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royalcello

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Tue 30 May 2006
Shah's son urges action on Iran

POTOMAC, Maryland (Reuters) - The exiled son of Iran's late shah on Monday called on the Bush administration to put action before rhetoric in ousting Tehran's Islamic regime, which he said has long been the source of global instability.

Reza Pahlavi, 45, the eldest son of the late Mohammed Reza Pahlavi, said Iranians are ready to actively oppose the Islamic regime of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, but need more than pro-democratic utterances from world leaders like U.S. President George W. Bush.


"Fantastic, we love to hear that, motherhood and apple pie," Pahlavi said of Bush's statements that the United States supports a free, democratic Iran.

"What remains to be seen again is in what concrete way the U.S. administration will take the necessary steps," Pahlavi told Reuters in an interview at his home in a suburb of Washington, flanked by the Iranian flag and portraits of his mother and father, the U.S.-backed monarch who was deposed in the 1979 Islamic revolution.

The United States and other nations should actively support Iran's dissident groups and give them the technical gear and expertise to get their message out, Pahlavi said.

Pahlavi said regime change in Iran will leave the Middle East a safer place, and said that Iran's clerics have long been a prime mover behind violence in Iraq, Lebanon and Sudan.

"For 27 years we have seen the world sending their firetrucks to try to extinguish fires all over the planet," he said. "But nobody has asked the question 'Who is the main culprit?' ... When you come to think of it, it has been Tehran all along."

The United States and Iran are at odds over Western accusations that Iran's nuclear program is a cover for making weapons. Iran says it wants to use the enriched uranium for electricity generation.

Pahlavi, who trained in the United States as a jet fighter pilot, said Iran has the right to nuclear technology, but not to threaten other nations with it.

"It was never a question of Iran having the right -- the problem is the finger on the trigger," he said, referring to Ahmadinejad's public calls for Israel's destruction.

However, Pahlavi said the United States should not pursue military means to take away Iran's uranium-enrichment capability. Bush has said military options are on the table but has stressed the need for diplomatic talks.

Instead of a military strike, Pahlavi said global leaders should help Iran dissident groups' overthrow the current regime from within.

(c) Reuters 2006. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of Reuters content, including by caching, framing or similar means, is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Reuters. Reuters and the Reuters sphere logo are registered trademarks and trademarks of the Reuters group of companies around the world.

This article: http://news.scotsman.com/latest.cfm?id=797732006

Last updated: 30-May-06 03:24 BST

WhiteCockade

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That is the rub is it not?  The President of Iran was democratically elected as a result of U.S. aggression in the Middle East.   Look at who they elected in Iraq.  Democracy is not the key to solving problems in the Middle East but it may just be the opportunity orthodox Islamists have been looking for and yet the Jacobin in Chief continues his Wilsonian quest.  If you want a greater chance at peace spread monarchy not democracy.


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royalcello

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I sometimes wonder whether all of Reza Pahlavi's pro-"democracy" rhetoric is totally sincere, or merely a tactical strategy to gain support for the restoration of the monarchy in a political climate that venerates "democracy." I admit I kind of hope that it's the latter.
WhiteCockade

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I too hope he is not as democratically inclined as he sounds above.

    I believe that Iran is a perfect example of the weakness of democracy.  Ahmadinejad, democratically elected president of Iran, came to power as a result of an external pressure on electorate.  If he wishes to retain power democratically he must keep the elements which brought him to power.  Tension between the U.S. and Iran brought about this hardliners election.  Tension must continue in order to keep the electorate in a position of needing a “protector”.  Of course he could dissolve elections and establish a military dictatorship but this would only prove Plato correct, that all democracies degenerate into dictatorships.


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BlueEmperor

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If Crown Prince Reza were ever to be restored to the Peacock Throne, I would like to see him reign in a similar vein to the Kings of Jordan - not quite a 'constitutional monarch' in the rather flimsy European sense but not Mid-Eastern autocrat like his father either.

 

B.E.


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Daniel9

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueEmperor

If Crown Prince Reza were ever to be restored to the Peacock Throne, I would like to see him reign in a similar vein to the Kings of Jordan - not quite a 'constitutional monarch' in the rather flimsy European sense but not Mid-Eastern autocrat like his father either.

 

B.E.

 

Excellent example!  Jordan certainly has shown the strength of the monarchy in that it doesn't have to absolute, but with enough power to be effective.

Daniel9

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Here is the link for Crown Prince Reza's website: http://www.rezapahlavi.org/.

 

BlueEmperor

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That anti-monarchy feeling in US foreign policy still seems to be going strong. I personally blame the Americans for the fact that the monarchies of Afghanistan and Iraq have not (and are unlikely to be) restored.

 

B.E.


