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CyrilSebastian

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Reply with quote  #1 
In 1396 King Richard II of England persuaded Pope Boniface XI to issue a bull confirming John of Gaunt's marriage to Katherine Swynford and the legitimacy of the Beauforts.
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Laszlo Gere
CyrilSebastian

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Reply with quote  #2 
King Richard II developed elaborateness on court protocol. He insisted on new forms of address such as "Your Highness" and "Your Majesty".
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Laszlo Gere
Peter

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Reply with quote  #3 
As far as I know, the first recorded use of 'Majesty' as a style of address was by the Emperor Charles V in 1519, it then being almost immediately adopted by Europe's kings of the day. This of course was more than a century after the overthrow and death of Richard II, so please provide a source for your assertion that he used the style. I don't know when the first use of 'Highness' was, but suspect that it conversely was from well before Richard II's day. There was by no means the consistency in use of styles then that we expect today, a monarch as august and also frankly terrifying as Henry VIII could be and was addressed as 'Majesty' (which I believe he was the first English king to be), 'Highness' and 'Grace' all in the same sentence, by way of variation, with no disrespect intended or perceived, and the same with his successors up to James I. Under him the exclusive use of 'Majesty' became the custom, as it remains today.
CyrilSebastian

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Reply with quote  #4 
Richard II, according to Robert Lacey in Great Tales From English History, was the first English sovereign to demand the title of Highness or Majesty.
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Laszlo Gere
Peter

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Reply with quote  #5 
The latter is possible. I have seen it said that the use of 'Highness' for English Kings dates from the 12th century, but certainly in such documents as I've seen from before Richard II's time 'Grace' seems far more usual. 'Majesty' though I don't recall ever seeing for any subsequent king prior to Henry VIII, and these things never go backwards. If Richard II had ever used the style then it is as certain as anything could be that his successors all would too. So I doubt Mr Lacey's accuracy on that point. It is true more generally that Richard II had an elevated idea of kingship and the ceremony that ought to surround it, and title inflation would fit with that, though I am yet to be convinced that it actually occurred as described.
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