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royalcello

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Reply with quote  #1 
                                                       
                                                                                                                                                                                                       
                       
                                King Taufa'ahau Tupou IV                                
King Taufa'ahau has been suffering from an unspecified illness
                       
                       
                                The King of Tonga, Taufa'ahau Tupou IV, has died in a New Zealand hospital at the age of 88 after a long illness, according to government sources.

King Tupou IV was absolute ruler of the South Pacific island nation for 41 years, making him the world's fourth longest serving monarch.

Correspondents say he was much loved by his people, but his death is likely to fuel calls for greater democracy.

He will be succeeded by his son, 57-year-old Crown Prince Tupouto'a.

Much of the king's power had already passed to his son in recent years as he battled ill health.

Heaviest monarch

King Tupou's death was reported late on Sunday at Auckland's Mercy Hospital, where he had been receiving treatment since April.

A formal announcement is expected from the Lord Chamberlain, Fielakepa, on Monday.

King Tupou took over the monarchy after the death of his mother, Queen Salote, in 1965 and began modernising the archipelago's education system and infrastructure.

He became famous as the world's heaviest monarch, at over 200 kg (440 lb), but in the 1990s headed a national keep fit campaign and shed a third of his weight.

Correspondents say in later years the king became increasingly eccentric and isolated, getting involved in a series of failed business ventures.

His autocratic tendencies prompted pro-democracy demonstrations two years ago attended by almost 10% of the country's population.                                                        


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While he was probably a Free Wesleyan, I will assume he died in invincible ignorance and say, "May he rest in peace and may light perpetual shine upon him."

 

Let us pray.
Incline thine ear, O Lord, unto the prayers whereby we humbly call upon thee to shew mercy unto the soul of thy servant, Tâufaʻâhau, which it hath pleased thee to call out of this world, that it may please thee also to set him in the abode of peace and light, and make partaker of the fellowship of thine elect.  Through.

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Amen.


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More from the BBC

 

Tongan King Tupou IV dies aged 88
King Taufa'ahau Tupou IV
King Taufa'ahau had been suffering from an unspecified illness
The people of Tonga have been plunged into mourning following the death of 88-year-old King Taufa'ahau Tupou IV.

Public buildings are being draped in black and purple as a mark of respect.

King Tupou IV was absolute ruler of the South Pacific island nation for 41 years, making him the world's fourth longest-serving monarch.

His son, Crown Prince Tupouto'a, was sworn in as the new king at a brief ceremony on Monday, but it could be at least a year before a full coronation.

Correspondents say King Tupou IV was much loved by his people, but his death is likely to fuel calls for greater democracy.

King Tupou's death was reported late on Sunday at Auckland's Mercy Hospital, where he had been receiving treatment since April.

The Tongan government made a formal announcement shortly afterwards. "The sun has set in the kingdom of Tonga," it said in a statement.

The king's body will remain in Auckland until Wednesday, before being moved back to Tonga to lie in state.

Mourning has already begun and is expected to last up to a year.

Heaviest monarch

King Tupou took over the monarchy in 1965, after the death of his mother, Queen Salote, and soon began modernising the archipelago's education system and infrastructure.

Map of Tonga
Throughout his reign, the royal family controlled Tonga's semi-feudal political system and most of the economy, which is dependent upon farming, fishing and remittances from expatriate Tongans.

The king made headlines around the world in the 1970s, when he became the world's heaviest monarch at over 200 kg (440 lb).

But in the 1990s he headed a national keep fit campaign and shed a third of his weight.

For most of his reign, King Tupou had the respect and loyalty of his subjects and other leaders in the South Pacific.

But in recent years, he has faced increasing dissent.

In 2005, thousands of people took to the streets to demand democracy and public ownership of key assets, in unprecedented public demonstrations.

South Pacific analysts say the king's death is likely to fuel demands for greater liberalisation in Tonga.

The king's death is the second blow to the Tongan royal family and the Tongan people in recent months.

The kingdom has only recently mourned the death of one of the king's sons who, along with his wife, was killed in a car crash in San Francisco in July.




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And a much lengthier obituary from The Telegraph.



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From The New Zealand Herald, published in Auckland, NZ where HM died.
 
