on American Loyalists (Tories) that I dug up:

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~megardin/early.html
Silvester Gardiner was from Rhode Island, and founded the city of Gardiner, Maine. He returned to Rhode Island after the war where he died in 1786.

http://shanepinder.com/blog/2008/10/15/history-of-deveaux-plantation-cat-island-bahamas/
Andrew Deveaux, from South Carolina, was another Loyalist who helped recapture Bahamas from Spain in 1783, and returned to the USA where he died in Red Hook, New York in 1812.

These are but two examples of Loyalists who actually returned home after the war.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #18 
http://www.mountairymansion.org/history.html

The Calvert family were one of the elite families of colonial Maryland. One of its most famous members was Benedict Swingate Calvert (1724-88), who was a Loyalist during the American Revolution, but actually fared better than many of his compatriots. Unlike many, he never lost his properties and indeed, after the American Revolutionary War was over, George Washington visited and stayed at the Mount Airy mansion, as he was on cordial terms with the Calverts. He remained in Maryland until his death in 1788.

Such founders as Washington, Adams and Hamilton arguably had more in common with their opponents than today's pathetic American politicians. I won't say the same for Jefferson, obviously!

His grandson was Charles Benedict Calvert (1808-64), who was elected to Congress just at the dawn of the Civil War.
 
Spongie555

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Reply with quote  #19 
The TV show Who Do You Think You Are on TLC did a episode recently about the actress Rachel McAdams in where she learns that her family first moved to Canada because her maternal fifth great grandfather fought with the Loyalists in the Revolution. I've seen the episode and it does present the loyalists in a favorable light instead of American traitors.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Who_Do_You_Think_You_Are%3F_(U.S._TV_series)#Season_5_.282014.29

__________________
"Throughout my reign I will never rule you as a King. I will protect you as a parent, care for you as a brother and serve you as a son. I shall give you everything and keep nothing; I shall live such a life as a good human being that you may find it worthy to serve as an example for your children; I have no personal goals other than to fulfill your hopes and aspirations. I shall always serve you, day and night, in the spirit of kindness, justice and equality."

- His Majesty King Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck Coronation Address to the Nation, 6 November 2008
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