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DavidV

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http://www.radioaustralia.net.au/international/radio/program/pacific-beat/the-kingdom-of-hawaii-to-be-or-not-to-be/1314170

Well, Hawaii did exist as a Kingdom and it was unjustly annexed by the USA. Interesting discussion.
Tolgron

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I really do not expect this to lead to the eventual independence of the Hawaiian kingdom (simply because it's been a US state for too long), but it really is a fascinating and somewhat exciting question. I'm really curious to see how this develops.
Windemere

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The only problem is, as far as I know, the Hawaiian royal family descended from King Kamehameha I (who founded the kingdom), is completely extinct in both agnatic and cognatic branches.Any claimant would therefore have to come from a collateral branch descended from a forebear of King Kamehameha. The last 3 Hawaiian monarchs, although not descendants of Kamehameha, did evidently have such a descent. The last 2 of these monarchs ( a brother, followed by his sister) came from the House of Kalakaua, which also left no descendants. The Hawaiian nobility predated the founding of the kingdom, and there are surely lines descended from cousins that are still extant. But there appear to be no direct descendants at all of any of the actual Hawaiian monarchs.
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KYMonarchist

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Windemere
The only problem is, as far as I know, the Hawaiian royal family descended from King Kamehameha I (who founded the kingdom), is completely extinct in both agnatic and cognatic branches.Any claimant would therefore have to come from a collateral branch descended from a forebear of King Kamehameha. The last 3 Hawaiian monarchs, although not descendants of Kamehameha, did evidently have such a descent. The last 2 of these monarchs ( a brother, followed by his sister) came from the House of Kalakaua, which also left no descendants. The Hawaiian nobility predated the founding of the kingdom, and there are surely lines descended from cousins that are still extant. But there appear to be no direct descendants at all of any of the actual Hawaiian monarchs.


Uh, Windemere, the current claimant to the Hawaiian throne is Quentin Kuhio Kawananakoa of the House of Kawananakoa. This is on Wikipedia.
Windemere

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Thank you for the reference to Quentin Kawananakoa. The genealogy of the Hawaiian royalty is fascinating, but is no easy task to decipher.

The last 2 Hawaiian monarchs were King David Kalakaua and his sister, Queen Regnant Liliuokalani. Quentin apparently traces his paternal  cognatic ancestry back to David Kawananakoa , who was their first cousin. David Kawananakoa's grandmother was the aunt of King Kalakaua and Queen Liliuokalani (who constituted the House of Kalakaua). Thus Quentin is the senior and  closest living relative of the House of Kalakaua. Quentin's paternal line also evidently includes a descent from a half-uncle of King Kamehameha I (founder of the united Hawaiian kingdom).

Quentin's maternal cognatic  ancestry is also apparently traceable to an uncle (or half-uncle) of Kamehameha I.

One of Kamehameha I's half-brothers also established a cognatic lineage that's endured down to the present time. Unlike the Kawananakoa family, who maintained their Kawananakoa surname even through the female line, this lineage has followed the conventional American practice of a wife adopting her husband's surname, and so their surname has changed several times, due to female descent. I think that a Hawaiian woman by the name of Owana Salazar is the present representative of that lineage.

The houses of Kamehameha and Kalakaua seem to have shared a common ancestor in Chief Keawe II, who lived around 1665 thru 1754, and who ruled the big island of Hawaii. That was before the establishment of the unified Hawaiian kingdom by Kamehameha I in 1795. Keawe II had children with multiple wives, including one who was his half-sister (they shared the same mother).

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