 

King Taufa'ahau Tupou IV
King Taufa'ahau Tupou IV
 
 
King's body to lie in state
 
UPDATED 2.40pm Monday September 11, 2006
 
The body of Tonga's king, the fourth-longest reigning monarch in the world, will lie in state in Auckland tomorrow before being flown to his island home on Wednesday.
 
Crown Prince Tupouto'a has already been sworn in as king after the death of King Taufa'ahau Tupou IV, aged 88.
 
But a full coronation for Tonga's new king could be at least a year away, said the Lord Chamberlain, the Honourable Noble Fielakepa.
 
Until then "he will be effectively the King," he said.
 
An official period of mourning has begun in the islands which awoke this morning to news of the king's death broadcast on Radio Tonga.
 
The body of the king, a towering but conservative presence in his kingdom who opposed moves to democracy, will lie in state in his residence in Auckland, Atalanga, on Tuesday then be returned to Tonga on Wednesday.
 
The Tongan government confirmed the King died at 11.34pm last night in Auckland's Mercy Hospital where he had been receiving treatment for significant periods over the last year.
 
He was in no pain and yesterday, a few hours before he died, he was conscious and talking to family members, said a statement.
 
Details of the state funeral were yet to finalised.
 
"He will be lying in state and then have a state funeral but as for timing in Nuku'alofa, I believe the government will want to give time for overseas dignitaries who may want to pay their respects," the Lord Chamberlain said.
 
"We are getting a lot of messages of condolences from overseas governments and from the people of many countries.
 
Wheelchair-bound King Tupou suffered from heart problems and had been receiving long-term medical care in Auckland. He was well enough to return to Tonga for celebrations of his 88th birthday in early July, before returning to an Auckland hospital.
 
Prime Minister Helen Clark said her thoughts were with the king's family and the people of Tonga.
 
"The king was very much loved in Tonga and I know there will be huge ceremonies back there when the king's body arrives home. So our thoughts are with all of them at this time," she said.
 
The death of the king would leave a "huge gap" in Tongan society, said Melino Maka, the chairman of the Tongan Advisory Council in New Zealand.
 
"He was held not only with respect but he was much loved. He was the founder of modern Tonga," Mr Maka said.
 
"[King Tupou] has transformed Tonga from a village-based economy to a regional and international trade economy."
 
Mr Maka said the king died with his daughter at his side.
 
King Taufa'ahau Tupou IV came to power in 1965 after his mother, Queen Salote, died of cancer.
 
King Tupou is married to Queen Halaevalu Mata'aho Ahome'e, 80. The couple have four children.
 
As the king's health deteriorated in recent times, his eldest son and heir, Crown Prince Tupouto'a, has become the power behind the throne.
 
The Tongan royal family only just ended 10 days of mourning in early August after one of the king's sons was killed, along with his princess wife, in a car crash in San Francisco in July.
 
Tonga is the South Pacific's last monarchy, where the royal family controls a semi-feudal political system.
 
King Tupou IV has ruled the group of 170 coral islands, sprinkled over the South Pacific about 2000km north of New Zealand, since 1965.
 
The king made international headlines in 1976 when he became the world's heaviest monarch, tipping the Tonga airport scales, the only scales in the country that could hold him, at 209 kg. Obesity is a major problem in the island kingdom.
 
The Guiness World Records says the king was reported to have slimmed down to 139kg by 1985. By 1998 he had lost further weight.
 
Tongan politics, strongly in the hands of the royal family, has been challenged in recent years by a pro-democracy movement. Some liberalisation has occurred. The country, beset by poverty, has faced unrest, fuelled by dissatisfaction with the monarchial rule and the widening gulf between the haves and have-nots. In May 2005 an estimated 10,000 people took to the streets to demand democracy and public ownership of key assets.
 
The economy depends on subsistence farming, tourism and fishing as well as remittances from Tongans living abroad, mainly in New Zealand, Australia and the US.
 
- NZHERALD STAFF, NZPA
 
Links
  •  A colourful monarch
  •  Leaders pay tribute
  •  Readers' tributes

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it is always shocking to hear of not only a monarch's death, but the death of a great ruler and king. He was a shining example of how absolute monarchy can work.


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The King Goes Home!

