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DavidV

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https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-bloc-quebecois-leader-martine-ouellets-rule-is-a-tragic-shakespearean/

The decline of Quebec separatism is typified by the intransigence of Bloc Quebecois leader Martine Ouellet, who is determined to push separatism at all costs. This has alienated many BQ members with more moderate members, content with pushing for a "better deal" (whatever that is) within Canada. Hence many Bloc MPs have left the party - a far cry from its historic 1993 debut when it was the second largest party in Parliament.

https://www.thespec.com/opinion-story/8587020-bloc-qu-b-cois-has-little-credibility-as-quebec-saviour/

This year's election in Quebec could be a watershed vote on a par with 1936 (when Maurice Duplessis and the Union Nationale first won power), 1960 (when Jean Lesage led the Liberals to victory, ushering in the Quiet Revolution) and 1976 (when Rene Levesque led the Parti Quebecois to victory, followed by the 1980 referendum).
 
It could be so because Quebec could be in for a dramatic political realignment should, as many polls predict, the centre-right CAQ of Fran├žois Legault win. Legault, a former PQ member and a cultural nationalist, has said there will never be a referendum under him, and wants a stronger Quebec within Canada. This would necessarily mean a radical change to the "Quebec Model" progressive consensus that has dominated the province since the 1960s.

Opinion polls in Quebec suggest that most people don't want independence, and most believe the issue is definitively settled. This could also be because the Baby Boomer generation that led the movement is fading away.

It could also be because Quebeckers have other pressing issues - not least the migration issue as the US-Canadian border in Quebec is both an entry point and a potential flashpoint (there have been protests there). The migration issue may have fuelled increased support for the federal Conservatives in the province recently. That both the NDP and the Conservatives have representation from Quebec in the Commons is a sign of a changing political landscape.
 
There is also the issue of language, and the continued fight for civil rights for the province's Anglophone minority.
 
The collapse of the separatist dream should also be a lesson for Scotland. Support for Scottish independence may well have peaked. The only way for the SNP and their acolytes will be down. Quebec should be an ominous sign for them.
Queenslander

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Reply with quote  #2 
A "Better Canada" might result of all of this, but I am ever cautious as I have never trusted the BQ types to simply fade away completely. However this might make for a better appreciation of the Canadian Sovereign if modern Qubekkers seem satisfied with their lot.
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DavidV

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Reply with quote  #3 
Indeed, the whole point here is that Quebec's position within Canada and the Commonwealth under the Crown is to be strengthened.

The whole problem with separatism in places like Quebec, Scotland and Catalonia is that there are a very large number of people - and not just members of a minority group - who will never accept independence. It explains how Ireland turned out too.
DavidV

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http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/new-party-quebec-debout-1.4655698

The seven MPs who left Bloc Quebecois have decided to call their new party "Quebec Debout". It seems that they will not be pushing for Quebec independence but instead put Quebec interests first in Ottawa.

As I mentioned at the start, it would seem that national and global political trends have contributed to the decline of Quebec separatism. Stephen Harper's rather cautious handling of Quebec issues, since respecting provincial rights is a traditional cornerstone of Canadian conservatism, in addition to the trend towards greater Left-Right polarisation among younger people are rendering the sovereignty question increasingly irrelevant.

Which would make things tough for the new party.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #5 
Another nail in the coffin of Quebec separatism as Michel Gauthier joins the Conservatives:

https://globalnews.ca/news/4204906/former-bloc-leader-michel-gauthier-joins-conservatives/

Michel Gauthier was thrust into the Bloc Quebecois leadership when Bouchard replaced Parizeau as Quebec premier. Gauthier was seen as a moderate, but he was also an unknown both within Quebec and outside it.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #6 
The Tories historic by-election win in Quebec is not just a shock for the Liberals, it is also another nail in the coffin of Quebec separatism:
https://www.thespec.com/opinion-story/8684222-quebec-byelection-is-a-lesson-for-parties/

Martine Ouellet's resignation as BQ leader will do nothing to alleviate the party's plight, or that of the Parti Quebecois:
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-martine-ouellet-to-step-down-as-bloc-quebecois-leader/
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