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Royalistdefender

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Reply with quote  #46 

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Originally Posted by royalcello
Met GBoleyn for drinks in Oxford tonight which was very nice, though quite brief as he had a meeting and I had to catch the bus back to Bicester.

Off to Blenheim Palace tomorrow!

     I always would love to see Blenheim Palace!

royalcello

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Reply with quote  #47 
I'm back in the US after a wonderful month in the UK.  It was a great pleasure meeting Martinus, Peter, LegitimistJacobite, and GBoleyn.  I look forward to returning to more active involvement in the forum now that I am back at my own computer, and perhaps will post more thoughts on the trip later.
royalcello

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Reply with quote  #48 
I'll post again about my upcoming return to England closer to the time of departure (July 16)--right now I still have two short domestic trips between now and then--but tonight I received the Music Lists for my choir's residencies at Canterbury Cathedral (July 18-21), St George's Chapel Windsor Castle (July 23-24), and Westminster Abbey (July 25-31).  It would be wonderful if any UK members were able to come hear us as Peter did in 2009.  Here are the schedules:

http://www.royaltymonarchy.com/links/CanterburyWindsor.pdf
http://www.royaltymonarchy.com/links/Westminster2011.pdf

Also, note that I will be in Worcester on my own for the Three Choirs Festival August 6-13, in the event that anyone is closer to there.

royalcello

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Reply with quote  #49 
I'm off to England in a few hours.  British members, please feel free to contact me anytime, especially if you are able to come to one of our choral services.
royalcello

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Reply with quote  #50 
I returned on Monday from a wonderful trip (see photos on Facebook).   It was great to meet Tolgron and BlueEmperor (see the Faces of Monarchy thread).  My blog has resumed activity (with four new posts already) now that I am back at my own computer.  While I did not miss the USA per se, after four weeks of living out of a suitcase it certainly is convenient to have one's own place and things again.  Unfortunately I had some rather discouraging conversations with British musicians about the possibility of immigration, so it remains to be seen if my theoretical allegiance will ever line up with my legal citizenship...
DutchMonarchist

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Reply with quote  #51 

You mean you couldn't move to the UK because it would be hard for you to get a job there as a musician?  

royalcello

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Reply with quote  #52 
Yes, basically, that was the gist of it.  I did meet an American-born violist who plays in the Philharmonia, but she said she got in just before the visa rules changed to make it much harder.  Also I was told that while there are American-born musicians who play in the London orchestras, in most cases they studied there first and got their foot in the door, so to speak, that way.

It's painful for me to admit it given my love of England and discontent with being American, but there are ways in which I'm better off here in Dallas.  In American orchestras, once you win an audition, you're basically set in that job, though the first two years are "probationary."  Since I'm about to start my fourth year, I have tenure and can be fairly confident in being able to keep this job for as long as I want it and perform adequately.  In Britain, once you win an audition, you have to have a "trial" period which can last for up to a year in which you sit with every member of the section and it's like auditioning all over again every day, to make sure you fit in well with the orchestra, before you're officially a member.  But even then, there is no tenure: there is no guarantee that you will keep being hired.  In American orchestras, we have a guaranteed annual salary, and not only paid vacation, but even when we're not on vacation, there is a system of rotation (every musician does not play every piece on every concert) meaning that occasionally we essentially get paid for doing nothing.  In British orchestras, it doesn't work that way: there's no annual salary, and if you don't play, you don't get paid.  Now the result of that in London is extremely high standards of performance (it is easy for string players in the back of the sections of American orchestras to get a bit lazy) but it can be very stressful for the musicians; they have to work much harder than we do in order to be able to afford to live in one of the most expensive cities in the world.  (A "service" is either a rehearsal or a concert, normally 2-2.5 hours; American orchestral musicians generally work no more than two services a day, albeit with "free" time presumably spent teaching or practicing, but three services a day is standard for London musicians.)  This is also one reason why the London Symphony do so many film scores (you have almost certainly heard them in movie soundtracks); they're frankly cheaper to hire than American orchestras since they don't earn as much.   In Worcester I heard the Philharmonia present seven completely different classical concerts in eight days, all of them outstanding and including some obscure and difficult repertoire; no American orchestra does that.  (We generally perform one program a week and repeat it several times.)

Now theoretically all that would be worth it if I could be British, but the practical obstacles (immigration, transportation, etc.) are considerable.  Too bad there's no fast-track exception for die-hard monarchists of partially British ancestry who can recite all the monarchs of England since 1042 and the dates of their reigns from memory...
Ponocrates

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Reply with quote  #53 
Staying in Dallas makes complete sense for you - if you can handle the heat!   Friends in Austin have said that the weather has been atrocious this summer.    Besides paid vacation, you are able to visit many interesting places while working, which occasionally brings you back to Britain.   Maybe it's a place that's better to visit.

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DutchMonarchist

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Reply with quote  #54 

Interesting - is this system of Dallas the standard in the US? Because I always had this image in my mind that all artists had to work more in America than in Europe, but maybe that was just my prejudice.

royalcello

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Reply with quote  #55 
Yes, Dallas is a fairly representative example of a full-time American orchestra.  Even in Charlotte, which did not pay as well and employed us only 38 weeks of the year, we had salaries, tenure, and rotation. 

