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Wessexman

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Reply with quote  #76 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidV
I admit it has been an expression of my exasperation. I just don't like too much nitpicking even when opinions are accepted as legitimate.


Peter made a counter argument and claimed your argument was not true, but his point was fallacious. Yes, certainly, there is no need to critique all opinions, but I don't see why one cannot assess them at all. It doesn't seem like nitpicking to me. It seems like actually taking them serious and trying to determine whether they are true or not. Indeed, the accusation of nitpicking seems inconsistent, seeing as Peter's comment itself would then have to be nitpicking too.

The simple fact is that the idea that monarch's tend to be more balanced - which is the most obvious way of reading your point - is not untrue because some monarch's have been.
kataak

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Reply with quote  #77 
Bizarre and funny news from Poland: On this Sunday there are local elections (voivodships assembles, presidents of the cities, city council member etc. are elected) in Poland and what can be interesting for you is the monarchist committee in one of the voivodships (Dolnoślskie) called KWW Monarchiści (Electoral Committee of Voters "Monarchists" and they candidate for city council membership in Wrocław. Also in the same city there are candidates for various offices from that disgusting Janusz Korwin-Mikke party which are somehow connected with Organizacja Monarchistów Polskich (OMP, http://www.legitymizm.org). As you can see Wrocław is some kind of monarchist stronghold ([biggrin]), although I wonder if that first committee will get more than 100 votes.
AugieDoggie

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Reply with quote  #78 
Nice to see a Polish monarchist here, even if you don't post very often. [smile]

To be honest, though, I thought it would be more likely that Polish cities that used to be a part of Austria-Hungary (Kraków, Nowy Sącz, Przemyśl, etc.) would be more monarchist in sympathy. Indeed, Wrocław is a Silesian city, and before 1945 was largely German in population.

Then again, in these times, you never can be too sure of what will happen. [wink]
kataak

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Reply with quote  #79 
Actually Poland is probably the least monarchy-friendly country in Europe so monarchy simply have no support. In former Austria-Hungary there is some sentiment for A-H but not connected with monarchism. Only some individuals are monarchists, sadly most often they are con-liberal. 
AugieDoggie

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Reply with quote  #80 
Well, that's a downer. [frown]

How do Poles feel about the old Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth? After all, the current republic, like the old Commonwealth, is called a Rzeczpospolita.
kataak

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Reply with quote  #81 
I don't want to spam so I will answer you in that topic:
https://royalcello.websitetoolbox.com/post/monarchy-in-poland-2174988
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #82 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egyptian_parliamentary_election,_2015
http://www.dailynewsegypt.com/2014/11/15/mubarak-era-politicians-run-parliamentary-elections/

Whatever electoral system Egypt has chosen, notwithstanding that it needs a representative and effective parliament, it might be reasonable to ask whose interests does it serve when you have a confusing array of political parties and a confusing array of alliances.

I guess now, Egypt has become a bit like Turkey. In this case, both the secular Left and religious conservatives, not to mention the liberals, have simply returned to their customary Sadat and Mubarak era roles, except with more freedom to operate and compete. They play the game by the rules of the military and that's that, so no more than "loyal opposition". And you might say that at least leftists and liberals in Egypt (unlike their Western counterparts!) are not idiots when it comes to radical Islam, while both Sufis and Salafists benefit from the crushing of the Muslim Brotherhood.

But this shows you how challenging it is for Egyptian civil society to rebuild a pluralist political culture which had been destroyed when King Farouk was overthrown in 1952. And without the monarchy, civil society in Egypt will lack the anchor and arbitrator it badly needs.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #83 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sri_Lankan_presidential_election,_2015

The decade-long regime of Mahinda Rajapaksa, which did the right thing and crushed the brutal terrorists of LTTE, has been defeated at the polls by his former health minister Maithripala Sirisena, who is endorsed by a big tent of opposition parties including the conservative UNP, the Buddhist nationalist JHU, Sarath Fonseka's DP, some leftist groups, and Tamil and Muslim parties.

In my view this is the best result to further peace, progress and reconciliation in the country. Like his defeated rival, Sirisena is a devout Buddhist which is very admirable, but he is also seeking reforms like a return to straight out parliamentarism. Sri Lanka also needs further decentralisation to placate Tamil aspirations.
Queenslander

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Reply with quote  #84 
A good result as the previous occupant of Prime Minister was veering too close to the dictatorial for my liking, this ensures the process of parliament functions somewhat in that tawdry replacement for the old Ceylon.
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KYMonarchist

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Reply with quote  #85 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Queenslander
A good result as the previous occupant of Prime Minister was veering too close to the dictatorial for my liking, this ensures the process of parliament functions somewhat in that tawdry replacement for the old Ceylon.


Rajapaksa was President, not PM. And this was seriously unexpected, I'd thought for sure there'd have to be an Orange Revolution-type event to get Rajapaksa to leave office!
Queenslander

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Reply with quote  #86 
I stand corrected. Yes I thought we would have to shoe-horn or shoot him out of office myself.
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DavidV

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Reply with quote  #87 
I applaud Rajapakasa's pursuance of the Civil War to the end by defeating the LTTE. But he has alienated too many with his increasingly authoritarian drift, alleged nepotism, and questions over national reconciliation.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #88 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_parliamentary_election,_2015

The first of the major elections held recently, in Poland, was impacted both by the migration crisis and the Ukraine crisis with a shift to the hard-Right parties Law and Justice and Kukiz '15 which includes far-right members. Most magnificent of all, Poland elected a Parliament without any left-wing or ex-Communist MPs, making this the most right-wing Parliament in Europe.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Croatian_parliamentary_election,_2015

In Croatia, it was a dead heat in which regional and ethnic minority parties are the spoiler between right-of-centre and left-of-centre coalitions.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myanmar_general_election,_2015

The Burmese election in 2015 was the first since 1990 to reflect the will of the people and should give Burma its first legitimate government since 1962.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turkish_general_election,_November_2015

Erdogan's AKP won a majority, while the radical Right MHP and the radical Left HDP lost ground.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argentine_general_election,_2015

This election has been important not only for Argentina, but in Latin America and beyond. Argentina has elected a seemingly sensible right-of-centre President in Mauricio Macri, the first time it has made a seemingly reasonable choice in decades.

Macri is expected to steer Argentina back towards a pro-Western orientation and is likely to be more less confrontational on the Falklands. His main priority is to address Argentina's underlying social and economic problems.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #89 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venezuelan_parliamentary_election,_2015

Voters in Venezuela have rebuked the 3Cs - Chavez, Castro and Corbyn - by voting for the opposition with a two-thirds majority in the legislature. They will now have the task of deposing the unpopular President Nicolas Maduro. An era of the "Pink Tide" in Latin America is coming to an end.
Queenslander

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Reply with quote  #90 
Nice to see the tide going out there, perhaps something odd will appear in the shops around the nation soon - food and with a choice of quantity and type to buy.
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