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BaronVonServers

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Reply with quote  #1 
Please listen and let me know what this is saying......

Thanks!

http://b5.cs.uwyo.edu/bab5/snds/beauty.wav



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Peter

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Reply with quote  #2 
I asked a Latinist friend to give it a go, but he said that "between the protracted melismas and the echo" he couldn't catch enough words to identify what was being sung. Sorry, but at least I did try for you, or rather get someone else to.
BaronVonServers

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks!

It is supposed to be a Neo-Gregorian Chant on Beauty....But I couldn't catch enough to figure out if it were a 'paraphrase' of a psalm, or just 'made up sounds'....


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NeasOlc

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Reply with quote  #4 
I did some simple detective work and some googling. Someone else on the internet posed the same question and some other random person gave the following lyrics. Upon re-listening to the audio while looking at the lyrics I can confirm that this matches up.

Puer natus est nobis et filius datus est nobis;
cujus imperium super humerum ejus;
et vocabitur nomen ejus,
consilii Angelus.

Cantate Domino canticum novum;
quia mirabilia fecit.

-
A boy is born to us and a son is given to us
Whose empire is on his shoulders
And his name will be called
The Angel of Council [???]

Sing to the lord a new song
For he has done marvellous things

(Translation I did myself- I'm currently studying medieval latin- though I'm not sure what they're talking about with the whole "Consilii Angelus" thing)
Ponocrates

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Reply with quote  #5 
Yes, NeasOlc identified this properly.   "Consilii Angelus" can be taken as "counsel" not "council."

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BaronVonServers

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Reply with quote  #6 
Thank you, thank you!

Angelic Counselor (if its really based on Isaiah 9:6, and Pslam 98:1) would probably be the 'lose translation' and the Neo-Gregorain is a back translation from English or some other 'later language'....

Again, Thanks!

(King James)
For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given:
and the government shall be upon his shoulder:
and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor,

Sing to the LORD a new song,
for he has done marvelous things


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Peter

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Reply with quote  #7 
Well done on that, NeasOlc. Apparently the text was first set by William Byrd, whom royalcello would no doubt be able to tell us all about. Here is a linked You Tube Gregorian Chant performance, and the full Latin text of Puer natus est nobis:

Puer natus est nobis
Et filius datus est nobis
Cuius imperium super humerum eius
Et vocabitur nomen eius
Magni consilii Angelus
Cantate Domino canticum novum
Quia mirabilia fecit
Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto
Sicut erat in principio, et nunc, et semper,
in secula seculorum. Amen.
BaronVonServers

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Reply with quote  #8 
Ah, thanks again and again.

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Riese35

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Reply with quote  #9 
This is not a Neo-Gregorian Chant on Beauty. It is the Introitus of the third mass of christmas day "In die" in the Roman rite as celebrated in roman-catholic churches where the Roman rite is celebrated (most catholic churches in western Europe and America). The text and tones are codified in the Missale Romanum, Graduale, or Liber Usualis which defines the Holy Mass together with all texts that are said and tones that are sung for every day (sunday) of the church year. It is all over the world the same if the Roman rite is celebrated.

The Introitus always consists of an Antiphon, a Psalm verse, a "Gloria patri" (most days of the year, omitted the two sundays before easter = "Dominicae Passionis"), and a repetition of the Antiphon.

Antiphon and Psalm verse are different depending on the day, and on christmas day even different in the first mass "In nocte" at midnight (Dominus dixit ad me: Filius meus es tu, ego hodie genui te.), in the second mass "In aurora" when the sun rises (Lux fulgebit hodie super nos, quia natus est nobis Dominus et vocabitur Admirabilis, Deus, Princeps pacis, Pater futuri saeculi, cujus regni non erit finis.) and in the thrid mass "In die" during the day:

Antiphon:
Puer natus est nobis et filius datus est nobis,
cujus imperium super humerum ejus,
et vocabitur nomen eius magni consilii Angelus.

Psalm verse:
Cantate Domino canticum novum, quia mirabilia fecit.
Gloria patri:
Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto
sicut erat in principio, et nunc, et semper,
et in secula seculorum. Amen.
Repetition of the Antiphon:
Puer natus est nobis et filius datus est nobis,
cujus imperium super humerum ejus,
et vocabitur nomen eius magni consilii Angelus.
The tones of the Antiphon are more complex and special to the Antiphon, whereas the Psalm verse and Gloria patri uses one of the standard 8 Gregorian tones of the Psalms, consisting of Intonatio, Tenor (et Flexa), Mediatio, and then again Tenor and Terminatio.

After singing the Introitus, the Schola sings the "Kyrie eleison", and then most sundays of the year (exception during Adventus and Quadragesima) the "Gloria in excelsis Deo".
Ninastar1

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Reply with quote  #10 
I have never heard this prayer. 
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