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MonarchistCatherine

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As you probably know, in most of present-day Christian monarchies the monarchs begin their reign during an enthronement, proclamation, investiture or inauguration ceremonies. They swear allegiance to the Constitutions of their countries and they are oficially proclaimed. Sometimes this ceremony is looking beautifully and majestic(like in The Netherlands and Norway) and sometimes it is poor and simple(like in Denmark and Liechtenstein). Sometimes the royal regalia - crown, sceptre and orb - are displayed during the ceremony, but they are not used. The monarchs are crowned and anointed only in the UK(and, of course, the Commonwealth) and Tonga today. It seems like almost everybody had forgotten about the coronations. It's a big disgrace for the kingdoms that their Kings and Queens by the Grace of God don't get the God's blessings from an archbishop(Olav V, the King of Norway, wanted to have a blessing ceremony in 1957 because constitution abolished coronations) and the crowns are not placed on their heads. The coronation rite, connected with a Holy Mass, is an ancient tradition full of pomp and it should be restored. In some countries the coronation is not a national tradition(for example The Netherlands, where the inauguration ceremony dates from 1815 and is performed with grace, or Monaco, which is small principality). In other monarchies the sovereigns should restore the coronation. I think it is possible that the awful and stupid democratic politicians don't want their monarchs to be crowned because it symbolizes their hereditary power by the grace of God and it gives them a very special status. The politicians want to remove the monarchs' power step by step and they changed constitutions so no more coronation is required to regard the sovereign as legitimate. What do you think? Should this beautiful tradition be restored?

royalcello

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Of course it should!  I doubt anyone here would disagree.  Unfortunately we are not in charge!

I noticed that in the otherwise rather silly movie The Prince and Me, the fictional young King of Denmark has an elaborate traditional coronation with all the pomp and pageantry.  Even Hollywood knows that a king is supposed to have a coronation!

rperrin

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There is a series of films of Queen Elizabeth II's coronation on Youtube, starting with this one:



As far as Catholic countries are concerned, there is an obstacle insofar as the present-day Catholic liturgy doesn't contain a coronation rite.  The old rite, which was based on the ritual for the coronation of the Holy Roman Emperor, was contained in the Pontificale Romanum and is online here.  I have translated a few excerpts of it here.

This may be of interest in relation to the old Russian coronation ceremonies.
Peter

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Reply with quote  #4 
I of course agree that where coronation was the tradition it should be restored. However, I think it is only in Hungary that coronation was required for the sovereign to be legitimate. It is a legal requirement in Britain that the sovereign be crowned, but it doesn't alter the monarch's status in any way; they are just as much King or Queen before it as they are after, they have just fulfilled the requirement of the law, that's all.
MonarchistCatherine

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Peter

I of course agree that where coronation was the tradition it should be restored. However, I think it is only in Hungary that coronation was required for the sovereign to be legitimate. It is a legal requirement in Britain that the sovereign be crowned, but it doesn't alter the monarch's status in any way; they are just as much King or Queen before it as they are after, they have just fulfilled the requirement of the law, that's all.


Yes, this was Hungary. The Crown of St.Stephen was very important symbol for the nation and the kings of Hungary had to be physically crowned with it.

But in medieval times some monarchs crowned their heirs apparent during their own lifetime to avoid succession disputes. Coronation rite was very important and it made their legitimacy stronger. 

There was also a law requirement for the king to be crowned in Norway, but it was eliminated from the constitution in 1908 by the Parliament.

In Poland, when it was a monarchy, the kings were not allowed to exercise any of their judicial powers prior to being crowned.

 

Of course the coronation in Britain formally doesn't change the monarch's status; they start their reign and get all their power just after the death of earlier sovereign. But it gives them special status as kings/queens by the Grace of God when they are blessed by the Archbishop of Canterbury. It's very important for all Christians, especially for those who believe in Divine Right of Kings. It doesn't change their formal status, but the spiritual status.

 

BaronVonServers

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Reply with quote  #6 
It is import for those of whose of us who don't believe in the 'divine right' but rather in the 'divine duty' of the sovereign as well.  The coronation is a beautiful ceremony that reminds the people of their duty to the King/Queen and the monarch's duty under God to the people of the realm(s).

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Peter

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Poland somewhat resembled Hungary, then, in that the King could not exercise full power until crowned, though really the status of the Holy Crown was unique. There was also the Holy Roman Empire which I didn't mention. where originally the title of Emperor was not assumed until after coronation, though that later changed, coronations being dispensed with and the title assumed immediately upon election/death of predecessor if already elected and technically becoming Emperor-elect, though not much notice was taken of this.

The history of Norwegian coronations is interesting, I find. They began in the 12th century, but there was a long hiatus during the personal union with Denmark, none of the later Kings of Denmark-Norway choosing to be crowned in the latter realm. The legal requirement dated from 1814, when the present Norwegian constitution was adopted as part of a move towards independence. It was originally envisaged that the personal union with Denmark would continue, but with much more recognition of Norway's status as a separate kingdom, and no doubt the requirement for a coronation in Norway was part of that. In the event the union was with Sweden, as we all know, and of the five sovereigns of both countries two were not in fact crowned in Norway, constitution or no constitution (Carl XIII, who was in poor health from long before the union and never actually visited the country, and Oscar I who did, but was not crowned there (possibly because of the reluctance of the Bishop of Nidaros to crown his Catholic Queen). Haakon VII (below, with Queen Maud) was, the last to date and, one must sadly presume, ever.

ObedientServant

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Reply with quote  #8 

aye it shud! bein from the UK the thought of new monarchs takin t'throne without a coronation is incredibly odd to me!


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rperrin

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Here's a classic book (published in 1820) on the history of British coronations.
ObedientServant

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Reply with quote  #10 

i dont read books but if i did id have a look at it


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MonarchistCatherine

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Quote:

Originally Posted by BaronVonServers
It is import for those of whose of us who don't believe in the 'divine right' but rather in the 'divine duty' of the sovereign as well.  The coronation is a beautiful ceremony that reminds the people of their duty to the King/Queen and the monarch's duty under God to the people of the realm(s).

Thank you, Baron, it's of course very important and worth posting here. The doctrine of divine right of kings asserts that God had given the monarchs the right to rule on earth. If God gives them power, He also expects that they will carry out the royal duties. The "divine right" always comes in pair with "divine duty" or "divine responsibility".


MonarchistCatherine

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Reply with quote  #12 
Thanks for the book, rperrin! It's great!
CyrilSebastian

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Reply with quote  #13 
Here are some coronations of different monarchs.  

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