 

 

Princess Pilolevu Tuita and other members of the Tongan royal household will observe a six-month mourning period for King Taufa'ahau Tupou IV. Picture / Kenny Rodger
Princess Pilolevu Tuita and other members of the Tongan royal household will observe a six-month mourning period for King Taufa'ahau Tupou IV. Picture / Kenny Rodger
 
New Zealand bids final farewell to King of Tonga
 
Wednesday September 13, 2006
By Maggie McNaughton
 
Mourners trickled in steadily yesterday to pay their final respects to the late King of Tonga, who was lying in state at the Tongan royal residence, Atalanga, in Epsom.
 
King Taufa'ahau Tupou IV, who ruled Tonga for 41 years, died late on Sunday night at Auckland's Mercy Hospital after a long illness. He was 88.
 
His body lay inside Atalanga's main building, guarded by two members of the Tongan Defence Force. The gates outside the residence were heavily guarded by police and security guards.
 
The king's body will be taken to the Air Force base at Whenuapai today and flown back to Tonga in a Hercules aircraft, accompanied by members of the Tongan royal family. The aircraft is due to take off at 10.30am.
 
A state funeral will be held in Tonga on Tuesday. After the burial, Tonga will observe a one-month mourning period. The royal court will be in mourning for six months.
 
Tongan-born Ana Edwards, who has lived in Auckland for 46 years, said the late king was a great man and had done a lot for his people.
 
"I came here to pay my last respects. I am really deeply sorry that he has passed, but that's life," the 76-year-old chairwoman of the community group Fefine Fekumi Trust said yesterday.
 
"I believe he [the new king] will follow in his father's footsteps ... and democracy will come," she said referring to mounting public pressure for democratic change in Tonga.
 
"I would like to see the royal family stay and I would like to have a democracy too."
 
Most mourners were dressed in black and wore the traditional taovala (woven garment) tied over their skirts and trousers.
 
A group of about 50 mourners sat under a white tarpaulin and sang hymns throughout the morning.
 
Labour Party Pacific Island president Hola Taua said many people regarded the late king as a hero.
 
"We so respected our king. So many people said bad things about him, but we adored him."
 
She said most Tongan people wanted democratic change. "The new king will help that process. People want to keep the royal family, but want to be able to vote."
 
The new leader of the Kingitanga, King Tuheitia, arrived at 1pm with his wife and a group of about 50 supporters. They paid their respects and sang a karakia (prayer).
 
Prime Minister Helen Clark also paid her respects, as did National MP Georgina Te Heuheu and Green MP Keith Locke.
 
Tonga's new monarch, King Siaosi Tupou V, succeeds his father.



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Rampant republicanism (and racism) in HM Realm of New Zealand!

 

 

Michael Laws
Michael Laws
 
Laws stands by criticism of King Tupou
 
1.00pm Friday September 15, 2006
 
Wanganui mayor Michael Laws has dismissed criticism of his refusal to honour the Tongan King Tupou IV, who died in Auckland on Sunday.
 
Mr Laws said it was time for people to look at the facts of a country governed by an aristocratic elite who lived in a stunning luxury while their people lived in poverty.
 
Earlier this week Mr Laws, a former MP, called King Tupou a "brown slug" on his Radio Live show and said he would not be lowering the New Zealand flag in Wanganui to honour him.
 
The Wanganui Chronicle newspaper has reported that Tongans from as far away as the United States have called for a boycott of New Zealand goods following Mr Laws' comments .
 
But Mr Laws today said Tonga, where a privileged few own all the land, controlled all the commerce and ran the government with little or no democratic input, was different to other South Pacific nations.
 
"In my view, you don't honour a leader who maintained and even strengthened such inequity."
 
Mr Laws said that he had "a benign, tourist brochure view" of the country until he went there at the start of last year.
 
"I was stunned at both the poverty and the corruption. It is not Fiji or Samoa - its institutions are medieval by comparison."
 
Mr Laws said that a US State Department survey of Tonga, published this year, itemised "systemic human rights abuses including appalling and institutionalised royal privilege and gross sexual discrimination".
 
"The facts about Tonga are self-evident. They don't lie. As mayor, I cannot be a party to honouring those concepts and practices which are anathema to the New Zealand way of life."
 
He added that he had received many phone calls and emails in support of his stance.
 
However, Oliveti Niupalavu, of San Francisco, told the Wanganui Chronicle she wanted Tongans to boycott New Zealand goods for a day - including Tongan rugby players who play for New Zealand teams.
 
Ms Niupalavu said the large Californian Tongan community was horrified to hear their late king called a slug.
 