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royalcello

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Yes, I recall that there was a time when it seemed like the US might actually favor the restoration of the monarchy in Afghanistan, but nothing came of it and in the end the Bush administration ended up putting pressure on Afghanistan not to restore the monarchy. I think this may have been a case of a single article being extremely influential: the liberal columnist Michael Kinsley wrote a blistering piece in Slate about how inappropriate it would be for the US to potentially bring about the restoration of a monarchy, and it seemed like this article caught Washington's attention. This is only my theory though and I can't prove it. In any case, it's clear that American attitudes acted as an obstacle to restoration. Shameful.

I am reminded of the anecdote of when during the Clinton administration the possibility of a monarchical restoration in Serbia came up, and was abruptly dismissed by Secretary of State Madeleine Albright with, "We Don't Do Kings."
luft9989

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   You cannot blame the US for hindering restoration efforts in Iraq or Afghanistan.  Afghanistan has never been a stable country and only had a king off and on in history so it would make sense for the US to promote democracy there because it's a decent form of government and the people of Afghanistan have absolutely no nostalgic fealings about the monarchical days.  

   Iraq will never be a monarchy because the Iraqis hated the monarchy.  You see, in Iran, the people loved the Shah, but he was ousted my basically military insurgents who held the citizens of Iran at gun point.  But in Iraq, the people viewed their king as a puppet of the British Empire, which he basically was.  And they supported the movement against the monarchy.  If the US restored the monarchy there, the Iraqis would despise him and he'd be overthrown and a violent military regime would take over, just like before.  So you can't blame the US for hindering monarchical restoration. 



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That the US does not actively go around the world supporting monarchies should outrage no one -after all, the US is the preeminent republic in the world. A better question would be why the monarchies which participated in these campaigns do not have the same pride in their form of government as the US does. Iran is certainly no showcase for democracy. I'm no democrat but when all the candidates have to be chosen by the clerics before they can appear on the ballot, it's hardly a perfect example to say how horrible democracy is.

 

The fact remains that while the Taliban ruled Afghanistan and while Saddam Hussein ruled Iraq there was *zero* chance of monarchy being restored. It was a forbidden subject. Thanks to those regimes being toppled there have now been monarchist parties on the ballot in Afghanistan and Iraq for the first time since they lost their kings. The monarchist cause in both countries went from zero chance to some chance -which is progress. It is also hardly fair to say, "well, look who the Iraqis elected..." when the country is in a virtually no win scenario. The Shiites are the majority, they are buddies with Iran so naturally their winning would not be a good thing and they would be opposed by the Sunni minority and their Al-Queda allies. On the other hand, if the Sunnis intimidated their way to power the Shiites would accuse them of being a ruling elite. Could the monarchy stop all this? I doubt it, and I say that with the belief that a monarchy is best for all countries, however, I cannot imagine any country putting the old monarchy back in place and all Iraqis rushing to embrace it. Even in Afghanistan where the King was given a place of honor in the new government, his ability to overcome the divisions there seems to have been exaggerated.

 

The Middle East must be the only part of the world where monarchies were and are opposed for being too "modern" (Iran, Afghanistan or even Saudi Arabia in Osama's opinion) by building universities, letting women show some flesh and having secular law.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by luft9989

   You cannot blame the US for hindering restoration efforts in Iraq or Afghanistan.  Afghanistan has never been a stable country and only had a king off and on in history so it would make sense for the US to promote democracy there because it's a decent form of government and the people of Afghanistan have absolutely no nostalgic fealings about the monarchical days.  

   Iraq will never be a monarchy because the Iraqis hated the monarchy.  You see, in Iran, the people loved the Shah, but he was ousted my basically military insurgents who held the citizens of Iran at gun point.  But in Iraq, the people viewed their king as a puppet of the British Empire, which he basically was.  And they supported the movement against the monarchy.  If the US restored the monarchy there, the Iraqis would despise him and he'd be overthrown and a violent military regime would take over, just like before.  So you can't blame the US for hindering monarchical restoration. 

  This is, I believe, quite correct. A preferential option for monarchy were it is organic should not lead to the absurd conclusion that it is always the best solution, let alone the only solution, to a nation in turmoil. However unfortunate current U.S. policy in the Middle East appears, it is at least partly fueled by a recognition of what a disaster the House of Saud has been for the region and as a U.S. ally. You are quite right in saying that for Bush to do again what the British did in Iraq would be a disastrous mistake. I am not so sure about a restoration in Iran, I suspect most Iranians would see the Shah's son as a U.S puppet. There is a terrible problem with forcing democracy in the region as fundamentalist regimes could well result from fair and honest elections. This fear alone keeps the House of Saud in power. As to the Jordanian example, I agree with the general admiration of their royal house, but with the understanding that Jordan itself is a rather artificial construct and one which prevents a possible solution to the Palestinian question. The real problem for the region is the problem of adaptation to modernity generally in the Islamic world. The nightmare is modern technology in the hands of Islamic fundamentalists (if this is not a redundancy). There is a problem with the mentality of "We don't do Kings", but moreso with the reality that western governments and oil companies have already "done kings" and they were not a success.

