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Reply with quote  #31 

IMNSHO Haiti is by all rights the property of the King of France and no one else. BTW, the "white king of La Gonave" if I am not mistaken was a US Marine. A friend of mine (another monarchist) told me about it long ago, if I remember correctly he had Faustin in his name or something and the local curandera or whatever thought this was a sign from the gods and made him king during his tour there.

IIMH

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Reply with quote  #32 
UN: More traditional leadership in Africa
http://imperialhaiti.blogspot.com/

The Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) was established by the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) of the United Nations (UN) in 1958 as one of the UN's five regional commissions. ECA's mandate is to promote the economic and social development of its member States, foster intra-regional integration, and promote international cooperation for Africa's development.

In 2007, ECA published a very important rapport named Relevance of African Traditional Institutions of Governance. The main facts and observations contained are:
- Invented chieftaincies unsuccessful: in colonial and post-colonial States, chieftaincies imposed, as opposed to chieftaincies traditionally selected by the people, have been largely unsuccessful as they subverted traditional political values;
- Continuity and stability: despite efforts of the post-colonial States to abolish the colonial system of indirect rule and to strip chiefs of most of their authority or to abolish their office, chieftaincy has continued to operate remarkably well in rural areas, as custodians of customary law and communal assets, dispensing justice, resolving conflicts and enforcing contracts;
- Local governance: chieftaincy can be translated into better governance since chiefs serve as custodians of and advocates for the interests of local communities within the broader political structure (i.e. the State, the province ...);
- Collective raison d'être: the conception of traditional institutions that the source and raison d'être of power is the collective good of all members of society, provides a strong philosophical basis for establishing accountable governance;
- Efficiency: over-centralization of power in post-colonial States often obfuscates cpmmunity-based initiatives and democratic practices at the grassroots while only the articulation of indigenous political values and practices can provide good governance through harmonization with modern democratic practices;
- Checks and balances: chieftaincy is accompanied by mechanisms of checks and balances, resulting at the lower levels in chiefs exercising little power beyond presiding over community meetings, where decisions are largely made in a consensual manner;
- No human right violations: in the case of chiefs who submitted to the colonial or post-colonial State, it is not clear if their collaboration with the State worsened or ameliorated the conditions of their communities; chiefs have often presented to district heads the argument that their people would not accept certain measures, and in order to maintain law and order, the district heads often supported the chiefs; f.ex. the South African chiefs under the apartheid system, have never been recorded in the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission as being engaged in or accused of committing gross human right violations during this period; if chiefs betrayed their responsibility to their communities by collaborating with the State, then the State would be at the centre of the problem;
- Adherence: why would the populations under chieftaincy choose to continue to adhere to the traditional institution if chiefs did not command any accountability or if they treated the population as subjects with no rights;
- Ethnic conflicts: chiefs have the potential to mitigate ethnic conflicts by applying traditional conflict-resolution mechanisms to narrow differences;
- Public service delivery: public service delivery in rural areas has been smoother in areas where government structures have had good relations with traditional leaders;
- Political raison d'être: in a democratic environment where the population exercises control over the activities of the State, the demands that the latter places upon chiefs can be expected to coincide largely with those of the communities; the people can easily vote with their feet by abandoning chieftaincy and embracing the institutions of the State; the State can also easily bypass or dismiss chiefs who lose legitimacy;
- Democratic values: political values in traditional institutions are the same as values highly praised or re-discovered in western democracies i.e. decentralization of power, direct participation in decision-making, resolution of conflicts by narrowing differences, respect for dissent and protection of minority views and interests by requiring consensus on decisions (as compared with State electoral mechanisms where people may vote along ethnic lines); narrowing the gap between the rulers and the ruled through direct participation of all adult males in making and in enforcing rules; equitable access to land, mostly by the communal land tenure system; therefore, the incorporation of African traditional political values into the modern values of governance of the post-colonial State constitutes the critical step in the reconstitution of the African State, too often perceived to be an apparatus of exploitation and oppression;
- Upper houses: the most common form of integration of chiefs into the modern system of governance has been the creation of an upper house or house of chiefs in parliament, with a largely advisory rôle: more of these upper houses of chiefs can be found in the sections of Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, South Africa, Zambia, Zimbabwe; they are all inspired by the British upper house system.
KYMonarchist

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Reply with quote  #33 
That post needs to have its own thread on the Asia and Africa section of the forum. We shall have a grand discussion about it!