The situations in the UK and on the Continent are totally different.  Continental European orchestral musicians are probably better off than British orchestral musicians and I think earn incomes more comparable to those of American orchestral musicians, though European orchestras rely more on state support while American orchestras rely more on private support.  I have heard that the problem in the UK is that they do not have either the high levels of state support that Continental orchestras do or the substantial tradition of private giving that the US has, so it's like the worst of both worlds in terms of funding.  Plus London has so many first-rate professional orchestras, probably more than any other city in the world; it's not like Berlin, Vienna, Amsterdam, or American cities where there is one leading orchestra, so it's arguably a surplus, more than the London market can really support--which is why they do so much touring.  London orchestral musicians are constantly traveling, both throughout the UK (e.g. the Philharmonia in Worcester where I heard them) and abroad.

Another important difference between the UK and the continent is that in England, the national musical life seems to be highly centralized in London (and Scotland's in Edinburgh and Wales's in Cardiff) and there really aren't a lot of opportunities for full-time orchestral work outside the capital(s) other than Birmingham, that I know of.   Whereas especially in Germany (in what monarchists might like to view as a remnant of the days of the Holy Roman Empire when princes had their own court orchestras), but in other European countries as well, and obviously in the US, there are many more opportunities for full-time musical careers away from the capital.  (English organists and male singers, of course, do have plenty of options away from London what with all the cathedrals, though I think lay clerks generally have to hold other jobs.)

I would say that American musicians who do not get a full-time orchestra job can have as challenging an existence as British ones, but for those of us who do, it's probably a more comfortable career than our British colleagues have...provided that our orchestras remain in stable financial condition, which recently has not been the case with many US orchestras, even major ones, so it will be...interesting to see what the future holds.

jovan66102

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Reply with quote  #56 
Quote:
Originally Posted by royalcello


Now theoretically all that would be worth it if I could be British, but the practical obstacles (immigration, transportation, etc.) are considerable.  Too bad there's no fast-track exception for die-hard monarchists of partially British ancestry who can recite all the monarchs of England since 1042 and the dates of their reigns from memory...


Too bad one of your parents wasn't born there. I plan on taking out UK citizenship soon, based on my mother and the 'gender neutralising' of the law they did a few years ago.

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'Monarchy can easily be ‘debunked;' but watch the faces, mark the accents of the debunkers. These are the men whose tap-root in Eden has been cut: whom no rumour of the polyphony, the dance, can reach - men to whom pebbles laid in a row are more beautiful than an arch. Yet even if they desire equality, they cannot reach it. Where men are forbidden to honour a king they honour millionaires, athletes or film-stars instead: even famous prostitutes or gangsters. For spiritual nature, like bodily nature, will be served; deny it food and it will gobble poison.' C.S. Lewis God save Her Majesty Elizabeth the Second, by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom, Canada and Her other Realms and Territories Queen, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith, etc.! Vive le Très haut, très puissant et très excellent Prince, Louis XX, Par la grâce de Dieu, Roi de France et de Navarre, Roi Très-chrétien!
royalcello

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Reply with quote  #57 
Do you know if it would give me any advantage in Canada that my late grandmother (1921-2010) was born there (Oshawa, ON)?
jovan66102

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Reply with quote  #58 
Quote:
Originally Posted by royalcello
Do you know if it would give me any advantage in Canada that my late grandmother (1921-2010) was born there (Oshawa, ON)?


Unfortunately, not anymore. At one time an immediate ancestor born in Canada or Britain was a big help, but they changed the law, probably to keep the Aussies and the Kiwis out. (Just kidding!)

On a side, personal, genealogical note, I recently discovered that my great-great-grandfather, who I always thought was of old English Boston stock, was actually an immigrant from pre-Confederation Nova Scotia.

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'Monarchy can easily be ‘debunked;' but watch the faces, mark the accents of the debunkers. These are the men whose tap-root in Eden has been cut: whom no rumour of the polyphony, the dance, can reach - men to whom pebbles laid in a row are more beautiful than an arch. Yet even if they desire equality, they cannot reach it. Where men are forbidden to honour a king they honour millionaires, athletes or film-stars instead: even famous prostitutes or gangsters. For spiritual nature, like bodily nature, will be served; deny it food and it will gobble poison.' C.S. Lewis God save Her Majesty Elizabeth the Second, by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom, Canada and Her other Realms and Territories Queen, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith, etc.! Vive le Très haut, très puissant et très excellent Prince, Louis XX, Par la grâce de Dieu, Roi de France et de Navarre, Roi Très-chrétien!
royalcello

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Reply with quote  #59 
As posted on my blog with itinerary, I'm off to Europe tomorrow. I probably won't be very active at the forum during the next four weeks. I hope everyone behaves themselves! [wink]
Peter

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Reply with quote  #60 
So, how was this year's trip?
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