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VasilyBloksin17

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Reply with quote  #76 
>I lost interest in MM with his ill informed rantings about Emperor Haile Selassie and his sympathy for the illegitimate usurpation of the Ethiopian throne by Vittorio Emanuelle III at the behest of the fascists.

Again, he's doing white interests first and foremost. He even defended Belgians killing Blacks, the bastard.
Windemere

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Reply with quote  #77 
Thanks for the previous interesting and informative posts regarding the current trials and tribulations of the Trump administration.

I'd like to make some comments about David's observation in post # 33 about the Irish regarding themselves as a "sinned-against" people. Since time immemorial, that seems to have been a salient characteristic of the Irish national identity. Lady Jane Wilde wrote over a hundred years ago " ....The history of Ireland repeats itself from age to age with such a mournful rhythm....Each generation goes through the same phases - resistance, defeat, despair. The new generation follows with hopes as brilliant and resolves as bold, again to try, again to fail. And so the sad trilogy is acted from age to age, while the nation can only helplessly mourn, as victim after victim falls dead in the dust of the arena...... "(Notes on Men, Women, and Books, 1891).  While other nations celebrate their victories and triumphs, the Irish seem to memorialize their failures, defeats, and lost glories. The heroes of other nations are their successful military and political leaders, while Ireland's heroes are usually martyrs. The more gloomy their history, the more the Irish seem to esteem it.

The only other nation that I can think of that seems to dwell so consistently upon it's tragic past is Serbia. The Serbians, too, seem to  take solace in remembering their nation's tragedies and defeats. The last king of the medieval Serbian kingdom, Stefan Uros V, was young, inexperienced, and ineffectual. He died rather early in life, childless, and he presided over a kingdom that was  beginning to fall apart. Yet the Serbian church canonized him, and reveres him to this day.  While other nations remember their victories, Serbia's defining national event seems to have been their defeat in 1389 at Kosovo Field (the Field of Blackbirds). (Actually, the battle itself was inconclusive, but it foreshadowed the collapse of the medieval Serbian kingdom). Knez (Grand Prince) Lazar and his army chose a heavenly, rather than earthly, kingdom, and Serbia soon fell under a Turkish domination that lasted for about five centuries. Like Ireland, Serbian culture appears to take a sad dignity in recalling their nation's  doleful past history.

Even their native musical instruments seem to reflect this mournful view of their history. The Irish harp and the Serbian gusla (banjo), both stringed instruments, emit rather plaintive, melancholy musical sounds. Irish ballads and Serbian poems commemorate their countries' glum histories.

In both nations, it was their Church and clergy who maintained the nations' sense of national identity through centuries of foreign domination. It was the clergy of the Irish Catholic Church, and the Serbian Orthodox Church, that perpetuated a sense of nationhood during this time. Both the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches tended to advocate patience and forbearance in the face of adversity.  Both these churches seem to thrive under adversity. Where other lands' churches took an active role in politics, the Irish Church usually advocated resignation to, and acceptance of, earthly suffering, and this seems to have become ingrained in the Irish persona. I wonder if today, the clergy might secretly hold some nostalgia for the past, when they were the custodians of their peoples'  culture and aspirations, rather than the modern political administrations that are now the focus of popular leadership and direction.



__________________
Dis Aliter Visum "Beware of martyrs and those who would die for their beliefs; for they frequently make many others die with them, often before them, sometimes instead of them."
Peter

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Reply with quote  #78 
Actually, all medieval Serbian kings were canonised, with the sole exception of Stephen Uroš V's father Stephen Uroš IV. Who ironically was the most powerful and successful of them all, which might be seen as fitting your theme of the celebration of defeat. In fact, though, it was because he was a parricide, and even the Serbian Orthodox Church could not quite bring itself to bestow a heavenly crown on him to go with the earthly crown he had worn with such accomplishment. Also, the medieval Serbian kingdom had collapsed following the Battle of Maritsa in 1371 and Stephen Uroš V's heirless death in the same year. The various lords ruling over various parts of it came together at Kosovo, but the kingdom was already history by then. As for the Irish, their memory for a grudge is rivalled only by that of the Scots. Which is the less romantic side of this cult of sorrow.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #79 
My whole beef is how pernicious the "sinned against" victim mentality has been since it seems to have influenced much of modern identity politics and victim culture. Indeed, the Irish have made a habit of identifying with other "oppressed people". The problem, as I said, is that there's a nauseating sanctimony there and in a different way in Scandinavian countries like Sweden, where they think that they're goody two shoes countries who nobody hates, blah blah blah. The point is that the unhinged rants of Nadia Chan should be a wake-up call to them, that they're not going to be spared by the race-baiters and Islamists.