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IIMH

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Reply with quote  #34 
http://www.allstates-flag.com/fotw/images/h/ht-1849.gif

The Haitian Constitution of 1843 confirmed the horizontal blue and red flag (article 192) and it was confirmed in subsequent constitutions. An attempt to restore the black and red flag which was made in 1844 failed. In 1847 Faustin Soulouque was elected president and in 1849 he proclaimed himself emperor under the name of Faustin I (1849-59). The blue-red flag was confirmed in the 1849 constitution but the shield was modified. Faustin's Empire ended on 15 January 1859. No change was made in the flag but the previous arms were restored.
Pragmatist

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Reply with quote  #35 
How about this flag:




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panafricanforum

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Reply with quote  #36 

Due to the political climate in Haiti do you think the Haitian monarchy can return,and rule as a constitutional monarchy?


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MozartBoy

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Reply with quote  #37 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pragmatist
How about this flag:





should there be a link?

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Pragmatist

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Reply with quote  #38 

It was the French tricolor as I recall.


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beronessyoldie

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Reply with quote  #39 
Quote:
Originally Posted by IIMH
The Institut de la Maison Imperiale d'Haiti believes that both history and contemporary experience prove that Monarchy has been, is, and will continue to be of inestimable value in establishing and maintaining stability, welfare and dignity of all countries. In Spain, for example, the restoration of the Monarchy ensured a tranquil transition to democracy, and the people of many other countries see a return to Constitutional Monarchy as their way forward to establishing the free society that has been denied under extreme regimes of the Left or Right. The world’s most stable nations are Monarchies. The constancy and political impartiality inherent in a soundly based Monarchy secures for its people freedom from civil or military dictatorship and ensures a genuine concern for the welfare of the entire community. A monarch stands above politics, not owing allegiance to any political party or group, and not beholden to any business interest which might fund a presidential campaign. A monarch is able to unite a nation by representing all races, creeds, classes and political beliefs, because a monarch does not have to curry favour for votes from any section of the community. A monarch is invariably more widely popular than an Executive President, who can be elected by less than 50% of the electorate and may therefore represent less than half of the people. Elected presidents are concerned more with their own political futures and power. Monarchs are not subject to the influences which corrupt short-term presidents. A monarch looks back on centuries of history and forward to the well-being of the entire nation under his heir. By retaining certain constitutional powers, or at least denying them to others, a monarch is the safeguard against civil or military dictatorship. Sir Winston Churchill said that had the Kaiser still been German Head of State after 1918, Hitler could not have come to power, or at least not remained there. In Italy, when in 1943 he had the opportunity to do so, King Victor Emmanuel removed Mussolini from office. Romania’s King Michael dismissed the dictator Antonescu and transferred his country from Axis to the Allies, for which he was decorated by the Great Powers, and in Bulgaria King Boris III (although obliged to enter the war on the side of the Axis), bravely refused to persecute Bulgarian Jews and would not commit his forces outside his country’s borders. As we have seen in Spain and Thailand, monarchs have succeeded in defending democracy against the threat of permanent military take-over. Even Royal Families which are not reigning are dedicated to the service of their people, and continue to be regarded as the symbol of the nation. Prominent examples are H.R.H. the Duke of Braganza in Portugal and H.R.H. the Count of Paris in France. Royal Families forced to live in exile are often promoters of charities formed to help their countries. (Source: International Monarchist League).

Haiti is the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere because of her history, her present social structures which grew out of her history and because she is caught in the impossible competition of modern economics.

Haiti needs the help of goodwilled people everywhere. Monarchy can provide the avenue for stability. We therefore believe that Haiti will profit from becoming a monarchy.

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beronessyoldie

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Reply with quote  #40 
Yes! It will be better for Haiti! Prince Thierry will be perfect monarchy.

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