She said she respected everyone's right to free speech but thought Mr Laws crossed the line when he used the term "brown slug" with its racial overtones.
 
"I think all Tongans should take a day to boycott Kiwi goods to show how serious we are."
 

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I'm not Tongan, and I'd join the boycott if I thought it would 'hit the target'.

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Tongan men preparing the royal tomb on Saturday. Picture / Reuters
Tongan men preparing the royal tomb on Saturday. Picture / Reuters
 
King's funeral brings capital to halt
 
UPDATED 2.50pm Tuesday September 19, 2006
By Angela Gregory
 
NUKU'ALOFA - The body of the late king of Tonga has been laid to rest in the capital Nuku'alofa.
 
The casket was lowered into a grave at 2.40pm (1.40pm NZ Time) and covered in fine mats before Tonga's royal undertakers - nima tapu - began to fill the grave with sand carried in woven baskets.
 
The Pacific nation is farewelling its beloved King Taufa'ahau Tupou IV in an elaborate state funeral that mixed tribal traditions with Christian prayers, royal pomp with village-style feasts.
 
Led by his son and successor, King Siaosi Tupou V, dignitaries from 30 nations lay wreaths and joined an estimated 10,000 people in a Wesleyan Christian funeral service at the Tongan Royal Tombs, Mala'e Kula.
 
Tupou IV died at age 88 in Auckland on Sept. 11.
 
The body of the late king of Tonga was carried through the streets of the capital Nuku'alofa by hundreds of pallbearers to his burial place.
 
At midday local time (11am NZ Time), the casket carrying the body of the 88-year-old, king, who ruled the country for nearly half a century, was carried from the royal palace.
 
It was placed carefully on a catafalque, a decorated platform to carry the casket to the tomb at the mala'e kula burial grounds.
 
Ten minutes later, the sound of a 21 gun salute fired into the harbour echoed around the capital.
 
Hundreds of Tongans gathered on the corner of each block as the catafalque was borne through the streets by 150 men at a time.
 
One thousand men took turns to support each side of the platform, which carried the heavy mahogany and lead-lined casket as well as senior undertakers.
 
The pallbearers were either former students of Tupou College or men from villages throughout the main island of Tongatapu.
 
Dignitaries have gathered from around the Pacific as well as from France, Greece, Sweden, and Switzerland.
 
New Zealand is represented by Prime Minister Helen Clark, and Australia by Governor-General Michael Jeffery.
 
The 120-strong New Zealand delegation also includes members of the local Tongan community, Maori representatives and Pacific Island leaders.
 
Little known details of monarch's life
 
You often learn something you didn't know about a person after they die and King Taufa'ahau Tupou IV is no exception.
 
Attached to the official schedule of today's funeral proceedings an official biography covers his better known achievements like his "towering legacy" in public education but includes a few details that would not be so well known outside Tonga.
 
For instance when the Tongan Government did not have enough money to start the country's first high school, the King thought laterally and acquired a movie projector.
 
He staged film screenings around the country for a small entrance fee and raised enough money to set up what is now Tonga High School.
 
It might also have come as some surprise to learn that in the King's personal life he did not "indulge his children" and some close to His Majesty described him as "frugal and thrifty and not interested in luxury".
 
The biography said his "myriad intellectual interests" included subjects like the military and shipping, and his love of reading had extended in later years to Chinese civilisation as well as practical topics like pig and poultry farming.
 
It reminds us how King Tupou IV had been described as a "renaissance man" by Time magazine.
 
The King is credited as an amateur archaeologist for unlocking secrets of Tongan archaeology by solving the mystery of the ancient Ha'amonga-'a-Maui trilithon, the great stone archway on the eastern corner of Tongatapu.
 
Some had suggested it was an entry to a royal compound but the King conducted his own scientific investigations, with the assistance of surveyors, to discover a previously unknown v-shaped notch on the upper side of the lintel.
 
"His Majesty found that the notch indicated on the horizon the rising point of the sun on the longest and shortest day of the year. This enabled the ancient Tongans to predict the seasons accurately and as a consequence they knew which part of the sky to look for the constellations at different times of the year."
 
He reformed the Tongan alphabet and was an expert in the use of the abacus.
 
King Tupou IV had embraced a special interest in mathematics, becoming a member of the International Mathematics Association, and also became a music composer and arranger.
 