All that can be said about Serbia may be true, though the successful Serbian rebellion ushered in a new monarchy which is different. One thing I can say is that some Serbs do have a habit of using a certain victim mentality described above to excuse some of the things that happened during the Balkan Wars of the 90s.

Meanwhile, don't tell me the Left aren't fond of violence:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4874194/Corbyn-s-deputy-John-McDonnell-wants-violent-uprising.html
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #80 
Not the first time Antifa have disrespected memorials to victims of Communism either:
https://www.campusreform.org/?ID=9794
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #81 
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Janet Albrechtsen
The phrase “First World problem” started as a funny meme, became a common hashtag on social media and soon enough entered dictionaries. Surveys about First World problems find that slow internet speed tops the list, along with not finding your favourite food on your local supermarket shelf. We tell this lame joke at the expense of our own wealth, except that our good fortune has also created another set of First World problems. And they are deadly serious.
 
Some are literally deadly. Last weekend, Seth Berkley, the chief executive of Gavi, an alliance between the World Health Organisation and drug makers to distribute vaccines to poor countries, said he was increasingly worried by the outbreak of preventable diseases in the developed world.
 
Berkley pointed to the rich phenomenon of “Whole Foods mums” who feed their children organic produce and question whether vaccines are needed any more.
 
Here is a First World problem writ large: a lucky generation that has never known the misery, maiming and death caused by diseases that are now preventable thanks to modern-day vaccines. We haven’t seen young limbs mangled, children unable to breathe, drowning in their own secretions, when polio hit a peak of 39.1 per 100,000 people in 1938, with further outbreaks in 1956 and 1961. Today, polio is a thing of the past because a vaccine introduced in 1966 protects us from this killer disease.
 
We don’t see young children racked with spasms and cramp from tetanus, or suffocating from whooping cough. It’s likely we don’t know that 4075 people died from diphtheria between 1926 and 1935 and that deaths from the deadly disease fell to zero by 1990. Or that 2808 people, mainly small children, died from whooping cough between 1926 and 1935, with only a tiny fraction of deaths after 1986.
 
In Australia today, the more affluent the postcode, the more potent the complacency. The latest figures released in June show that in central Sydney, just 70.5 per cent of five-year-olds are fully vaccinated (worse than Byron Bay), compared with 99.5 per cent in Woonona, a northern suburb of Wollongong. My own suburb has an immunisation rate of 84.2 per cent, well below the 95 per cent cover that provides what doctors call herd immunity. South Australia has immunisation coverage at 93.4 per cent, exceeding the national average, yet in Adelaide just 91.9 per cent of five-year-olds are fully immunised. Perth has an immunisation rate of 90 per cent, compared with 99.2 per cent in Broome. Across the rich developed word, the “Whole Foods mum” phenomenon is putting lives at risk, while countries such as Zambia and Vietnam report higher rates of immunisation against measles, mumps and rubella than Britain.
 
Trying to confront this rich curse of complacency, the Turnbull government last week beefed up the “no jab, no pay” laws. Parents on Family Tax Benefit A will have their fortnightly payments reduced by $28 if their children are not immunised.
 
It’s hoped that the more immediate cut to benefits, instead of previous cuts to end-of-year supplements, will inspire more parents to fully immunise their children sooner rather than later.
 
When former prime minister Tony Abbott first introduced the “no jab, no pay” policy a few years ago, ABC’s AM radio program ran an interview with academic Raina MacIntyre, who criticised the move to dock welfare payments to parents: “They work, they pay taxes. They have an entitlement to those benefits.” Succumbing to this First World problem, the head of the school of public health and community medicine at the University of NSW inadvertently pointed to another one too.
 
Too many of us are members of the entitlement generation because we have never experienced the horror of a depression or even a recession. After 26 straight years without a recession, economic vanity has reached the point where every move to cut benefits — even when parents don’t vaccinate their kids — is met with howls of outrage. It’s afflicted our political leaders, too. Instead of serious attempts to reform structural entitlement spending baked into the budget, the Turnbull government chose the easy path of a bank levy to plug the fiscal hole. Will it take real hardship, a recession perhaps, for common sense to trump this complacency?
 
