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DavidV

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https://au.news.yahoo.com/world/a/31775796/brazils-surfer-prince-urges-return-to-monarchy/

Brazil has been in the news lately. A mass movement against Dilma Rousseff, and widespread public disgust with corrupt and inept government, itself hardly unique to Brazil in the Latin American context. But where Brazil is unique, of course, is that it once had a monarchy of its own (only Mexico and Haiti shared this distinction in the post-colonial Western Hemisphere) and a certain degree of popular sentiment in favour of it.

No, it won't solve all of Brazil's myriad of problems, but the presidential system has been shown in Latin America to be completely bonkers.
Domhangairt

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Reply with quote  #2 
Dom Pedro II was very popular with peasants and natives. He and his daughter shunned slavery , and ironically this was their downfall. Devout Catholics, they believed  slavery to e an affront to God. In the process they made serious enemies among the land-owning class who relied on cheap labour to keep their vast estates viable and profitable. 

The land-owning class conspired with the military to depose Dom Pedro, but by this time, he had lost interest himself in the Brazilian monarchy after loosing both his sons. His Orleanist son-in-law was unpopular, though both families are ultimately male-line branches of the same European royal house, the House of Capet founded by Hughues Capet, Count of Paris in the late tenth century. Brazil was a great power under the benevolent Braganza monarchy, it can be again. The politicians are shockers, most of them. 
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #3 
More mainstream media coverage of monarchism in Brazil:
http://www.wsj.com/articles/new-plan-to-fix-brazils-royal-mess-restore-the-monarchy-1466187675
Domhangairt

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Reply with quote  #4 
Brazil needs fundamental political and constitutional reform. The monarchy on it's own won't solve all the problems. But a non-partisan constitutional monarch with limited, but important constitutional powers will be a far better head of state than Brazil's parade of corrupt party political presidents. 

DavidV

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https://globalvoices.org/2016/06/17/as-president-faces-impeachment-brazils-royal-family-wants-to-play-game-of-thrones-for-real/

It's an interesting strategy in Brazil that the Imperial Family have more or less attached themselves to a popular protest movement. The idea of royalty dabbling directly in politics might not sit well with everyone, but it may show that they above all else identify with the aspirations of those who would and should be their subjects.

Brazil is experiencing a ferment that is similar to what is taking place elsewhere in Latin America which in fact transcends political and ideological distinctions. It is a demand by the aspirational classes for better governance, for a transparency, honesty and due process. These are things that are alien to so much of Latin America, save for Uruguay and Chile today. There are other countries making significant strides in these areas. You can see that changes of government in Guatemala and Argentina, and protests in Venezuela and Brazil, reflect these demands.

Domhangairt

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Reply with quote  #6 
I prefer Dom Joao. He is modern, relaxed, and much more in touch with ordinary Brazilians. Dom Bertrand is so out of touch with ordinary people , he could never be a national leader. I don't know enough about Dom Rafael, I must listen to his video. Dom Joao should be Emperor if constitutional monarchy restored. He is very close to ordinary people. Brazilian monarchy could never be formal like the British monarchy. Just won't go down with such a vibrant people. 
AugieDoggie

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Reply with quote  #7 
Are you talking about the rival Petrópolis line to the Brazilian throne? The two living Dom Joãos in that line aren't especially close to the succession; the head of that line is Dom Pedro Carlos, and even if he were more successful than Doms Luís and Bertrand, there are rumors that he is a republican.

The article's condescending tone is irritating (notice how they put almost anything referring to the monarchy in quotes), but I'm excited that the restoration of the monarchy is becoming a real issue again! Frankly, I think Brazilians should be lucky that Dom Bertrand and Dom Luís actually care about their country.
Peter

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Reply with quote  #8 

In the happy event of a renewed Brazilian monarchy, anyone at all could become Emperor by election with perfect legitimacy. Obviously it would though be desirable to preserve a connection with the past by choosing someone from the Orléans e Bragança line. As there are in fact two lines in competition with each other, both able to propound reasonable arguments for their claim, one might as well pick on the basis of immediate suitability for the role rather than dynastic seniority, and not worry about which line you draw from. The argument is that Dom João Henrique is the best candidate on that basis. I’m not saying I agree, I’m just saying that that is why his name comes up despite his being junior in the formal succession, as you say.

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