  

Rosa

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I say no, because I do not want my friends to die in a foreign war. That goes for all my enemies as well.

But if they keep reaching for the Nukes like we've been seeing then we got to do something before we get inhilated.

 

What is the Shah son's personal Islamic faith? Sunni or Shi'a?

 


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hubertgaston

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Iranian Dynasties: Kadjar (1794-1925), Pahlavi (1925-1979).
History: The dynasty of Kadjar is reversed by stages. In 1921, Rezâ Khân reverses the Kadjar dynasty with the assistance of the brigade of cossacks of Hamadan made up of White Russians. A regency is constituted then, and in 1924 the regent is in his turn deposited. In November, Rezâ becomes regent in his turn, then it is on elected king by the Parliament December 12, is proclaimed emperor the following day and finally crowned in January 1926.
From 1950, Iran then will know a great period of political instability, torn between the Communists, the monks and the nationalists, the latter being directed by Mohammad Mossadegh, wire of a Kadjar princess. Ideological fermentation leads finally to the Islamic revolution of 1979, the fall of Châh and the introduction of the Islamic Republic.
Policy: One will not have had a long time for the opposition monarchist to reorganize in exile. Or to even disorganize itself, since the movements monarchists are extremely numerous. Mixed, one indeed finds the Movement National of Iranian Resistance, founded by Shahpur Bakhtiar, the last Prime Minister for Châh, the Movement Iranian Monarchist, based in Switzerland, the Constitutionnaliste Movement of Iran, directly inspired by the claimant with the throne, prince Rezâ Cyrus Pahlavi, the Face of Release of Iran, directed by the General Ali Amini, a friend of the Kennedy family, the Iranian, especially active Block among the refugees present to Great Britain, or the Alliance of the Monarchists of Iran, installed in Malmö in Sweden, which federates three small movements: Imperial Guards of Iran, the movement Our Iran and Iranian Patriotic Youths.
The activity of these groups especially consists in making propaganda within the Iranian diaspora in exile, without much contact with the Iranians "of the interior".
One can however put in the active of the Constitutionnaliste Movement of Iran the successful hacking of the waves of Iranian television and the diffusion with the antenna of a message of prince Rezâ Cyrus Pahlavi in 1986. But mobility monarchist Iranian woman also has clandestine paramilitary groups which even act as Iran.
Derafsh Kaviani (Banner of Kayivani) is probably most important numerically. Directed by a former minister for Châh, it owes its name to a Persan legendary hero who, in ancient times, would have killed a tyrant and restores the good monarch. After some terrorist activities, it definitively seems to have been folded back on a more traditional type of propaganda. The BKO, or Organization Babak Khorramdin, is much more dangerous. Posting a violent anticlericalism, it is for example responsible for the attack to the lance rockets which, in February 1993, failed to cost the life chair Rafsanjani.
Suspected of several murderous terrorist attacks, the BKO also asserted executions of several Guards of the Iranian Revolution.
Side of the dynasty of Kadjar, the things are eminently calmer. Exiled in France since 1925, they seem to aspire only to one simple historical rehabilitation around the Association of the Kadjar Family which they founded in 1999, while perhaps waiting for a political rehabilitation.
Summary: Kadjar claimant: Prince Soltan Ali Mirza. Pahlavi claimant: Prince Rezâ Cyrus Pahlavi.
hubertgaston

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Some parties, movements and Iranian monarchists groups...
In favour of the Pahlavi dynasty:
Constitutionalist Party of Iran, PO Box 18436,  ENCINO - CA the 91416 U.S.A., http://www.irancpi.org/
Organization of the Liberal Nationals Iranian Monarchists, PO Boxes 150505, D-80044 MUNCHEN DEUTCHLAND
Rastakhiz Iran (Imperial Guards of Iran), http://www.go.to/r-Iran
Constitutional Movement of Iran http://www.cmi-fl.com/
Flag of Freedom Organization of Iran (Known in his persian name: Derafshe Kaviyani) http://www.derafsh.org/
Iranian Motherland Party (Mihan Party) http://www.hezbemihan.org/
All-Iranist Party http://www.paniranist.com/
National Movement of Iranian Resistance http://impact.users.netlink.co.uk/namir/namirm.html
Iranian Monarchist Movement (KHASHM organization), 468 north Camden, DR. Suite 204, Beverley Hills CA 90210 http://www.khashm.com
In favour of the Kadjar dynasty:
International Qajar Association, PO Box 31107, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93130 U.S.A. http://www.qajarpages.org/
 
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