We are a lucky generation indeed, one that has no experience of communism or socialism either. Casting aside the Cold War as old history, many in the rich First World continue their love affair with socialism, even as food shortages in socialist Venezuela kill people daily. Inflation there is set to reach 720 per cent and supermarket shelves are emptying. When you can find food, a basket of basics costs four times the monthly minimum wage, according to the Venezuela-based Centre for Social Analysis and Documentation. It might be fun for the Greens and Labor leader Bill Shorten to flirt with socialism, promising to spend more of other people’s money and to tax the rich more. Until we end up living the consequences of that conceit too.
 
Other First World problems are equally perilous. We are the generation that has no experience of living without basic freedoms. So we take them for granted and regularly curb them without understanding that we are chipping away at the core liberal project. The “cultural McCarthyism” that John Howard warned about in 1994 has taken hold. Freedom of speech is routinely curtailed in the name of not hurting someone’s feelings. Universities are cottonwool campuses that offer safe ­spaces and trigger warnings rather than robust intellectual learning.
 
Students regularly resort to violence to silence people with different views. If liberalism is the measuring stick, this is not ­progress.
 
We are the generation that assumed we would be better parents than our own, by helicoptering over our children. Lawnmower parents try to clear the way for their kids, then Hoover up after them when things go wrong. The generation that will follow us is at risk of losing resilience to deal with the vicissitudes of life, suggesting we are not half as clever as we think we are.
 
We are the generation that also lost sight of the real meaning of equality. The civil rights movement was premised on equal political and legal rights regardless of race, creed, gender and sexuality. In the 21st century identity politics has become the ultimate First World indulgence, weaponising difference with scant regard for the consequences of dividing people into noisy identity-based tribes demanding different treatment.
 
Our smugness has extended to assuming we can live in the luxury of green fashion without paying the price. That folly has been exposed by skyrocketing electricity bills that hurt the poor the most, frequent blackouts, an unstable energy grid, local investors choosing to do business in countries with cheaper energy and foreigners sucking up taxpayer-funded subsidies in our rent-seeking renewables industry. A decade ago we didn’t need to ask our governments to keep the lights on. Now we do. More fool us.
 
There is a common denominator here. We tend to assume the story of humanity is one of constant progress. But we should remember that after the Roman Empire collapsed, western Europe returned to the Dark Ages for 1000 years until the Renaissance. First World arrogance has led to the most diabolic First World problem of all: a deluded belief that we are immune from going backwards.
 
Wessexman

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Reply with quote  #82 
It is amazing that these people are ignorant even of the history of their own movements. The girl is waving an anarcho-communist flag, mocking a monument to the victims of Marxist-Leninists. She seems to not realise Marxist-Leninists didn't much like anarcho-communists, and were often happy enough to kill and persecute them. 
Peter

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Reply with quote  #83 
The final paragraph of the article David posted above spoiled an otherwise cogent and interesting piece. Firstly, the Dark Ages are so known because they are dark to us, in the sense that we know little about what took place, not because they were so primitive and barbaric. They may not have seemed dark at all to those living through them. Secondly, they didn't last anything like a thousand years. Thirdly, while I certainly wouldn't like to have lived in the Middle Ages and am very glad for the Renaissance and all the progress that flowed from it, those Middle Ages were still an era of high culture that has left us many glorious monuments, not least the great cathedrals.

Still, it was nice to read one of these articles without it taking paragraph after paragraph to get to its real point, which was to attack marriage equality. Never even got mentioned! Though alas I couldn't agree that the civil rights movement was 'premised on equal rights ... regardless of race, creed, gender and sexuality'. The first especially, the next two somewhat, the last not at all. The gay rights movement was inspired by that for civil rights, but was a later add-on which many of those campaigning for equal rights for every other minority would have sternly opposed. And while the argument is more or less over for the first three, it very much continues for the last.
DavidV

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Reply with quote  #84 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wessexman
It is amazing that these people are ignorant even of the history of their own movements. The girl is waving an anarcho-communist flag, mocking a monument to the victims of Marxist-Leninists. She seems to not realise Marxist-Leninists didn't much like anarcho-communists, and were often happy enough to kill and persecute them. 


I know that, but to be sure the Antifa and general Radical Left coalition is a big enough tent to obscure these things to the casual viewer. Often it's Trotskyists who are at the forefront of Far Left protests, and the general impression from many on the Right is that the mainstream Left and liberal parties tolerate them, as some kind of cheerleaders for the broader Left agenda.
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