The biography said his talents as a guitarist found new public acclaim when he was a featured instrumentalist on the compact disc, Millennium 2000, which remained popular to this day.
 
He was in his youth a gymnast, keen sportsman and at age 14 set a pole vault record that stood for many years.
 
When age slowed him down King Tupou IV, who had long battled weight problems associated with a "naturally large physique", had exercised by regularly climbing and descending the palace stairs or walking in the grounds of the palace residence.
 



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King Tupou IV died after a long illness. Picture / Dean Purcell
King Tupou IV died after a long illness. Picture / Dean Purcell
 
Ritual and tradition surround burial of Tongan King
 
Tuesday September 19, 2006
By Angela Gregory
 
NUKU'ALOFA - In a meticulously planned ceremony based on ancient rituals and traditions Tonga will today lay to rest King Taufa'ahau Tupou IV, who ruled the country for nearly half a century.
 
Months of careful planning have gone into the funeral of the 88-year-old, who died in Auckland 10 days ago.
 
Around midday local time (11am NZ time) the body of the King will be taken from the royal palace at Nuku'alofa to be placed on the catafalque, a decorated platform that will carry the casket, and on to the royal tombs.
 
The catafalque will be borne by hundreds of pallbearers, either former students of Tupou College or men from villages throughout the main island of Tongatapu, in the journey of about 500m.
 
One thousand men are available to take turns to support each side of the platform, which carries not only the heavy mahogany and lead-lined casket but also two senior undertakers to the tomb at the mala'e kula burial grounds.
 
It is understood the casket alone weighs close to a staggering 800kg, and the floor of the royal palace had to be strengthened to take its weight.
 
Dignitaries are attending from all over the Pacific and countries further afield, such as France, Greece, Sweden, and Switzerland.
 
New Zealand is represented by Prime Minister Helen Clark, and Australia by Governor-General Michael Jeffery.
 
The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester from Britain will also be present.
 
More than a hundred foreign media representatives have flown in over the past week to cover the funeral.
 
A large bronze statue of the King sits upon a large plinth to mark his tomb.
 
It shows the monarch in military uniform, his trousers tucked into his long boots, and holding a cap under his right arm.
 
Barrel-chested, he proudly stands at the end of a row of statues of previous monarchs, with his head slightly turned to look north.
 
Albert Vaea, master of the royal household, said yesterday that the final touches were being made to the tomb.
 
Early in the morning Tongan teenage boys sang hymns as they strolled around the perimeter of the mala'e kula picking up rubbish. Around the palace, small groups of people stayed up all last night to keep small fires of coconut fibre burning so there would be light for the King - a tradition known as the takipo.
 
But the strain of the huge preparations were beginning to show.
 
A noble's wife, Robyn Kaho, said the palace workers were stressed and tired.
 
"There were a few short fuses last night."
 
Undertaking a sacred duty
 
Tonga's royal undertakers were traditionally strangled after finishing their duties and entombed with their kings so they could accompany them to the pulotu (underworld).
 
"It was a privilege to pass away with the king," said Albert Vaea, master of the royal household.
 
That practice was replaced by the chopping off of their fingers which continued up to about 300 years ago.
 
After the latest funeral, the mala'e kula remains sacred.
 
The undertakers were under tapu for a month which meant they had to avoid public contact and had the same high status as the new King Siaosi Tupou V.
 
Mr Vaea said they might not be able to fully resume normal life for up to a year.
 

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Jovan,
Thank you for sharing this.  I am pleased that the King was laid to rest in fine Ceremony, and that the Governor-General of Australia came to show his respects.

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While looking for other things, I came across this letter about the passing and ascension of the King of Tonga:

http://www.house.gov/list/press/as00_faleomavaega/tupou4condolence.html

WASHINGTON, D.C.—FALEOMAVAEGA EXPRESSES CONDOLENCES TO KING TAUFA’AHAU’S PASSING AWAY, AND OFFERS WELL WISHES TO NEW KING OF TONGA
 

Congressman Faleomavaega Eni today expressed his deepest condolences on the passing away of His Majesty King Taufa’ahau Tupou IV of Tonga, and at the same time offered his well wishes to the newly sworn king, His Royal Highness Prince George Tupou, for assuming his rightful heir and place as King George Tupou V, after his father.

In a letter to King George Tupou V, Faleomavaega said:

“It is with deep regret and great sorrow that I write to express my sincere condolences in the darkest of times now faced by the people and the Kingdom of Tonga in the sorrowful passing away of His Majesty King Taufa’ahau Tupuou IV.  His Majesty King Taufa’ahau Tupou IV was such a dynamic monarch and political leader not only in Tonga but the Pacific during his reign, and his absence can only be filled with the benevolence of God in time.”

“May I also express my congratulations and well wishes to Your Majesty in taking the oath as the new Sovereign and assuming your rightful place as His Majesty King George Tupou V,” the Congressman continued.

“I was informed by the Minister for Foreign Affairs of Tonga, the Hon. Tu’a Taumoepeau Tupou, of the taking of the oath by His Royal Highness Prince George Tupou yesterday, and may his majesty’s assumption of the throne enlightens the pain faced by the government and people of Tonga in this altogether sad time,” Faleomavaega said in a separate statement.

“His late Majesty King Taufa’ahau Tupou IV forged the foundation of modern politics in Tonga while at the same time retained the essence of traditional monarchy on his people he so dearly loved, and his wisdom and passion for what he believed in made him well respected throughout the Pacific region,” Faleomavaega wrote the new monarch.

“He was a devout Christian, a highly religious and firm believer in God. He envisioned the essence of spiritual and mental knowledge and intelligence at an early age, and he became an educator, a talented musician, a great athlete, and a very humble and traditional monarch who was highly proud of being Tongan and Polynesian.  All of these elements he valued so highly that he emphasized and passed them on to his people.  Many Tongans throughout the region and around the world can be distinctly recognized through these values,” the Congressman continued.
 
“On a personal note, King Taufa’ahau Tupou IV had always been one of my mentors, and I have always considered him as one of the fathers of the Tonga-Samoa-Pacific family.  His  intellectual versatility was one of his main characteristics I will always treasure, and in the often-times I was blessed to share and fortunate enough to have spent with him, he made me see new dimensions in leadership, politics and personal values I never would have had if it had not been for his wisdom.  After all, how can one forget someone who gave him his first lessons in playing the balalaika?” Faleomavaega reiterated.

“I was very fortunate to have had the father-son relationship with His late Majesty, and he gave me my first lessons in playing the traditional Russian musical instrument – balalaika – of which he was a master.  He also made me aware of the concept of political navigation for the Pacific islands,” Faleomavaega recalled.

“In his soft yet deep voice, he often said to me:  ‘Eni, think of it as steering a ship through sometimes treacherous waters.  Uncharted changes will always be ahead, and you must always take note that your ship will not be broadsided.  Our ancestors looked and trusted the stars for navigation, I say you look and place your trust in God, and your journey will always be blessed,’” the Congressman said in a press statement with emotions.

“I always look forward to seeing King Taufa’ahau Tupou IV every chance I get, and I had hopes of meeting him again to re-establish our communications and friendship among other matters – but now this most mournful moment has befallen, and I am without words to express my deep sense of sorrow to Your Majesty the King, and the family.  I pray that God will grant comfort to you, Her Majesty Queen Halaevalu Mata’aho, and to all the good people of Tonga.  Please be assured of my continued respect and esteem,” Faleomavaega concluded.

The Congressman, who also can communicate in Tongan, opened his condolence letter to King George Tupou V in Tongan by saying: “Koe fakatapu e kuo aofaki he 'Otu Tonga tuku mu'a keu lave atu ai moau mei he funga maka ko Amerika Samoa.”  (I am sure that the cultural and traditional waves of salutations have now blanketed the shores of the islands of Tonga.  With humility, I ask to be included from Amerika Samoa).  “Tau maia na'e malava he'e tu'unga fakasiokalafi 'oe mamani kae a'u tonu atu e popoaki fiekaungamamahini.”  (I can only wish that the geography of the world would have it so the roads were connected and I can deliver my condolences in person).  “Teu tangi ki he ngalu'ea 'o Tutuila mo Manu'a ke fakaa'u atu 'eku 'ofa lahi moe fiekaunga mamahi moe 'Afiona he po'uli lolo kuo toka ho'o 'Otu Motu Anga'ofa.”  (But I have called on the tradewinds of Tutuila and Manu'a to deliver my kindest regards and willingness of heart, to share your burden during this pitch-dark period that is overwhelming Your Majesty, Your House and the Friendly Islands of Tonga).




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